#Harperman
August 31, 2015 12:51 PM   Subscribe

Tony Turner worked at Environment Canada. After releasing his protest song Harperman in June, he was recently put on leave for impartiality.

In 1991, the Supreme Court ruled that Canadian public servants have the same Charter rights as private citizens during election periods. In particular,
an employee may engage in any political activity so long as it does not impair, or is not perceived as impairing, the employee's ability to perform his or her duties in a politically impartial manner.
Although Turner was within a month of retirement, his union is fighting the suspension, claiming that his work -- tracking migratory birds -- was not being done impartially, and that partiality is allowed as long as it is not related to one's job.

Globe and Mail:
None of our materials say he’s a public servant. He’s performing as an artist. Besides freedom of speech, there’s an issue of artistic expression here,” Mr. Hall said.
National Post:
“The government risks giving this much more visibility than it warrants by launching an investigation. People will be on YouTube to look at this because they made it an issue.”
CBC:
"In my view, regardless of what the Supreme Court might say, public servants should not become political actors, especially in the middle of campaigns," he said. "They are not political actors. We have political actors; they are politicians."
posted by jeather (56 comments total) 17 users marked this as a favorite
 
Fuck Harper.
posted by The Card Cheat at 12:53 PM on August 31, 2015 [23 favorites]


I read this article in the Grauniad this morning and I just wanted to cry.
posted by Kitteh at 12:55 PM on August 31, 2015 [5 favorites]


I can't believe that the Harper crew were stupid enough to suspend this guy, thus giving him a huge amount of decidedly anti-Harper publicity.

I also can't believe the tortured arguments in news articles from law professors, etc. claiming public servants aren't allowed to speak freely on political issues as individuals. Why is anyone giving these old fuddy-duddies a platform to spew this stupidity?
posted by ssg at 1:06 PM on August 31, 2015 [1 favorite]


"We have political actors; they are politicians" that's a frankly terrifying statement.
posted by Wretch729 at 1:09 PM on August 31, 2015 [17 favorites]


This is something that people really ought to consider when we call for scientists to be better communicators and advocates about their work. For many of us, there are clear career trade-offs involved such that speaking honestly about e.g. environmental issues can actually cause harm to our careers; it's tempting to think that this is only an issue in with Harper being a dick, but every Forest Service / USGS / BLM employee I know has told me that they go out of their way to avoid saying things on the record that could be interpreted as political statements because there are so many stories of people being sidelined (passed over for promotions, ignored in meetings, left out of decision-making processes) for not being "impartial" about their science, where "impartial" means "having any opinions at all beyond p-values".

If we want scientists to communicate more effectively about their work, we may need to acknowledge that they are normal human beings with values and beliefs instead of acting like they are Fact Robots whose only purpose is to provide rhetorical ammunition to policymakers.
posted by dialetheia at 1:11 PM on August 31, 2015 [13 favorites]


Part of me wonders if the person who pushed the suspension is anti-Harper and wanted this to blow up badly for him.
posted by jeather at 1:15 PM on August 31, 2015 [1 favorite]


Maybe he can have a second career touring in a band called "The Chilling Effect"
posted by ethansr at 1:22 PM on August 31, 2015 [1 favorite]


> I can't believe that the Harper crew were stupid enough to suspend this guy, thus giving him a huge amount of decidedly anti-Harper publicity.

So far (fingers crossed, it's still early days), the Conpaign has not been going especially well.
posted by The Card Cheat at 1:22 PM on August 31, 2015 [1 favorite]


I overheard my wife watching the "Harperman" video yesterday and without context I thought it was awful and corny. Now I see why it got play--they put him on leave 1 month from his retirement, over that? Was he singing it at the office or something? Were they worried he would only check on the red and orange birds and ignore the blue ones? Fucking let it slide, guys, Jesus.

allowing public officials to engage in campaigning

Apparently this video was from June, well before an election campaign was underway. Unlike in the US, we have a number of parties so being critical of Harper doesn't really imply who he does support--it's not strictly "partisan" in the sense of being in support of any given political party. Not sure if that makes a difference to you or not on this point.

I still think the song sucks though.
posted by Hoopo at 1:25 PM on August 31, 2015 [4 favorites]


Stephen Harper, meet Barbara Streisand.
posted by Nerd of the North at 1:46 PM on August 31, 2015 [5 favorites]


I still think the song sucks though.

