33 Musicians Discuss Their Favorite Radiohead Songs
March 16, 2015 8:10 AM   Subscribe

Stereogum polled dozens of notable musicians about their favorite Radiohead songs, and this is how they responded.
posted by josher71 (62 comments total) 16 users marked this as a favorite
 
Spoiler alert: Noel Gallagher likes something.
posted by davebush at 8:15 AM on March 16, 2015 [2 favorites]


Spoiler alert: Noel Gallagher likes something.

But it's actually just one of his own songs. :(
posted by resurrexit at 8:20 AM on March 16, 2015 [5 favorites]


I'm surprised that nobody picked "Lucky".
posted by I-baLL at 8:23 AM on March 16, 2015 [5 favorites]


Unsurprisingly, national treasure J. Mascis nails it right on the head.
posted by Ufez Jones at 8:25 AM on March 16, 2015 [1 favorite]


"No Surprises" in this article? Hardly!

(seriously, this song was nobody's favorite? sheesh)
posted by the painkiller at 8:26 AM on March 16, 2015 [9 favorites]


There's just enough "There, There" there.
posted by Iridic at 8:29 AM on March 16, 2015 [3 favorites]


man, that Tycho response is the most Tycho thing I've ever heard

is he like always high or does he just get high for PR opportunities
posted by runt at 8:31 AM on March 16, 2015 [4 favorites]


BEN GIBBARD: of the works of any seminal artist we must first undertake to achieve a critical synthesis
J MASCIS: this sounds cool and is neat and I like it because it is cool and neat
posted by Rustic Etruscan at 8:33 AM on March 16, 2015 [15 favorites]


Only one vote for "Paranoid Android"? It is an obvious choice, but for good reason. (Try this sublime live version, too.)

Listening to that song with headphones on - on the train, late at night, and especially after a couple of beers - makes me feel like I am somehow separate from the rest of the world and watching it like it's a movie.
posted by AgentRocket at 8:34 AM on March 16, 2015 [3 favorites]


I wonder what that animator is doing right now?

Hey, Skrillex, if you're reading this: the mighty Magnus Carlsson is still as busy as ever. His latest series is called "Benny Brun och hans överläppsfjun" and you can watch some episodes here.

posted by soundofsuburbia at 8:41 AM on March 16, 2015 [2 favorites]


I've always found that a reliable barometer for whether we'll get along is "do you like OK Computer and earlier albums, or do you like Kid A and later albums."

I'm not surprised seeing which musicians agree with me and which ones don't!
posted by Old Man McKay at 8:44 AM on March 16, 2015


Electioneering is a really really great song.
posted by leotrotsky at 8:48 AM on March 16, 2015


Huh. I thought Codex was about suicide, not swimming.
posted by swift at 8:50 AM on March 16, 2015


They really need 1/3 of a musician more for this list to really work properly.
posted by srboisvert at 8:50 AM on March 16, 2015 [3 favorites]


Study Tip: Ctr+F: "Fake Plastic Trees," "The Bends" or "Pablo Honey" to filter for just the correct answers.
posted by byanyothername at 8:52 AM on March 16, 2015 [2 favorites]


They really need 1/3 of a musician more for this list to really work properly.

Quality zinger, sir.
posted by josher71 at 8:54 AM on March 16, 2015


I'd like to say there were no surprises in this article (Tycho as pretentious as all fuck? Who knew?), but there were. Purity Ring have damn good taste in Radiohead. And Kathleen Hanna, of all people, is one of the "I refuse to listen to anything after Kid A! I just don't get it!" crowd, which tickles my heart for some reason. Now I kind of wish there were a Julie Ruin song singling out late-period Radiohead for special castigation. She should damn well hurry up and write one.
posted by Sonny Jim at 8:57 AM on March 16, 2015 [1 favorite]


I enjoyed Ed Droste's bit about "Let Down," although I always took it to be about how life just fucking crushes you and how pointless it is to have any optimism for the future (I guess depression is under that umbrella). It's also my favorite Radiohead song.
posted by Dr-Baa at 9:01 AM on March 16, 2015 [1 favorite]


33 Musicians Discuss Their Favorite Radiohead Songs

This is the worst party I have ever been to. I need another beer.
posted by maryr at 9:03 AM on March 16, 2015 [9 favorites]


I guess I must be old now, because what? Really? There's a band called "Diarrhea Planet"?
posted by nebulawindphone at 9:10 AM on March 16, 2015 [3 favorites]


I guess I must be old now, because what? Really? There's a band called "Diarrhea Planet"?

