'Can you say something about your support mechanisms and funding?'
February 9, 2015 8:23 AM   Subscribe

Optimism of Intellect
Thanks to a new wave of small intellectual magazines, an infectious buzz has returned to public debate in the United States. Roman Schmidt talks to David Marcus who, as a new editor at Dissent, is well placed to provide the lowdown what's driving this genuinely critical movement.

American Writing Special - Little Voice
A conversation with David Rose, little magazine veteran and publisher of Lapham’s Quarterly - “I hear the argument, Oh, these poor little magazines with their tiny readerships, if only people appreciated them more. It’s partly true. But the bigger side of that is, well, if only you knew how to read a budget. If only you actually knew anything about publishing.” see Lingua Bancarupta. 'For New Inquiry publisher Rachel Rosenfelt, building cultural significance was easy — building a sustainable business is the hard part.'

magazines, journals, ezines, group blogs mentioned, with a few other selections:

Kursbuch // Les Temps Modernes // Lingua Franca // The Airship // The Baffler // National Affairs // n+1 // The New Inquiry // Jacobin // Full Stop // HTML Giant // The American Reader // Worn Journal // Scratch // Dissent // Hazlitt // Open Letters Monthly // Lana Turner Journal // The Brooklyn Rail // The Conversant // Jadaliyya // Matter Monthly // Dark Matter // Souciant // Social Text // qarrtsiluni // Constellations // Raritan

or you can check out the Compiled Winners of the Pushcart Prize
posted by the man of twists and turns (18 comments total) 30 users marked this as a favorite
 
Oh my, how many article from each do we need to read prior to having any business commenting on the blue?
posted by sammyo at 8:59 AM on February 9, 2015


Well it's still snowing and I really don't want to shovel any more.
posted by sammyo at 8:59 AM on February 9, 2015 [1 favorite]


Is there somewhere I can find a long list of these with little blurbs describing their missions, size, and maybe a couple of example article titles?
posted by amtho at 9:50 AM on February 9, 2015


tl;dr at the moment, but, are there any, for lack of a better word, "conservative" journals in this new trend? I ask because it would be a refreshing change vs. most of what we see coming from the mainstream US right these days.
posted by ZenMasterThis at 9:51 AM on February 9, 2015 [1 favorite]


listening to Dissent's new co-editor talk about the issues he has with obtaining funding within the increasingly privatized and non-public money funded market of small magazines makes me really sad

consider me convinced to donate

it also makes me wonder if a lot of the issues that Democracy, Now! has with release, viewership, and production values are simply related to the amazingly high cost and high bar we have now for television productions
posted by saucy_knave at 10:03 AM on February 9, 2015 [1 favorite]


~ZenMasterThis: Off the top of my head, National Affairs, The New Atlantis, and The American Conservative are each solid conservative publications that have resisted becoming Republican echo chambers, and I think deserve inclusion here.
posted by Cash4Lead at 10:08 AM on February 9, 2015 [4 favorites]


Commentary would also fall in that group, although obviously with a slant towards issues concerning Judaism
posted by leotrotsky at 10:16 AM on February 9, 2015 [2 favorites]


tl;dr at the moment, but, are there any, for lack of a better word, "conservative" journals in this new trend? I ask because it would be a refreshing change vs. most of what we see coming from the mainstream US right these days.

Although a key distinction here is, though these magazines exist, what they have clearly failed to do, namely engage in a substantive way with the average conservative voter or politician. It's what WFB* accomplished with the National Review, circumscribing the definition of acceptable 'conservatism' to exclude fringe elements like the John Birch Society, Anti-Semites, White Supremacists, Racists, etc.

The Right now could well benefit from someone actively working to legitimize an intellectually coherent and consistent philosophy of limited government. David Frum has attempted to do this to an extent with Frum Forum, but has not been particularly successful.

Otherwise you have what you currently see: the lunatics running the asylum.

*Yes, WFB is an incredibly polarizing figure, and by no means a saint, but he is a very important figure in the history of American conservative thought in the 20th century.
posted by leotrotsky at 10:24 AM on February 9, 2015 [2 favorites]


The Right now could well benefit from someone actively working to legitimize an intellectually coherent and consistent philosophy of limited government.

All the intellectually consistent conservatives are called liberals now. The true liberals were marginalized almost out of existence.
posted by Schrodinger's Gat at 11:09 AM on February 9, 2015


This is awesome, and I was just discussing The Left with a friend. She and I have a running 20-dollar bet over which will come first: the implosion of The Right or the resurgence of a new The Left.