I mean, I totally agree with the sentiment behind it, but yeah, most definitely not the best political art ever.
posted by mandolin conspiracy at 1:50 PM on August 31, 2015 [1 favorite]


It's also worth pointing out the situation of Emilie Taman [warning: partisan website!], who was unable to receive a leave of absence from her job as a federal prosecutor, mainly going after regulatory compliance issues, in order to run for MP. The PSC, which is a special commission that rules on these things, said that she wasn't allowed to run. She went on unauthorized leave to do so anyways, because the court case would take too long, and was fired for it.

So it's not just that they can't criticize the government while working - they also can't go on leave in order to run for the fucking government.
posted by Lemurrhea at 1:51 PM on August 31, 2015 [2 favorites]


they also can't go on leave in order to run for the fucking government.

Some of them can. From The Card Cheat's links:
The email appears to have been written by Kris Sims, who is on leave from her role as director of communications for Veterans Affairs Minister Erin O’Toole in order to work for the party during the campaign.
posted by jeather at 1:58 PM on August 31, 2015 [1 favorite]


[Couple comments deleted. Please don't immediately turn a thread about somewhere not-USA into a USA thread. Thanks. ]
posted by restless_nomad (staff) at 2:00 PM on August 31, 2015 [4 favorites]


The Canadian Supreme Court case seems pretty clear that this is protected political speech for a government employee. And the Canadian Charter's guarantees of free political speech & action are quite broad.

Lemurrhea: "It's also worth pointing out the situation of Emilie Taman [warning: partisan website!], who was unable to receive a leave of absence from her job as a federal prosecutor, mainly going after regulatory compliance issues, in order to run for MP. "

This is SLIGHTLY different because an MP is a political position (and a federal prosecutor with discretion about who to prosecute may also be a "policy" position, I don't know enough about how your system works). Common-law systems (like Canada and the US) typically distinguish between employees in bureaucratic roles -- who are responsible for doing day-to-day jobs in ways dictated from on high and are hired and promoted on merit (or seniority) -- and policy employees, who are the senior managers appointed by the government to create and enact the policies of the (partisan) government. Typically bureaucratic employees are entitled to broad free speech rights while keeping their government jobs, because Common Law countries place a large premium on free political speech and voluntary association, and it's a significant, significant abridgement of rights to say that ALL government employees are prohibited from partisan involvement -- it would require a significant, significant justification. Policy employees, however, typically don't have the same protections -- if Peter MacKay woke up tomorrow and announced he was NDP, you wouldn't expect Harper to keep him in his cabinet job. Policy employees often include senior non-elected management roles, and some systems distinguish "part-policy" roles (folks right under that top tier of non-elected management) who have a role in assisting the creation of policy but mostly do work as directed by senior managers.

Elected roles are generally automatically "policy" positions and it's not unusual to restrict government employees from running for elected office that is or would be directly related to their government employment (while continuing in that employment -- you can obvs quit and run).

Anyway, this guy seems pretty clearly to be straight-up bureaucracy, and firing bureaucrats for political activity is virtually always stupid, even if you're allowed to. Double extra stupid if they're in a union.
posted by Eyebrows McGee at 2:05 PM on August 31, 2015 [3 favorites]


(Sorry to remind everyone of that "Shut Up and Dance With Me" song ruling the airwaves, but this is the first thing that came to mind)

Oh don’t you dare speak out
The party line agree
I said I have my doubts
He said, “shut up and vote PC”
The Cons have a choke hold on me
They said, you
Shut up and vote PC

We were victims of the chill
They’d rather let oil than opinions spill
Helpless to the hair and the bitter pill
Oh I was bound to get suspended
Bound to get suspended

He took my job
I know just how it happened
I’m out the door and he said

Oh don’t you dare look back
No matter what you see
I said your line’s a crack
He said, “shut up and vote PC”
Election vetted fantasy
They said, you
Shut up and vote PC

An unbacked claim and some beat up lies
Don’t publish results that might criticize
The public might then begin to surmise
That you might lie to get elected
Lie to get elected

They threw me out
I know just how it happened
They saw the polls and they said

Oh don’t you dare think thoughts
It might mean that you’re free
I said we’re not robots
He said, "shut up and vote PC"
Distressed by ambiguity
He said you
Shut up and vote PC

Shut up and vote PC
posted by ilana at 2:05 PM on August 31, 2015 [4 favorites]


Part of me wonders if the person who pushed the suspension is anti-Harper and wanted this to blow up badly for him.

