In Israel: casual dress, handle business cards with respect.
July 6, 2015 10:28 AM   Subscribe

 
In my culture, when given a business card it's important to take it with both hands, then take out a lighter and set it on fire, never breaking eye contact.
posted by Solon and Thanks at 10:32 AM on July 6, 2015 [53 favorites]


I love how the infographic just blithely assumes "business card ritual" is a concept that's not going to stop us cold while we crack up and make fun of it. Of course, my strong conviction that the literature, customs, and values of Business Person Culture are profoundly silly is probably why I'm not sickeningly wealthy.
posted by prize bull octorok at 10:37 AM on July 6, 2015 [4 favorites]


I don't really understand what "handle with respect" means for a business card, so I choose to imagine something like courtiers prostrating before an imperial missive from the Son of Heaven.
posted by poffin boffin at 10:39 AM on July 6, 2015 [7 favorites]


That's Bone. And the lettering is something called Silian Rail.
posted by scose at 10:40 AM on July 6, 2015 [20 favorites]


I'm delighted to know that I can address everyone in Canada as Liam or Olivia. That will simplify things a great deal.
posted by neroli at 10:42 AM on July 6, 2015 [56 favorites]


"To the point of bluntness."
posted by box at 10:48 AM on July 6, 2015 [5 favorites]


Honestly, I'm shocked that there are countries where the meeting agenda is anything more than a gentle suggestion.
posted by Maastrictian at 10:48 AM on July 6, 2015 [2 favorites]


I did some googling re: business card rituals

1. RECEIVE WITH BOTH HANDS
2. PLACE ON TONGUE, LET IT DISSOLVE, DON'T CHEW wait I'm sorry that's communion wafers
3. MAKE SURE THE WRITING IS FACING THE RECIPIENT
4. COMMENT ON THE BUSINESS CARD "My stars, Signor Fleeceworth-Pantherbelt, but the edges on your business card are sharp. May I ask where you source your fonts?"
5. PLACE BUSINESS CARD IN A CONSERVATIVE LEATHER CASE
6. WHEN PERFORMING POST-BUSINESS-DEAL DRUNKEN KARAOKE, TAKE OUT BUSINESS CARD, SING TOUCHING ROMANTIC BALLAD TO IT
7. YOU MUST PURCHASE THE BUSINESS CARD ITS OWN FIRST CLASS AIRPLANE SEAT ON THE FLIGHT HOME; FAILURE TO DO SO IS CONSIDERED GRAVELY RUDE IN MANY COUNTRIES AND WILL SOUR YOUR IMPORTANT BUSINESS DEAL
8. STRIP TO WAIST, CARRY BUSINESS CARD INTO THE WOODS, CAPERING AND CHANTING IN DEAD LANGUAGE
9. HOLD LOWER CORNERS OF BUSINESS CARD WITH THUMB AND FOREFINGER; LAY UPON ALTAR OF TSATHOGGUA
10. AS UNEARTHLY GREEN FLAME CONSUMES BUSINESS CARD, RECITE THE SEVEN HABITS OF HIGHLY EFFECTIVE PEOPLE
11. ACHIEVE TERRIFYING BUSINESS-APOTHEOSIS; ASCEND TO EXECUTIVE SUITE
posted by prize bull octorok at 10:49 AM on July 6, 2015 [54 favorites]


Wow this is riddled with inaccuracies. Pretty much everything for Ireland is wrong. Dress code is pretty casual, we have loads of chit-chat before meetings, interruptions are just fine, and our communication style is very indirect and often confuses visitors.
posted by Not on your nellie at 10:49 AM on July 6, 2015 [6 favorites]


I don't really understand what "handle with respect" means for a business card

It means filing it carefully away after you are done using it to clean under your fingernails.
posted by peeedro at 10:49 AM on July 6, 2015 [5 favorites]


I don't really understand what "handle with respect" means for a business card, so I choose to imagine something like courtiers prostrating before an imperial missive from the Son of Heaven.
poffin boffin

For Japan, it means not doing things like folding them, writing on them, or jamming them in your pocket or wallet (you should have a business card holder). When you receive a card, you don't just put it away immediately, you look it over for a moment and then give a polite phrase of thanks. If you're joining a meeting, you then arrange the cards you received on the table in the seating order of the people around you, or if it's one one one you place the other person's card on top of your card holder on the table in front of you.
posted by Sangermaine at 10:49 AM on July 6, 2015 [12 favorites]