And they are pretty good, too!
posted by josher71 at 9:19 AM on March 16, 2015 [4 favorites]


All these people are wrong. Except one guy.
posted by jeffamaphone at 9:21 AM on March 16, 2015


Huh. No "Everything in Its Right Place." Too obvious? For me, that song was the surest marker of the changeover from 1999 to 2000 (even though it didn't get released till late in the year).

I guess I must be old now, because what? Really? There's a band called "Diarrhea Planet"?

Yes. Unfortunately, if you live in Nashville it's not even a surprise that a band with that name exists.
posted by blucevalo at 9:23 AM on March 16, 2015 [3 favorites]


And, in the grand tradition of "The One I Love", none of them understands the lyrics to "All I Need". Sigh.
posted by gsh at 9:31 AM on March 16, 2015 [4 favorites]


My favorite Radiohead song is both sides of Neu! '75.
posted by Strange Interlude at 9:31 AM on March 16, 2015 [2 favorites]


I guess I must be old now, because what? Really? There's a band called "Diarrhea Planet"?

Yes. I think they were the opening act for Butthole Surfers.
posted by Ratio at 9:34 AM on March 16, 2015 [3 favorites]


Electioneering is a really really great song.

Completely this. Back in 2012 over at MeFiMu we did the OK Computer cover project and I was assigned "Electioneering". I actually was kind of bummed about it, I was really hoping to get "Lucky" or "Karma Police". But no, I got the one song I hadn't really ever listened to that closely on the whole album.

So I dove in, intent to really learn the song really well so's I could cover it.*

I think it turned out to be one of the best pieces of music I've ever done. I learned a lot from it. It's a terrific song: great lyrics, great structure, just a really fantastic, well-written song.

Here, you can have a listen to my cover version over on MeFiMu if you're interested.

And here's the whole OK Computer Project playlist.

Alos, here's every MeFiMu track with a "radiohead" tag.

posted by Doleful Creature at 9:41 AM on March 16, 2015 [3 favorites]


On a sunny day my answer might be the Toots and the Maytals cover of "Let Down".
posted by RobotVoodooPower at 9:53 AM on March 16, 2015 [3 favorites]


i do not like radiohead
not because i do not like their music
i am not going to discuss my aesthetic reaction to their music
i might like some of it, i might not. you don't care, & why should you.

no.

i do not like radiohead because of jonny greenwood
he wrote 'popcorn superhet receiver', a contemporary classical piece
it was widely praised
i am not going to discuss my aesthetic reaction to that music either
but it is profoundly irritating
when one is trying to research popcorn superhet receivers
which are actual things of some interest to such as i
and which predate jonny greenwoods career in contemporary classical music
and where one presumes he got the name
no, when one tries to research these
all one finds
for page after page of google
is people battering on about jonny greenwood
and not real popcorn superhet receivers

i cannot forgive that, & why should i
posted by Devonian at 9:59 AM on March 16, 2015 [10 favorites]


Tycho's entry was magical. I mean it - I've had experiences with music just like he described and I've never been high in my life.
posted by davebush at 10:00 AM on March 16, 2015


Seconding blucevalo: no "Everything in its Right Place"? Good lord. That thing is transcendent.

So the main winners seem to be Electioneering, Kid A, Codex and...Pyramid Song? Mostly off Kid A. Agree.
posted by gottabefunky at 10:01 AM on March 16, 2015 [1 favorite]


Pyramid Song is one of the best songs by anyone ever.
posted by saul wright at 10:08 AM on March 16, 2015 [6 favorites]


On a sunny day my answer might be the Toots and the Maytals cover of "Let Down".

Whoa this sounds cool and neat and I like it!
posted by resurrexit at 10:10 AM on March 16, 2015 [2 favorites]


Looking through the list again and the comments here and over at Stereogum, I'm kind of sad now that no one has mentioned "Supercollider."
posted by Sonny Jim at 10:23 AM on March 16, 2015


I'd have to re-explore the discography since it's been a while, but my immediate choice was "True Love Waits." It's so simple compared to all the esoteric fuckery they're into, but it cuts right to the bone. Nothing else in their catalogue is capable of ripping my heart out like that one.
posted by naju at 10:39 AM on March 16, 2015 [3 favorites]


I'm surprised so many people picked "All I Need." "Videotape" is where it's at for me. (And here is a lovely all piano live version.) Also oh my god In Rainbows is seven years old?! I am getting so old.