Or if someone pro-Harper pushed someone anti-Harper to push the suspension, then reveals that it was pushed by the anti-Harper person and it's a brilliant gambit by Harper's supporters to create the impression of a vast left-wing conspiracy within the federal public service.

Oh dear. We're really through the looking glass here.
posted by mandolin conspiracy at 2:06 PM on August 31, 2015


Eyebrows, it's true - and someone in Taman's position I'd probably not consider a policy-based role. Your normal federal Crown doesn't have that kind of authority - I've definitely had my local guy have to talk with his superiors before he could accept certain deals. Discretion in exercising set policy, essentially. Taman is slightly different than a normal federal Crown, being in the regulatory side, but I'd expect it's the case.

That being said, the ability to take an unpaid leave of absence is meant to be the safety valve for that. You don't have to fully quit, but you can't be working + criticizing. We'll see how the court case shakes out, I suppose.

But yeah, Taman's situation is not nearly as bad as Turner's. His is atrocious, and there's very little I can even say about it. Just...it's wrong.
posted by Lemurrhea at 2:12 PM on August 31, 2015 [2 favorites]


needs the "streisandeffect" tag.
posted by schmod at 2:16 PM on August 31, 2015


The loathing for Harper's meddling and muzzling among government scientists knows no bounds. I'm told that a senior scientist, senior enough to receive a personal token of appreciation from Harper on their retirement, was alleged to have done something entirely unspeakable with it afterwards.
posted by scruss at 2:17 PM on August 31, 2015 [1 favorite]


Is it me or are the words "partiality" and "impartiality" switched in the FPP? Isn't he supposed to be impartial (unbiased) and was put on leave for allegedly being partial (biased)?
posted by mmoncur at 2:21 PM on August 31, 2015 [4 favorites]


So far (fingers crossed, it's still early days), the Conpaign has not been going especially well.

Don't trust the echo-chamber. This election is going to be a nail-biter.
posted by Nevin at 2:28 PM on August 31, 2015 [4 favorites]


I'm told that a senior scientist, senior enough to receive a personal token of appreciation from Harper on their retirement, was alleged to have done something..
Take Your Carriage Clock And Shove It
posted by Nerd of the North at 2:39 PM on August 31, 2015 [2 favorites]


Yeah, I meant to say "breaking regulations about impartiality", which I abridged unclearly.
posted by jeather at 2:44 PM on August 31, 2015


In my view, regardless of what the Supreme Court might say...

...You can't be half-pregnant,"

My Lord, this journalist managed to frame a turd perfectly. Savoie seems to have pretty legit credentials in public admin, too, I wonder what happened here context-wise? Here he is last year talking about de-politicizing the public service from the top down, and making sense. But it doesn't seem to apply to a public servant like Turner making a YouTube video in his free time at all. I wonder if they approached him asking questions in very broad terms?
posted by Hoopo at 2:46 PM on August 31, 2015


Until he was sent home, he was assigned to co-ordinate a project to map priority areas for migratory birds. Daviau said the legal test for conflict of interest is whether a reasonable person could possibly think the impartiality of Turner’s work tracking migratory birds could be influenced by writing a folk song.

I confess that I'm not entirely familiar with Canadian law and politics, but this doesn't seem to pass a reasonable person test. His job is to track migratory birds. How would one even do that in a politically biased fashion? Can the birds vote? Is bird migration a hot button issue in contemporary Canadian politics? Are the birds migrating to Vancouver to manipulate real estate prices?
posted by langtonsant at 3:01 PM on August 31, 2015 [3 favorites]


Hoopo, it looks like Savoie has some pretty extreme beliefs about what public servants should be able to do (basically never anything partisan) that happens to sound sort of reasonable when he is talking about moving away from partisan appointments of senior public servants, but sound pretty crazy when he is talking about allowing public servants free speech on political issues.