I think this is a neat idea but the execution is a bit off. Also, it turns out we only do business in a very limited number of countries! I was surprised! I really thought places like Argentina and Laos probably had business too but I guess I was wrong!
posted by Mrs. Pterodactyl at 10:53 AM on July 6, 2015 [4 favorites]


Now if someone could tell me what to do with those hundreds of my own business cards that I've been issued over the last twenty years and never knew what they were for.
posted by octothorpe at 10:53 AM on July 6, 2015 [3 favorites]


what if you got confused and gave a light handshake in a firm handshake country, dressed sharp in a casual country, and received a business card with both hands in a no ritual country? would the deal not go through? do these rules apply to criminal business? is there a correlation between or among any of these things?
posted by ChuckRamone at 10:55 AM on July 6, 2015 [1 favorite]


In France, apologising for not being able to speak French may be a good way to start business communications.

What can I do if I do speak French?
posted by Segundus at 10:56 AM on July 6, 2015 [5 favorites]


Apologize for your Quebecois accent.
posted by Midnight Skulker at 10:59 AM on July 6, 2015 [50 favorites]


That awkward moment when you give someone your business card and they silently put it in their pocket without first doing a line off of it

No China or Mexico? What kind of business are these people doing?
posted by phooky at 10:59 AM on July 6, 2015 [6 favorites]


You must then apologize for not being French, if applicable.
posted by poffin boffin at 10:59 AM on July 6, 2015 [12 favorites]


Seriously, though, I really like charts like this that display similarities and differences but there are people who dedicate their entire careers to studying this and helping others adapt. International business etiquette is definitely not this simple. It's a kind of cool chart but it's super simplistic and basically no one who's actually doing business in any of these places is going to use something this basic. If it's just for the fun and edification of people like me who are never going to be in this situation, I'd sort of like more information and a greater variety of countries (like, for example, ANYWHERE IN AFRICA would have been nice).

Actually one of the most interesting things to me would be a list of things that vary from country to country. For example, I'm not surprised that clothing varies, but what else does? Location for conducting business would be one, maybe? That would fascinate me! Do you meet in an office? At a restaurant? Office for business restaurant for celebration afterwards? Are people expected to drink or not drink? Is there food in the meetings? If so, are you supposed to eat it or will everyone think it's weird? I feel like I've been to a lot of meetings where there are muffins or something on the table but you're not supposed to eat them. Does that happen other places? I think the categories were actually more interesting to me than the countries.

In conclusion, I love very little more than structural analysis of cultural differences but this did not provide them to the extent I was hoping.
posted by Mrs. Pterodactyl at 11:01 AM on July 6, 2015 [6 favorites]


wtf? Casual chitchat before meetings is ultra-common in Canada.
posted by feckless fecal fear mongering at 11:01 AM on July 6, 2015 [3 favorites]


do these rules apply to criminal business?

you will need to refer to ponyatiya which will be slightly different if you are vory or not.
posted by poffin boffin at 11:03 AM on July 6, 2015 [3 favorites]


BTW CT is not Connecticut in this context.
posted by smackfu at 11:04 AM on July 6, 2015 [1 favorite]


Be prepared to sing a solo karaoke number after dinner.

You best be serving large quantities of strong drink with dinner, or I'll be insulting you.
posted by Splunge at 11:07 AM on July 6, 2015


PLACE ON TONGUE, LET IT DISSOLVE, DON'T CHEW wait I'm sorry that's communion wafers

or blotter acid
posted by TedW at 11:09 AM on July 6, 2015 [10 favorites]


What can I do if I do speak French?