Everyone who picked "Idioteque" is also correct, though I am admittedly biased because that was the song that had me going, "Oh. So that's what the big deal is about Radiohead."
posted by yasaman at 10:50 AM on March 16, 2015


In Rainbows is seven years old?! I am getting so old.

I've reached a place where everything seems like it happened about 5 years ago, whether it was actually last month or 20 years since it did. It's dreamy.
posted by thelonius at 10:56 AM on March 16, 2015 [6 favorites]


I'm surprised that nobody picked "Lucky".

If an artist I didn't recognize had picked "Lucky", I would have looked up their music and given it a serious listen.
posted by A dead Quaker at 10:58 AM on March 16, 2015 [1 favorite]


The moment in "There There" when Yorke starts singing "we are accidents waiting to happen" made me gasp the first time I heard it. Beautiful, chilling and lyrically perfect.

Oh and "Exit Music (for a film)."
posted by Joey Michaels at 11:04 AM on March 16, 2015 [7 favorites]


Man, I would be hard pressed to pick just one song aswell. Aside from 'Creep' I don't think I've heard anything off Pablo Honey in about 15 years, but I could just as easily pick 'You' or 'Anyone Can Play Guitar' for the 'heard-it as a 13-year old factor' if nothing else, although 'Street Spirit' from the Bends probably had a bigger impact on me around that time and was probably the music video I most looked forward to coning on when watching random stuff on MTV.

I remember being blown away when 'Paranoid Android' was released, but I was more drawn to 'Lucky'. Kid A is still one of my favorite albums and I might have gone with 'The National Anthem', 'Everything in it's Right Place' or 'Idiotheque' and was confused when people were turned off by that album.

Before this turns into TWR lists his favorite songs from each Radiohead album, my point is that I grew up musically with Radiohead. I felt like I got what they were doing with each new album, It always felt like the right step and while I still loved the old stuff, I was ready to move on with them. I had new favorite song(s) with each release, so looking back on 20+ years of stellar work, it seems impossible to me pick just one as each favorite was just right for me at that time.
posted by TwoWordReview at 11:28 AM on March 16, 2015


This seems like a good place to plug MetaFilter's very own Lutoslawski's cover of Airbag, which was so goddamned awesome that it made me go listen to the album again after a five-year hiatus from Radiohead.
posted by Mayor West at 11:33 AM on March 16, 2015 [2 favorites]


How can the lines

I keep the wolf at the door,
but he calls me up.
Calls me on the phone
tells me all the ways
that he's gonna mess me up

not get any love?
posted by pjenks at 11:47 AM on March 16, 2015 [4 favorites]


That one guy who listens to "How to Disappear Completely" to get happy. What.
posted by papayaninja at 11:47 AM on March 16, 2015 [1 favorite]


I get that. I used to listen to The Cure's Disintegration to get over break ups. Sometimes it helps listen to bleak but lovely music.
posted by Joey Michaels at 11:53 AM on March 16, 2015 [1 favorite]


All these people are wrong. Except one guy.

And that guy is, somehow, through some ineffable cosmic accident, purely by walking through the wrong door, entirely by aiming for the precise opposite of the hit target, for reasons no one will understand (least of all the man himself), Noel Gallagher.

But in all seriousness, I can relate a lot to Skrillex's and J Mascis'. The Bends is my favorite Radiohead album, but I pretty much love Pablo Honey (just a really good pop album) and OK Computer (just the right amount between good pop and the later weird schizophrenia anthems) about equally, for different reasons. A lot of that was timing: earlier pre-navelgaze Radiohead is pretty much perfect teenager music.

Kid A grew on me slowly, but I felt initially pretty burned by it because I fell for the (in hindsight, hilarious) trollish overhyped MTV2 debut of playing the album just, like, in a room with Johnny Greenwood sitting at a computer sometimes. "How to Disappear Completely" and "Motion Picture Soundtrack" are really lovely songs, though. I love weird, spacey music but I feel like the albums from Kid A onward started a bad trend of having one or two really great tracks with a bunch of lacklustre filler. For whatever reason, a lot of my favorite Radiohead songs are unreleased/B side things closer to the previous style like "True Love Waits," "Stupid Car" and "Talk Show Host." I liked The Eraser a fair bit at the time, but rarely get a desire to listen to it again.