Those two sides of his opinions seem internally consistent to me (even though I can't agree with him at all). One does wonder, if you are a Canada Research Chair for public policy and administration and you find yourself giving a quote starting with "In my view, regardless of what the Supreme Court might say", you might not want to pause and consider if you are about to say something ridiculous.
posted by ssg at 3:14 PM on August 31, 2015 [1 favorite]


Yeah the Savoie comment stood out to me, too, Hoopo.
He seems to think that politics is for politicians ... What about citizens? What about an active citizenry? Surely the loss of citizen participation in debate is far worse for the country and democracy than the risk of a civil servant having an opinion.

I don't think Turner has crossed the line here, he wasn't at work, and he didn't represent himself as a government employee in the video.

The biggest joke to me is that this was his church social justice group singing! Where is the Office of Religious Freedom now?
posted by chapps at 3:16 PM on August 31, 2015 [2 favorites]


[also, please add the fuckharper tag if you are amenable. I know its rude, but I use it to quickly find all the Canadian election content on the blue!!]
posted by chapps at 3:17 PM on August 31, 2015 [3 favorites]


On the song, I think it is pretty good as a folk protest song. Its very singable an the chorus is catchy. If you want some more professional offerings in opposition to Harper , there is some fun stuff around.

My fave for this election is Geoff Berner's half hearted plea to vote NDP ... along with the classic wandering vocals and accordion we come to expect from GB.

Raffi wants canada back.

And this one, about cuts to culture in 2008, and featuring Michel Rivard is old... but deserves to be revived! (turn on the CC to get all the jokes via english subtitles).
posted by chapps at 3:29 PM on August 31, 2015 [1 favorite]


Some minor context on Savoie since there aren't many NB mefites around and he's from there:

New Brunswick has had a couple of scandals recently, the thrust of which are government public servants (deputy ministers, who are supposed to be the highest non-partisan leader a ministry) altered official government records to keep a guest list secret. They are also the only province (I think) that has a system which allows MLAs to choose which summer student jobs get funded, and specifically lets government MLAs have more time to award [as grouse put it to me, it's the Jacksonian spoils system alive and well!] There have been allegations that the current Liberal premier influenced the choice of which hospitals would start allowing abortion in order to keep him in political cover - I tend to believe them but haven't substantiated them.

Traditionally, Canada/Provincial public services were staunchly non-partisan and proud of it. You'd have deputy ministers staying across multiple different parties in power. They were the 'how' to the government's 'what', essentially. That's changed - not just with Harper, mind, but with what I'll call the increased politicizing of the public sphere in general - that confluence of mass-media penetration/responsiveness, direct-targeting abilities by parties, and ...something that has allowed campaigning to be much more pervasive than it used to be. 20 years or so.
posted by Lemurrhea at 3:50 PM on August 31, 2015 [4 favorites]


chapps: Thanks for the Geoff Berner link. I was rather bemused when he released Maginot Line. He'd kinda fallen off my radar.
posted by mandolin conspiracy at 3:58 PM on August 31, 2015 [1 favorite]


More from Mr Savoie on the creeping (and, most recently, galloping) politicization of the civil service in Canada. You can listen on CBC player if you want the detail.
posted by aeshnid at 4:26 PM on August 31, 2015 [1 favorite]


This is SLIGHTLY different because an MP is a political position (and a federal prosecutor with discretion about who to prosecute may also be a "policy" position, I don't know enough about how your system works). Common-law systems (like Canada and the US) typically distinguish between employees in bureaucratic roles -- who are responsible for doing day-to-day jobs in ways dictated from on high and are hired and promoted on merit (or seniority) -- and policy employees, who are the senior managers appointed by the government to create and enact the policies of the (partisan) government.

Broadly speaking, in Canada the only partisan political appointees are the Ministers of whatever (and they're all elected; basically the same function as Secretaries in your Cabinet but they're Members of Parliament). Below them it's basically just career bureaucrats who execute policy directed from on high. Some heads of agencies report directly to Parliament--e.g. the Auditor-General--though they are themselves politically impartial; they just take orders directly from the Commons rather than having an insulating Ministerial layer between them and the House. It's unusual for an incoming government to sack the heads of whatever agencies, so as said above they'll run the same agency across multiple governments of various ideologies.