Don't be a show off and stick to a language everyone in the room can understand.
posted by three blind mice at 11:10 AM on July 6, 2015


I'm guessing in France that might just be French, depending
posted by feckless fecal fear mongering at 11:11 AM on July 6, 2015 [8 favorites]


I would like a country where people are indirect, smiley, smartly dressed, don't like interruptions and follow agendas but enjoy social chit-chat before mettings and do neither karaoke nor serious drinking in a business context. Also, no two-hour lunches for business purposes; that sounds like the lunch habit of the damned.
posted by Frowner at 11:12 AM on July 6, 2015 [6 favorites]


I'm kind of surprised that "different places have different etiquette that you should be mindful of" is getting so much LOL in this thread.
posted by Sangermaine at 11:13 AM on July 6, 2015 [9 favorites]


TedW: " PLACE ON TONGUE, LET IT DISSOLVE, DON'T CHEW wait I'm sorry that's communion wafers

or blotter acid
"

If your blotter dissolves it's a sugar cube.
posted by Splunge at 11:13 AM on July 6, 2015


PLACE BUSINESS CARD IN A CONSERVATIVE LEATHER CASE

One of the coolest gifts I've ever received on a business trip, was from some friends in Korea---a gorgeous stainless steel and abalone shell card case (like the ones at this Etsy shop). My collaborators there felt the old leather one I used up until then wasn't impressive enough. They were doing me a favour, and bringing an uncultured Canadian up to snuff.

They were right. It's one of my secret weapons when the fucking corporate Patrick Batemans and their fucking tasteful black-brown leather wallets force me to swap paper.
posted by bonehead at 11:14 AM on July 6, 2015 [10 favorites]


Now if someone could tell me what to do with those hundreds of my own business cards that I've been issued over the last twenty years and never knew what they were for.

I'm not sure but I think those are for getting into the free food drawings at local lunch spots.
posted by ckape at 11:16 AM on July 6, 2015 [12 favorites]


octothorpe: Now if someone could tell me what to do with those hundreds of my own business cards that I've been issued over the last twenty years and never knew what they were for.

I've spent the last 15 years trying to figure out how to monetize the world's billions of unused business cards, because most people who are provided with a box of 1000 cards is lucky to use even 50 of them before the contact info goes out of date. I could make millions!
posted by usonian at 11:21 AM on July 6, 2015 [3 favorites]


I'm almost 42 years old and I've only had one job that required me to have a business card. I kind of wish I'd kept one (and hopefully there will never be another) as a souvenir.
posted by The Card Cheat at 11:28 AM on July 6, 2015 [1 favorite]


Now if someone could tell me what to do with those hundreds of my own business cards that I've been issued over the last twenty years and never knew what they were for.

Going by the totally ridiculous amounts I had to order for my former boss over the years, you are supposed to just fling fistfuls of them into the air wherever you go at all times.
posted by poffin boffin at 11:30 AM on July 6, 2015 [29 favorites]


You worked for Rob Ford???
posted by The Card Cheat at 11:32 AM on July 6, 2015 [4 favorites]


...there are people who dedicate their entire careers to studying this and helping others adapt. International business etiquette is definitely not this simple.

I'm one of them (sort of), and you're right -- international business etiquette isn't this simple. However, these sorts of friendly-looking visuals do have purpose. They're a digestible read for people who don't think they need the information -- which can sometimes mean they need it even more.

International business etiquette has close ties to international cultural etiquette overall. If you think business card ritual is ridiculous...keep in mind that somewhere on this planet, someone thinks it's just as ridiculous that you expect meetings and parties to start on time.
posted by gnomeloaf at 11:34 AM on July 6, 2015 [12 favorites]


I'm delighted to know that I can address everyone in Canada as Liam Gordon or Olivia.

FTFY.
posted by ZenMasterThis at 11:41 AM on July 6, 2015 [4 favorites]


Now if someone could tell me what to do with those hundreds of my own business cards that I've been issued over the last twenty years and never knew what they were for.

They make good shims.
posted by ROU_Xenophobe at 11:43 AM on July 6, 2015 [3 favorites]


I've spent the last 15 years trying to figure out how to monetize the world's billions of unused business cards, because most people who are provided with a box of 1000 cards is lucky to use even 50 of them before the contact info goes out of date. I could make millions

I nestle mine down in the bottom right corner of my computer monitor to hide Outlook notifications I'd rather not see right away.
posted by Bulgaroktonos at 11:46 AM on July 6, 2015 [12 favorites]


The fact that Germany's communication style had to be qualified with "to the point of bluntness" makes me want to do business with more Germans.
posted by griphus at 11:48 AM on July 6, 2015 [13 favorites]


> Now if someone could tell me what to do with those hundreds of my own business cards that I've been issued over the last twenty years and never knew what they were for.

Business card cubes!
posted by cardioid at 11:58 AM on July 6, 2015 [3 favorites]


Also nothing turns me from Omniscient Administratron 5000 into Vincent Adultman faster than non-business small talk.