Also, Anyone Can Play Radiohead was worth buying just for Silent Gray's incredible full reworking of "Fitter/Happier." Which is basically the canonical version of the song, in my head.
posted by byanyothername at 12:15 PM on March 16, 2015 [2 favorites]


I've talked about it here before, but my favorite track by far is the opener to OK Computer, "Airbag." Not just from Radiohead, but from any band. Soaring, complex, transcendent, rich with detail, even euphoric -- but with a subtle undercurrent of dread. A perfect introduction to the album.

Context really helps. Yorke was in a pretty serious car accident with his girlfriend when he was younger, and he's harbored a fear of cars ever since (see e.g. "Killer Cars"). That experience underlies a lot of the album's songwriting -- the fear of technology, the devaluing of humanity, a pervading sense of existential angst and life wasted.

Airbag turns that dynamic inside-out, into something earnest and beautiful.

Picture the scene: There's been a terrible accident on a wintry nighttime road, a flipped car, a jack-knifed 18-wheeler, the apocalyptic sound of metal on metal (echoed by the warped screech of the guitar). A survivor, shaken but unhurt, wanders in a daze towards the neon-lit roadside -- feeling not the shock of trauma, but a pure, exhilarating joy.

Phil Selway put it this way:
It's about the wonderful, positive emotion you feel when you've just failed to have an accident; when you just miss someone and realise how close it was and stop the car and just feel this incredible elation. There's something joyous about it - life suddenly seems more precious.
And Yorke himself:
Has an airbag saved my life? Nah... but I tell you something, every time you have a near accident, instead of just sighing and carrying on, you should pull over, get out of the car and run down the street screaming, 'I'm BACK! I'm ALIVE! My life has started again today!'. In fact, you should do that every time you get out of a car.
When that exultant "I am back to save the universe!" sentiment gives way to the cosmic swirl of echoing electronica towards the end, buoying a swelling chorus of blissful sighs all the way to the crashing coda -- that's one of my favorite and most inspiring moments in modern music.

Even a negative review of the song, by Italian critic Piero Scaruffi, can't help but reflect its best qualities:
A psalm warbled in middle-eastern fashion while the guitar strums a raga, a cello fills the harmony with menacing drones, and the drums beat mechanic and synchopated. This tedious litany sets the theme for the rest of the album: Radiohead bridges the Beatles' Sgt Pepper (more precisely The Benefit Of Mr Kite) and latter-day Pink Floyd, chic pop and languid, transcendental living-room psychedelia.
Musically, I never get tired of listening. "Paranoid Android" was my first OKC favorite, then "Let Down," but "Airbag" has stuck with me for far longer. Nigel Godrich's production is so deeply layered -- sprinkly sleighbells, groaning reversed cellos, angelic mellotron choirs, the clouds of glitchy effects -- not to mention Jonny's lurching guitar line, Colin's unpredictably oscillating bass, O'Brien's satisfying riffs, and Selway's kickass cut-up percussion (inspired by DJ Shadow). And Yorke's impassioned voice soaring throughout. It's like a sonic relay race, each element giving way to the next unpredictably yet gracefully.

And yet, the track is just as good stripped all the way down to acoustic and vocals.

(Other great covers: Lutoslawki's, as mentioned upthread - a great guitar-only cover - a fun heavy metal take - a virtuoso piano cover on the streets of Paris - an acoustic version with Bruddah Iz vibes)

Speaking of acoustic:

naju: "I'd have to re-explore the discography since it's been a while, but my immediate choice was "True Love Waits." It's so simple compared to all the esoteric fuckery they're into, but it cuts right to the bone. Nothing else in their catalogue is capable of ripping my heart out like that one."

You'd probably love "Gagging Order" (A Hail to the Thief B-side) and Yorke's acoustic rendition of Atoms for Peace's "Ingenue" -- which was moving enough that it's been used in at least one MeFite's wedding.

yasaman: "Also oh my god In Rainbows is seven years old?! I am getting so old."

FWIW, the FPP link was prompted by the 20th anniversary of The Bends a few days ago...
posted by Rhaomi at 12:40 PM on March 16, 2015 [8 favorites]


I'm surprised that nobody picked "Lucky".

