36 Eggs
August 12, 2015 9:18 PM   Subscribe

HOW many eggs? A couple of librarians make recipes they've always wanted to eat from their favorite books. Recipes may contain bibliographies. [via mefi projects]

Some examples (from their projects page):

Ellen Pringle's 36-egg pound cake from Anne of Windy Poplars

Snarking Out, Daniel Pinkwater-style

Bruce Bogtrotter's giant chocolate cake from Matilda

The Harry Potter Month roundup

The Harry Potter Food and Drink Index and Concordance
posted by aniola (42 comments total) 33 users marked this as a favorite
 


I wonder if they'll ever get around to "How to Eat Fried Worms"....
posted by aniola at 9:49 PM on August 12, 2015


(Probably not. It's a blog about foods they've always wanted to eat.)
posted by aniola at 9:49 PM on August 12, 2015


The first link I clicked on noted that they used a recipe from Peg Bracken's I Hate to Cook Book. Yes!
posted by queensissy at 10:16 PM on August 12, 2015 [4 favorites]


From the page on British Snacks:
We hear that PG Tips is the #1 tea in Britain. Since tea is terribly important in HP, we must get the best.
Not only could "#1" and "best" easily refer to different measurements, I'm pretty sure PG Tips is neither. I did have a former colleague who would swear by the stuff, though.
posted by cardioid at 10:34 PM on August 12, 2015 [8 favorites]


It's relatively easy to get (ethnic food aisle in after Meyer) and pretty good so I would give it a go.
posted by Artw at 11:14 PM on August 12, 2015


(The important thing is that the water be hot. No, do not microwave it with the teabag in.)
posted by Artw at 11:15 PM on August 12, 2015


my late-night dyslexia frequently causes me to misread the word Librarian as Libertarian. I was wondering if Ron Paul or Ayn Rand were known for their cooking.
posted by Conrad-Casserole at 11:55 PM on August 12, 2015 [1 favorite]


(The important thing is that the water be hot. No, do not microwave it with the teabag in.)

And not just hot. The water has to be boiling when it hits the leaves. And let it brew for two minutes or so (depending on how strong you like it) before removing the teabag and adding a splash of milk (if making in a mug) or pouring into a cup that already contains milk (if making in teapot, which is preferable). Sugar depending on preference.
posted by him at 12:55 AM on August 13, 2015


I'm pretty sure PG Tips is neither. I did have a former colleague who would swear by the stuff, though.

At. Swear at it, surely.
posted by Joe in Australia at 2:02 AM on August 13, 2015 [4 favorites]


Fun! I like the look of Caitlin and Vix's Spaghetti with Green Stuff, and since we were just gifted a sack of homegrown tomatoes, and "Difficulty rating: 2 / Deliciousness rating: 8" is right up my alley, we might have to try this one tonight.
posted by taz at 2:05 AM on August 13, 2015 [1 favorite]


About the pound cake: there is a difference between beating by hand and beating with hands. Does L.M.Montgomery specify the latter? (Because I think Not.)
posted by CCBC at 2:35 AM on August 13, 2015


You would think so, but apparently some food historian told them that that's what those words meant at the time. Beaten. By. Hands.
posted by Joe in Australia at 2:55 AM on August 13, 2015


Let me know when they get to Redwall
posted by timdiggerm at 3:50 AM on August 13, 2015 [4 favorites]


You have to beat the cake mixture for an HOUR?? What the hell kind of cake mixture do you have to mix for AN HOUR? Was it just because there was so much volume of mixture?
posted by EndsOfInvention at 4:13 AM on August 13, 2015


I've always been fascinated by Meg Murray's liverwurst and cream cheese sandwich, in A Wrinkle in Time. I read it only once, and ages ago, but that (and the strange melancholy of the story in my memory) really tugs at me to this day. Now that one of our local stores finally carries Boar's Head deli meat, I may just be brave enough to give it a try one of these days. After a quick search, this person had the same inclination and acted on it.
posted by gilrain at 5:15 AM on August 13, 2015 [3 favorites]


It appears that it was actually Charles Wallace who made that sandwich in the story. I never did like Charles Wallace, though... too precious, too perfect. Meg was my hero, so I'm not surprised I transposed that moment to her in my memory,
posted by gilrain at 5:18 AM on August 13, 2015 [1 favorite]


I am impressed with their dedication to cake-thenticity. Mmm, pound cake.