A Crown prosecutor isn't a policy-setting position. The Minister of Justice spearheads policy which is set in the House of Commons and the Cabinet Office. (More realistically these days the MJ parrots policy written by right-wing gooberheads at the Fraser Institute and programmed directly into Harper's OS by the techies in the PMO).

Basically in Canada almost all of our bureaucracy is made of career positions, we don't have the orgy of appointments at every new federal government that you have. By analogy, Canadian governmental agencies are basically beehives; you can replace the Queen and the workers keep on working.
posted by feckless fecal fear mongering at 5:06 PM on August 31, 2015 [2 favorites]


It is really important to encourage everyone you know to get out and vote.
posted by five fresh fish at 5:15 PM on August 31, 2015 [8 favorites]


I yearn for a government that is consultative. One that encourages and funds non-partisan expertise. One that bases its goals on science and statistics. One that sets our objectives in broad terms, and trusts the rank and file to achieve those objectives. One that openly documents these efforts, so that it can be held accountable. A government of the people, for the people.
posted by five fresh fish at 5:19 PM on August 31, 2015 [1 favorite]


langtonsant: "His job is to track migratory birds. How would one even do that in a politically biased fashion? Can the birds vote? Is bird migration a hot button issue in contemporary Canadian politics?"

The argument I would make (were I an idiot and the lawyer for the idiots) is that bird migration is tied to global warming and conservation and that by involving himself in policy debates on global warming and conservation (he makes a reference to Environment Canada in the song), it becomes difficult to rely upon the data he is presenting as a scientist because of his strong advocacy position that might encourage him to fudge the data to make global warming seem worse than it is or to make, say, the Alberta Tar Sands seem more environmentally catastrophic than advertised.

I DO NOT SUPPORT THIS EVIL ARGUMENT (nobody try to argue with me like I do!), but this is the argument they're probably going to make, since conservatives would like science not to draw conclusions, or ideally not to present problematic data in the first place.

feckless fecal fear mongering: "we don't have the orgy of appointments at every new federal government that you have."

We don't actually have that many, but cabinet secretaries aren't elected MPs in the US.

posted by Eyebrows McGee at 5:35 PM on August 31, 2015


Per Wikipedia an incoming President must make about 6-7K appointments. That doesn't happen here.

And yes I know that cabinet secretaries aren't elected in the USA, which is why I said "basically the same function as Secretaries in your Cabinet but they're Members of Parliament."
posted by feckless fecal fear mongering at 5:43 PM on August 31, 2015


They are also the only province (I think) that has a system which allows MLAs to choose which summer student jobs get funded

This is, sadly, also the case on the federal level. Student Summer Job subsidies pass over the MPs' desks and they have the power to reject any or all that they don't like (and can request more applications from Service Canada if they don't like the ones they are sent). This is, of course, potentially quite sleazy, but not well known.
posted by ssg at 6:10 PM on August 31, 2015 [1 favorite]


Good thing Miss Universe, Ashley Burnham, isn't a Canadian public servant... She is encouraging Aboriginal voters in Canada to vote out Harper. (She is from the Enoch Cree Nation, you may recognize her from the drama Blackstone).
posted by chapps at 6:32 PM on August 31, 2015 [2 favorites]


I yearn for a government that is consultative.

The last time we had this sort of government was with Brian Mulroney, just sayin'.
posted by Nevin at 8:20 PM on August 31, 2015


Not sure if this is the new election thread, but Gerald Caplan thinks that the NDP and the Liberals are seriously considering working together to form a government (if not a coalition).
posted by Nevin at 9:48 PM on August 31, 2015 [2 favorites]


(It's worth reading the comments)
posted by Nevin at 10:02 PM on August 31, 2015


Indeed, the difference in policy between the NDP under Mulcair and the Liberals is pretty hard to discern. There are some slight tax policy differences, though these are more idealogical flourishes than significant differences. I think the NDP trade policy might differ from the Liberal policy, but there hasn't been much said about that in the campaign. Day care policy, perhaps.

They are both falling over each other to promise more and more to the middle class, of course.
posted by ssg at 10:30 PM on August 31, 2015


Mulcair (I believe) said that the NDP will not oppose TPP.

But then again the Liberals under Chretien campaigned on repealing NAFTA, which (thankfully) they never attempted.
posted by Nevin at 10:37 PM on August 31, 2015


>I yearn for a government that is consultative.