Because I'm a RadioheadSuperNerd! I know that "Lucky" is Michael Stipe's fave Radiohead song, and that's why Radiohead always play it whenever he's at a show.

I personally could never just pick one. If I was forced to pick a top three, it'd be: How to Disappear Completely, I Might Be Wrong, and Let Down.

This month, at least.
posted by Windigo at 12:42 PM on March 16, 2015


This is great. I like stuff on every album, but OK Computer is probably my favorite and feels the most like a timeless classic. I know a few people who were stuck in "classic rock" world and thought nothing new was as good as Dark Side of the Moon (for example) but got a revived interest in new music because of OKC.

I couldn't deal with The Eraser though. Someone gave it to me and I tried and tried but just ... yuck. No. Borrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrring. Goodwill has it now.
posted by freecellwizard at 1:59 PM on March 16, 2015 [1 favorite]


I'm pleasantly surprised a couple people picked "All I Need" since it's probably what I would have answered here as well. (That, or "Idioteque," mainly because it sounds like it could have been a collaboration with Ae circa Anvil Vapre.)
posted by en forme de poire at 3:48 PM on March 16, 2015 [1 favorite]


As someone who lost the plot with Radiohead after Kid A, I'm kind of amazed at how many of those songs come to mind when I first think of what my favourite track might be—Optimistic, The National Anthem, Everything In Its Right Place, but Idioteque far above them all. But really, for me it's no contest: Electioneering is the one I always come back to.

I, too, love the fact that Kathleen Hanna is all "I liked Radiohead when they weren't weird, man."
posted by chrominance at 4:29 PM on March 16, 2015 [1 favorite]


It'd be hard for me to rank Radiohead songs, but ever since I learned about the reputed story behind it, "Wolf at the Door" off "Hail to the Thief" always gets me. Imagine going back to visit your home town after achieving Radiohead levels of international acclaim only to get beaten up by the same thugs who used to beat you up as a kid just for having had the gall to make something of your life. Chokes me up every damn time. Not even sure if the story's true, but it feels true enough.
posted by saulgoodman at 6:29 PM on March 16, 2015 [2 favorites]


"Black Star," definitely.
posted by thivaia at 6:56 PM on March 16, 2015 [1 favorite]


I have to stop myself from liking every other comment on this thread and just say something myself, even if I've probably arrived pretty late and don't have much to add.

I don't go as far as not liking anything after Kid A, but I'm pretty sympathetic to the idea that the first few records have the best songwriting on them (with some awesome exceptions).

I just want to post some links:







and maybe my favorite of all:

posted by O. Bender at 9:26 PM on March 16, 2015


Has no one mentioned Iron Lung?!? That and No Surprises are my two long-term favorites, in large part because I find them extremely satisfying to sing along.
posted by msali at 9:28 PM on March 16, 2015 [1 favorite]


What, no one picked "Just" from "The Bends" ? No one at all? oh well...
posted by Sintram at 10:22 PM on March 16, 2015 [2 favorites]


Like Spinning Plates

Pyramid Song

True Love Waits

But really, I love most of their albums (especially OK and after) and their music has been my soundtrack of choice for most of my 20s. If I had to choose a favourite band, Radiohead would be it.

As an exchange student in London in 2000/20001, my roommate and I would go to bed listening to Kid A every. single. night. We arrived in London a week or two before it was released.
posted by flippant at 11:24 PM on March 16, 2015


I remember getting Ok Computer and just loathing it. I didn't understand what all the fuss was about, I wanted my money back. I felt really misled and cheated. But somehow I didn't chuck it in the bin, and listened to it again. It grew on me, bit by bit, mostly because of Let Down (which remains one of my all-time favourites of theirs, most especially for the line "sentimental drivel" which makes me think of Diana Wynne Jones and snigger). I completely agree with Ed Droste, though I have never heard of him or his band before; though the lyrics express hopelessness and despair, the music tells you a different story: though now he is crushed like a bug in the ground, one day he is gonna grow wings.

Then Kid A came out and it blew me away. It was just amazing. I listened to it over and over. I remember after a long, hellish flight from Sydney to Vienna, being utterly exhausted but unable to sleep and just lying down on my hotel bed with Kid A on and it was completely soothing in an odd kind of way. Mind you, I have a lot of trouble working out the lyrics on that one so for me it's about the music. If I could pick only one Radiohead album to keep for all time, it would be that one. Fortunately I don't have to pick.