"Can you file a 55-E without having the 2X backer?"
"Only if you include the notarized ZQ-22 with a copy of your license."
"Will it need to go under department review?"
"Not if you check off box 7 in section 53."
"Great, thank you. How was your fourth of July?"
"I had a good fourth. Of July. There was a sun and I ate two hamburger and a beer can."
posted by griphus at 12:07 PM on July 6, 2015 [37 favorites]


I just say we're out of business cards and stamp our store's contact info on a receipt #bizlazy
posted by Foci for Analysis at 12:07 PM on July 6, 2015


And if cash is needed - maybe withdraw it before arriving in Israel
posted by rosswald at 12:22 PM on July 6, 2015 [9 favorites]


The fact that Germany's communication style had to be qualified with "to the point of bluntness" makes me want to do business with more Germans.

That note reminds me of this comment from the Karl Lagerfeld thread. I wonder how much of the famed German Efficiency can be chalked up to low bullshit tolerance.
posted by theodolite at 12:26 PM on July 6, 2015 [3 favorites]


I was surprised there was no section for China, or is it to big to be classified?
posted by boilermonster at 12:36 PM on July 6, 2015


Now if someone could tell me what to do with those hundreds of my own business cards that I've been issued over the last twenty years and never knew what they were for.

Business card cubes!


I will see your business card cubes and raise you a business card menger sponge - I built a small one with old business cards when I received a new set (of 200! I had used 5 in the past 2 previous years).
posted by combinatorial explosion at 12:36 PM on July 6, 2015 [2 favorites]


Laugh about business card etiquette if you want, I guess, but when the people you're trying to do business with seem to think you're an arrogant dick and you can't figure out why, can't help you. It's the little things.

That said, having travelled with the military, some of the "cultural orientation briefs" I've been subjected to have been laughably inaccurate to the point of being worse to follow than not. There's a difference between respecting cultural norms and conspicuously treating people like wacky foreign curiosities.
posted by ctmf at 12:40 PM on July 6, 2015 [6 favorites]


Netherlands?
posted by bukvich at 12:46 PM on July 6, 2015


Yeah, what ctmf said. Y'all are very clever, but it is good to be polite.

I would observe that there is business and business. I work in a small computing sector. My wife works in a major finance multinational. We have quite different business codes, including dress.
posted by alasdair at 12:47 PM on July 6, 2015 [5 favorites]


Dave: Sir, I've eaten with you dozens of times, and your table manners are fine.
Jimmy: No they are NOT fine! Listen to me. I've spent years cultivating the worst table manners on the planet.
Dave: Excuse me?
Jimmy: You don't get it, do you?
Dave: No, but... you know, I've grown accustomed to that.
Jimmy: It's an old business ploy. You intimidate the guy you're dealing with by eating like a slob.
Dave: And... that's effective?
Jimmy: Oh, hell, yes. I've cut millions off of deals by eating baked beans with my hands.
posted by griphus at 12:51 PM on July 6, 2015 [5 favorites]


I'd be pretty interested in learning about the prevalence of business cards, as well as other personal cards that may be used. I've seen the trading of cards in a non-business setting in media. Perhaps if this international customs piece didn't focus on something that's considered trivial/managerial in America, it wouldn't have gotten so much snark?
posted by halifix at 12:53 PM on July 6, 2015


If you're joining a meeting, you then arrange the cards you received on the table in the seating order of the people around you

This would actually be super-helpful and I kinda wish it was common in the US. (Although it'd be an epic waste of paper.) Most people I know don't have business cards anymore, unless they're in sales or recruitment.
posted by Kadin2048 at 1:04 PM on July 6, 2015 [1 favorite]


Business cards are useful, and I haven't really seen a good replacement for them. I'm not quite sure why they've gone away in some fields in the US. When you're meeting with a lot of people, it's awkward and slow to have to ask each person to put their info in your phone, or write it down. IR tech or QR codes never caught on in the US, so getting a card with the person's name and info is the easiest way. Then you have a reminder of who you talked to, and all their contact info.