No winners yet.
posted by eclectist at 11:24 AM on February 9, 2015


The Right now could well benefit from someone actively working to legitimize an intellectually coherent and consistent philosophy of limited government.

All the intellectually consistent conservatives are called liberals now. The true liberals were marginalized almost out of existence.


Snark away, but you've got a lot of Republican party machinery that is still successfully getting candidates elected across broad swathes of the country, and it is running on intellectual vacuum right now. That cannot sustain indefinitely. Heritage has been lobotomized and turned into a marketing arm, viciously attacking a healthcare plan that they themselves helped design. Cato has barely recovered from a Koch-led coup. One of the reasons I think Republicans are so virulently Anti-Obama (besides the obvious racism of some of their constituents) is that it's one of the few things that they can cling to that they all agree on. Once Obama leaves office, they don't even have that.

The Republican Party is without a coherent ideology, and it is completely obvious to anyone who looks. As a result, you get party leaders frequently saying stuff that's self-contradictory and nonsensical because there's no coherent or consistent principles underneath them. Witness the recent comments of Christie on vaccines as compared to his earlier position on Ebola. The Republican party literally does not know what it stands for anymore, and that's a problem for all of us in a two-party system.
posted by leotrotsky at 12:10 PM on February 9, 2015 [1 favorite]


tl;dr at the moment, but, are there any, for lack of a better word, "conservative" journals in this new trend?

let's try The American Conservative // Taki's Magazine // Chronicles // The American Spectator // City Journal // The New Criterion // The Claremont Review Of Books

The questions it seems is Can the GOP be the Party of Ideas? Not if the Left owns the culture.
posted by the man of twists and turns at 12:35 PM on February 9, 2015 [1 favorite]


Feh.

Dissent.

Hackish wingnut welfare pro-war pseudo-leftist twats.
posted by MartinWisse at 1:22 PM on February 9, 2015


And the reason why there aren't any rightwing intellectual magazines is because rightwing intellectual rigor is an oxymoron, a fraud and has been long before William F. Buckley, Jr. tried to stand on top of the world yelling stop. It's always a cover for I got mine and racism.
posted by MartinWisse at 1:24 PM on February 9, 2015



Taki's Magazine? Really? Bastion of racism and general wingnuttery? A look at their masthead: notorious transphobe Gavin McInnes, notorius asshole Jim Goad, notorious scientific racist Steve Sailer, lots of racism and transphobia. If that's what an "Intellectual" conservative magazine looks like...eek.
posted by Pseudonymous Cognomen at 1:34 PM on February 9, 2015 [1 favorite]


The Republican party literally does not know what it stands for anymore

It hasn't for a while, really? Or rather, people who call themselves "Republicans" believe in very different things. On the one hand you have socially moderate "limited government" types and "Libertarians" who are neutral on issues like abortion, or pro-choice, who are indifferent to or supportive of gay marriage, who are neutral on or in favour of cannabis legalisation, who support sensible immigration reform, and run on the traditional core GOP platform of "smaller government, lower taxes, strong military". These are the relatively sane Republicans, and the problem the Republican party has is that there aren't that as many of them as there are the socially-conservative anti-abortion homophobic xenophobes (largely represented by the South and ideologically indistinguishable in most respects from pre-1960's Southern Democrats), who have become the single largest group of elected Republicans. This is a problem, because the Republican Party needs a candidate from the first group to win a national election...but then they have to pander to the second group and end up alienating vast swathes of voters they used to be able to do without, but can't anymore (women, Hispanics, the secular and socially moderate, etc).
posted by Pseudonymous Cognomen at 1:51 PM on February 9, 2015


The short version is that the GOP has essentially turned itself into a party of and for delusional psychopaths and the cultural arms of the GOP have responded by doing everything they can to make "delusional psychopath" as large a constituency as possible.
posted by Pope Guilty at 2:06 PM on February 9, 2015 [1 favorite]


I got turned on to Jacobin Magazine via chomsky.info. Really good stuff. Lately I've been reading Utopia or Bust, an anthology of essays about left-wing thinkers published via some sort of affiliation with Jacobian, and I'm enjoying it a great deal.
posted by fivebells at 2:26 PM on February 9, 2015


« Older Lossless, lossless, lossless   |   Lebensader ✿ Newer »


This thread has been archived and is closed to new comments