About that British snack page though - are Mars bars not regularly available in San Diego?
posted by operalass at 5:23 AM on August 13, 2015




When visiting relatives in Ireland, we found that the secret of good tea and tolerable instant coffee is the electric kettle which makes the water hot enough. We had not seen them in the US previously, as this was several years ago, but have since given them as gifts to friends and relatives and they are always appreciated, and we use ours every day like the Irish cousins.
posted by mermayd at 5:53 AM on August 13, 2015


We hear that PG Tips is the #1 tea in Britain. Since tea is terribly important in HP, we must get the best.

Not only could "#1" and "best" easily refer to different measurements, I'm pretty sure PG Tips is neither. I did have a former colleague who would swear by the stuff, though.


It's time to play Which Tea Is Best!

We'll begin by our usual caveat, we're focusing on CTC teas only, even though we know that your SFTGFOP (Super Fine Tippy Golden Flowery Orange Pekoe, but actually Super Far Too Good For Ordinary People) Mangalam Estate Assam is far superior to any mere peasant tea.

I'm putting in a vote for Yorkshire Gold, or really any of the Taylor's of Harrogate breakfast teas
posted by leotrotsky at 5:54 AM on August 13, 2015 [1 favorite]


We would like to try separating the whites, whipping them, and then folding them in last next time to see if we could get more lift.

The solution is Rollings Reliable Baking Powder, obviously!
posted by Naanwhal at 6:07 AM on August 13, 2015 [3 favorites]


I haven't tried liverwurst and cream cheese, but Meg Murray was the reason I started cutting up little pickles for my tuna salad sandwiches. I've been thinking about her a lot lately, so thanks for that added memory.

(Also, "recipes may contain bibliographies" is the best warning ever.)
posted by blurker at 6:32 AM on August 13, 2015 [1 favorite]


I've always been fascinated by Meg Murray's liverwurst and cream cheese sandwich, in A Wrinkle in Time. I read it only once, and ages ago, but that (and the strange melancholy of the story in my memory) really tugs at me to this day. Now that one of our local stores finally carries Boar's Head deli meat, I may just be brave enough to give it a try one of these days. After a quick search, this person had the same inclination and acted on it.

I discovered from that person's blog that Oscar Meyer has stopped making liver sausage - that's awful! My grandfather always used to have liver sausage at their house, and indeed I myself ate many a vaguely middle-European liverwurst sandwich as a child. It's one of those things that everyone thinks must be gross and stinky because it has a mumble-mumble-German-mumble name but it is actually very tasty. I mean, I no longer eat meat, but if you're going to eat meat it's certainly a nice sandwich ingredient.

(Weirdly, a local co-op has this walnut pate that has an extremely similar flavor profile - it's not as fatty, much softer and lacks some of the meaty depth, but it must use similar spices because it was a total flashback when I bought some.)
posted by Frowner at 6:32 AM on August 13, 2015 [2 favorites]


We hear that PG Tips is the #1 tea in Britain. Since tea is terribly important in HP, we must get the best.

Not only could "#1" and "best" easily refer to different measurements, I'm pretty sure PG Tips is neither. I did have a former colleague who would swear by the stuff, though.


um... yeah - my SO is an underfunded, tea-addict British grad student, and he wouldn't touch PG Tips. Tetley's for everyday. But the best tea in Britain is tea from a quality tea merchant; I once had a Darjeeling which was like tea-champagne.
posted by jb at 6:43 AM on August 13, 2015


"I can eat 50 eggs."
posted by kirkaracha at 6:49 AM on August 13, 2015


um... yeah - my SO is an underfunded, tea-addict British grad student, and he wouldn't touch PG Tips. Tetley's for everyday. But the best tea in Britain is tea from a quality tea merchant; I once had a Darjeeling which was like tea-champagne.

Perhaps this is where I should share my tea discovery (as long as you like iced tea, at least) - not a kind of tea but a method. Even low-grade tea is improved by cold brewing, by which I mean steeping it in cool water in the fridge overnight. I've been making very ordinary medium-grade grocery store tea (from tea bags, no less, because I am lazy!) and have gotten much, much better results from cold steeping than from the standard method. The absolutely average green tea I've been buying, in particular, is definitely on the champagne-tea continuum when cold steeped, and I assume that even very so-so stuff of the Lipton's/PG Tips variety would be tremendously improved.
posted by Frowner at 6:50 AM on August 13, 2015 [3 favorites]


but don't try to drink regular American Tetley's - they sell a weaker tea in the States. The tea you want is "British Blend".
posted by jb at 7:36 AM on August 13, 2015 [2 favorites]


I have always, always wanted Ellen Pringle's pound cake recipe, and I am so very glad these folks figured it out.
posted by brina at 7:49 AM on August 13, 2015 [3 favorites]


The absolutely average green tea I've been buying, in particular, is definitely on the champagne-tea continuum when cold steeped, and I assume that even very so-so stuff of the Lipton's/PG Tips variety would be tremendously improved.