What do people who work in fields that don't use cards do when you have to meet large groups of new people?
posted by Sangermaine at 1:24 PM on July 6, 2015


It would even be nice to see "personal cards" or whatever they're called come back. If you're out in a casual situation, for the same reasons as above, you could easily exchange personal contact info with a card.
posted by Sangermaine at 1:25 PM on July 6, 2015 [3 favorites]


Calling cards. Nothing fancy, just some nice copperplate on high-rag cardstock.
posted by Mogur at 1:30 PM on July 6, 2015 [1 favorite]


What do people who work in fields that don't use cards do when you have to meet large groups of new people?

I think that most of the people who are anti-business card aren't in jobs that have them meet a lot of new people regularly. Among my friends, there's a strong overlap between people who think business cards are worthless and people who think LinkedIn is worthless. Yeah, they can both be annoying in many ways (LinkedIn more so), but it's amazingly useful to be able to find the name of that guy I met at a conference five years ago who now works for a company I need a contact at. Networking isn't a pointless exercise, it's amazingly useful if you do it right. And both business cards and LinkedIn are very helpful tools for networking and actually retaining the information for longer than 15 minutes.
posted by primethyme at 1:54 PM on July 6, 2015 [5 favorites]


I don't think the "pre-business chitchat" bit refers to whether it's common to talk about the weather for 5 minutes before getting started, but whether starting promptly on the meeting agenda would be outright rude.

I had to get accustomed to meetings with Japanese clients taking 2-3 times as long as I thought, as it would literally be close to an hour of polite small talk before we would get to the point. Before someone told me it was customary, I thought I was being jerked around.

(The business card thing was also valuable to be taught; at least it looks like I'm trying now.)
posted by nev at 1:58 PM on July 6, 2015 [2 favorites]


It's funny; I just plowed through Sense8 on Netflix, and one of the things that jumped out at me in the first episode was how casually Sun (an executive in a Korean company) treated the business card of a Chinese partner. She took it with one hand and barely glanced at it! It's gotta be a huge challenge to get the culture right in a show with eight main characters, most of them from different countries.
posted by Edgewise at 2:11 PM on July 6, 2015 [2 favorites]


The fact that Germany's communication style had to be qualified with "to the point of bluntness" makes me want to do business with more Germans.

Careful politeness and lack of directness is my defense mechanism in unclear situations. I then moved to Germany.

It took me over six months to realise that my co-workers weren't angry all the time.

It took them over a year to realise that me saying, "Hmm, I'm not sure I'd suggest doing it that way" was of equal stress to "Well, that's a stupid plan."

I went to the same bakery every few days. My first few times there, I tried to ask variants on, "Hi, if it wouldn't be too much of a bother, I'd like a half loaf of the onion bread, please." By about the third visit, I got met with, "Just say what the fuck you want already!"

On the other hand, blunt directness means that it's rare that you're not sure where you stand with people, as, if there's a problem, you'll be told. If there's a serious problem, you'll be told loudly.
posted by frimble at 2:16 PM on July 6, 2015 [25 favorites]


I lived in Germany for four years and I thought the whole country was angry at me all the time. Even when you know it's just a cultural difference, it's hard not to feel battered by it.
posted by lollusc at 3:17 PM on July 6, 2015 [3 favorites]


Protip:* When preparing for an important meeting with a representative of a company you've never done business with before... Find a business card from the company from another contact... Print up your own business cards with your name and their company and logo, matching identically. Give yourself a title significantly higher than the person you're meeting with.

*this may actually be not a great idea for helping your meeting go well, but I assure you, it will result in a story you'll want to retell.
posted by el io at 3:55 PM on July 6, 2015 [2 favorites]


I was disappointed that there was no mention of China. I know it's not very big, but I often hear about people doing business there and it might be important in the future. On the plus side, it does mention Hong Kong, which I understand is quite near China and is probably very like it.
posted by Joe in Australia at 6:12 PM on July 6, 2015 [4 favorites]


It's hard for me to imagine that character Sun on Sense8 giving a shit about anyone's business card, culture or no culture.
posted by oceanjesse at 6:19 PM on July 6, 2015 [2 favorites]


wtf? Casual chitchat before meetings is ultra-common in Canada.

Are you referring to the ritual singing of Loverboy's Working for the Weekend? That is not casual.
posted by srboisvert at 9:06 PM on July 6, 2015 [7 favorites]


Careful politeness and lack of directness is my defense mechanism in unclear situations. I then moved to Germany.