I seem to have most of the albums after Kid B Amnesiac but have never binge-played them the way I did with Kid A. I have binge-played a few songs, though, and I am pleased that All I Need made it on the list several times. Even if some people seem to think it's a love song, which it is not.
posted by Athanassiel at 11:45 PM on March 16, 2015 [1 favorite]


Warning to anyone else who is curious about Toots and the Maytals version of Let Down: it is a reggae version. If this makes you want to run screaming from the room, you have been warned. I wish I had been.
posted by Athanassiel at 11:53 PM on March 16, 2015


Every few years I come across an album that I listen to with a weird, voracious obsession that crowds out everything else. Every day for about six months I have to find an excuse to listen to it. Eventually the infatuation fades, but the creator has entered a pantheon of people who I don't really bother with critically any more - rating their new record out of whatever would be as crass as giving a formal assessment to a friend you've met up with in a bar. When I was younger, there were too many to mention, but the stream has slowed somewhat in the last thirty years. In 2002, it was Cardiacs' Sing to God; in 2009 it was Actor by St Vincent; the following year Mega Breakfast by The Chap; last year it was Karuki Zamen Kuri no hana by Shiina Ringo.

Radiohead are one of the few bands who did it more than once - with OK Computer when it came out, and then with Kid A. Everything since then I've bought in the fancy packaging version when it came out and listened to a lot more than I do most new albums, but it's not quite the same. Which is OK, more of that obsession directed to one place would be unhealthy.

There were sort of three stages to finding Radiohead for me - perhaps four, if you include the preamble of seeing their videos on The Chart Show and not being that impressed. And then one Sunday I had the TV on, watching Channel 4 (they were running Babylon 5 around that time, which I always enjoyed for the aesthetic, but I had no idea what on earth was going on), and it was the TV show that tied in with the War Child album, and there among the slightly dull cover versions was Radiohead recording Lucky, something so extraordinary and compelling that I might have forgotten how to breath in there somewhere.

At which point I ought to have run out and bought their back catalogue (Pablo Honey and The Bends), but I didn't. I was particularly unmotivated in the mid-nineties.

By early 2007 I was temping in a design agency, where the office stereo (in most offices the weapon of choice with which the alpha dogs of the studio berated the rest of us and the main reason I despise club house music) had one speaker next to where I was sitting and the other inaudible on the opposite side of the room. In the run up to OK Computer, they pulled out The Bends (which had, evidently, been the office favourite two years earlier), and after hearing it a few times I decided I should go out and get it, and I really liked it. Then one of the copywriters who was the star blagger got a prerelease tape of OK Computer, about two months before it came out. And the day it came out I went to the Our Price on Upper Street in Islington and bought it, and took it home and listened to it and from the first notes of Airbag was completely transported. I'd heard it before, of course, but I'd only heard half of it. The left half. Hearing both halves was a completely different experience.

And then a couple of years later Kid A came out. I don't have much to say about that other than that for one of very few occasions I found it easier to put the disc on repeat play than repeated pressing the play button. And of course it took me six months to find the booklet like everyone else.

(If you haven't found the booklet in Kid A, you need to take out the plastic tray and there it is. I think it's one of my favourite packaging decisions of all time.)

I listened to The Bends again a few weeks ago after several years. It's a remarkable record, and I was struck by the fact that several bands (notably Coldplay) have taken the less challenging fragments of The Bends and OK Computer and spun them out into superstar careers.
posted by Grangousier at 3:02 AM on March 17, 2015 [2 favorites]


Fake Plastic Trees for me, forever and forever.
posted by onlyconnect at 8:55 PM on March 17, 2015


Warning to anyone else who is curious about Toots and the Maytals version of Let Down: it is a reggae version. If this makes you want to run screaming from the room, you have been warned. I wish I had been.

It's from the Radiodread album. I remember really enjoying that album.
posted by Dr-Baa at 11:44 AM on March 19, 2015


What, no one picked "Just" from "The Bends" ? No one at all? oh well...

The brief clean guitar solo in "Just" (with the pause and squeal of distortion that come right after it) is one of the most perfect things ever recorded.
posted by nebulawindphone at 11:54 AM on March 19, 2015


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