NO!!!! WAIT !!!!!!!!!!!!

Black Tea plays VERY DIFFERENTLY than green when you cold brew it. With Green tea you've got a more delicate flavor, and you are trying to avoid both excessive astringency and accidentally cooking the leaves (and thereby extracting unpleasant vegetal flavors) by overhot water. Cold brewing helps with both.

HOWEVER, Brewing CTC black tea is a whole different kettle of fish; you're wanting some those tannins to come out to give you the malty chewy mouth feel that most folks are looking for. Boiling water is magic for this. Not enough HOT water, and you've got insipid tea. If you cold brew, you also likely won't get near the rich color you're used to and the flavor profile will be completely different. Not BAD, mind you, but different. And certainly won't be bold enough to support milk in your cuppa.

Drink safe, everyone.
posted by leotrotsky at 9:02 AM on August 13, 2015 [1 favorite]


chewy mouth feel that most folks are looking for

If most people are looking for a chewy feel in their tea....well, I just don't know what the world is coming to, is all.

And does one drink iced tea with milk? Is that some kind of sick British perversion of American values?

Tsk, I just don't know anymore. First Oscar Meyer discontinues the liverwurst, now this.
posted by Frowner at 9:11 AM on August 13, 2015 [3 favorites]


If most people are looking for a chewy feel in their tea....well, I just don't know what the world is coming to, is all.

You've clearly never had Builder's Tea.
posted by leotrotsky at 10:50 AM on August 13, 2015


Ah, but Wikipedia itself says that the dreaded PG Tips is one of the best for Builder's Tea! Therefore, we must be suspicious about this whole business of chewy tea, since it is produced by a brand deemed inferior. I wouldn't mind some of those rich tea biscuits, though.
posted by Frowner at 10:54 AM on August 13, 2015


If most people are looking for a chewy feel in their tea....well, I just don't know what the world is coming to, is all.

I like my black tea so tanniny that it should be a rosy colour even after adding lots of milk. Before you put the milk in, it should be strong enough that you can't see the bottom of the cup.

Now, this isn't how I would drink good tea. That I drink in different ways, depending on the type (black, green, oolong, white, even puer).

But big standard black tea? Strong & with lots of milk, sometimes sugar. I recommend Tetley's, unless you are a "pansy southerner".
posted by jb at 11:06 AM on August 13, 2015 [2 favorites]


Avoid American teabags at all costs as they are basically just floor sweepings designed to give color to warm water.
posted by Artw at 11:09 AM on August 13, 2015


Sorry - meant "bog standard tea", whose colour should remind you of a bog.
posted by jb at 11:13 AM on August 13, 2015


Opaque tea? I'm sure that it is for this reason alone that my long long-ago English ancestors left for America.

When I drink Lipton (which is certainly bog standard) it has a creepy gelatinous quality and a distinct swampy taste - perhaps this is the chewy mouthfeel, but it seems to me like the tea that Cthulhu would drink upon rising from R'lyeh.
posted by Frowner at 11:15 AM on August 13, 2015


I get the pack of 6 50-count boxes of Twinings from Amazon for US$31.74 ($0.11/count). I get English Breakfast; they also have Irish Breakfast, Earl Grey, Darjeeling, and Green.
posted by kirkaracha at 3:09 PM on August 13, 2015



And does one drink iced tea with milk?

Yup.
posted by theappleonatree at 11:45 PM on August 13, 2015


Love this so much! Can I put in a request for the cheese cooked over a fire that Grandpa makes in Heidi? Ooh-and maple sugar candy from Little House!
posted by purenitrous at 9:20 AM on August 15, 2015 [1 favorite]


My parents made green eggs and ham once when I was a kid.
posted by aniola at 12:14 PM on August 15, 2015


Purenitrous, we have it on the list already! We just need to find someone who will let us milk their goat. :-)
posted by exceptinsects at 10:24 PM on August 16, 2015


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