Use the word quite on them (or anyone in the world really assuming you're English and privy to its secret meaning).
posted by srboisvert at 9:17 PM on July 6, 2015


I'd be pretty interested in learning about the prevalence of business cards, as well as other personal cards that may be used. I've seen the trading of cards in a non-business setting in media.

Mrs Jimbob got sent to Taiwan last year for a month, by Rotary (she's not a Rotarian, they just sent her and a bunch of other Inspiring Young Leaders). She returned with close to 1kg of business cards.

The main thing that concerns me about this list is... what if the people you're meeting are trying to be all culturally appropriate to you, as well? You turn up to a meeting in your newly bought Formal Attire, and they're all dressed casual to try and make you comfortable. So complex.
posted by Jimbob at 9:26 PM on July 6, 2015 [1 favorite]


Be prepared to sing a solo karaoke number after dinner.

I was born prepared. Do you think South Korean businesspeople would prefer "On My Own", "Memory", or the Japanese version of "Mr. Taxi" complete with dance?
posted by betweenthebars at 9:45 PM on July 6, 2015 [1 favorite]


I've been out of the country for the past week and haven't been following the news, so I didn't realize that Brazil had annexed all of South America. Just when I was getting up to speed with my Spanish, too.
posted by Johnny Wallflower at 9:56 PM on July 6, 2015 [1 favorite]


Use the word quite on them (or anyone in the world really assuming you're English and privy to its secret meaning).

I speak German at work exclusively, so I don't think that will work.
posted by frimble at 10:21 PM on July 6, 2015


I wonder how Canadians have indirect discussions about prohibited meeting interruptions.

"Is it colder in here?"
"Maybe somebody opened the door, eh?"
posted by obiwanwasabi at 10:25 PM on July 6, 2015 [2 favorites]


Do you think South Korean businesspeople would prefer "On My Own", "Memory", or the Japanese version of "Mr. Taxi" complete with dance?

Totally true fact: While those are fine selections for a purely social karaoke outing in Korea, in a business setting you'd probably be better off going with Riskay's "Smell Yo Dick" or the classic "Chinga Tu Madre" by Molotov.

Mostly it will depend on which chaebol you're dealing with, or the firm you're dealing with usually contracts with. Straight up hip-hop goes better with Hyundai, but LG's top brass have been pushing a more international flavor so Mexican or French stuff goes over better. If it's Samsung what you pick doesn't matter but FOR GOD'S SAKE don't actually sing -- just stand there staring angrily at your host's neck the whole time and then at the end offer an aggressive witticism and drop the mike.
posted by ROU_Xenophobe at 11:00 PM on July 6, 2015 [5 favorites]


I was surprised there was no section for China, or is it to big to be classified?

I wondered about this as well, since there are always a *lot* of Business Types around when I go to Shanghai. And there seems to be quite a bit of etiquette to be aware of, as well.

Another metric they could add is promptness... are you expecting people to turn up on time? Are they expecting *you* to be on time? How late can someone be before they are, like, late? In India, experience has shown the answers to be "no", "no" and "hours"...
posted by 43rdAnd9th at 5:45 AM on July 7, 2015 [1 favorite]


Switzerland's piece of advice for dining etiquette is to "cut potatoes with a fork, not a knife". It's actually recommended to cut most soft foods with a fork. I think it is just one of those arbitrary local dining etiquette rules, but I'd be interested in hearing the origin of it.
posted by Winnemac at 7:20 AM on July 7, 2015


Previously.

Interestingly enough shortly after that thread was posted, I changed jobs to work for a global technology company with a huge presence in Japan, and yet this company had business cards with rounded corners. So I tend to take articles like this with a grain of salt.

OTOH, prior to that I had gone for a year or so without ordering business cards, and one day I found myself in a meeting with bunch of middle management types from a Chinese company, and there was visible contempt on their faces when I could not produce any cards.
posted by George_Spiggott at 9:33 AM on July 7, 2015


In Austria, it's considered rude to cut dumplings with a knife, because it implies that the dumplings are so hard that they can't be cut with a fork. So it'd be an insult to the cook to cut a dumpling with a knife. I'm not familiar with any similar rules about potatoes, but maybe the rationale for the Swiss rule is similar. But it does seem like an oddly specific thing to include in this infographic. I'm sure most countries have their own specific food rules, so why single out this specific Swiss rule?
posted by klausness at 5:18 AM on July 11, 2015


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