The last time we had this sort of government was with Brian Mulroney, just sayin'.


Sayin' what, exactly? That you prefer a government that does not consult? That does not seek information?
posted by five fresh fish at 10:54 PM on August 31, 2015


I'd prefer a government somewhere to the left of Harper. Which I think Mulroney might actually be by this point, which is a chilling thought.
posted by feckless fecal fear mongering at 10:58 PM on August 31, 2015 [2 favorites]


Re libs vs NDP, the big issues I am hearing raised, and that matter to me are: c-51, childcare policy, and some comments about tax policy (raising corporate vs raising high income earner taxes). The C51 issue is what made me really step back from any strategic lib vote support option (as an NDP anyone but harper type)

The other big issue I am concerned about is violence against women, especially Aboriginal women, which seems to have rallied into a real issue this election. (Enfin!) Not sure what Trudeau will raise on that in the face of the NDP announcement today. So far the libs have had the women's debate issue on that one, but I liked the NDP policy announcement today quite a bit (not surprising to me, as I have always thought they had far and away the best policy on women issues.)
posted by chapps at 11:02 PM on August 31, 2015


Eyebrows McGee: "The argument I would make (were I an idiot and the lawyer for the idiots) is that bird migration is tied to global warming and conservation and that by involving himself in policy debates on global warming and conservation (he makes a reference to Environment Canada in the song), it becomes difficult to rely upon the data he is presenting as a scientist because of his strong advocacy position that might encourage him to fudge the data to make global warming seem worse than it is or to make, say, the Alberta Tar Sands seem more environmentally catastrophic than advertised.

I DO NOT SUPPORT THIS EVIL ARGUMENT
"

Yes... that is magnificently evil. There's just enough public discussion of the replication problems in science and difficulties associated with undisclosed researcher degrees of freedom -- and just enough ignorance about what the real issues with scientific processes are -- that you might just be able to make something like that fly. Do you by any chance have an EVIL EYEBROWS counterpart somewhere whose newsletter I could subscribe to? Or whose email account needs to be immediately blacklisted by my IT department?
posted by langtonsant at 11:05 PM on August 31, 2015 [3 favorites]


I'd prefer a government somewhere to the left of Harper. Which I think Mulroney might actually be by this point, which is a chilling thought.

Mulroney was a very strong proponent for sanctions against South Africa over Apartheid and also a vocal critic of the South African government of the time. For the life of me I can't see Harper, were he PM then, taking the same stand.
posted by Phlegmco(tm) at 11:22 PM on August 31, 2015 [2 favorites]


langtonsant: "Do you by any chance have an EVIL EYEBROWS counterpart somewhere whose newsletter I could subscribe to?"

Unfortunately they're just called "lawyers" and they are Legion.
posted by Eyebrows McGee at 7:57 AM on September 1, 2015




For the life of me I can't see Harper, were he PM then, taking the same stand.

Harper takes a stand against countries that may or may not have a legitimate claim on resources we traditionally felt were Canada's. That's not necessarily a bad thing, but yeah, I miss Principles.
posted by Hoopo at 9:55 AM on September 1, 2015 [1 favorite]


Stats Canada's figures confirm today that Canada is in a recession. The PM is quick to point out that many sectors of the economy that are not oil and gas are doing well. There may be a couple of eggs that were not in the basket which is currently shattered and oozing yolk.

The Canadian dollar is hovering around 75 cents US. This is the lowest it has been in a decade.

The man in the blue suit has reassured us repeatedly that while he may have run eight deficits in a row and added $150 billion in debt, Canada's employment numbers are "head and shoulders" above the rest of the G7. Organizations that are not the Conservative Party of Canada rank Canada fifth out of the seven countries in employment stats.

Harper, who is trained as an economist, refuses to define what a recession is but admits we have entered a contraction, and says now is the time to "stay the course."

What a lovely day! What a lovely, lovely day!
posted by ricochet biscuit at 11:07 AM on September 1, 2015 [6 favorites]


Part of me is amazed he didn't just threaten StatsCan into faking the numbers.
posted by The Card Cheat at 11:39 AM on September 1, 2015


Most Albertans believe Stephen Harper is a better defender of Alberta's interests than Premier Rachel Notley, according to a new poll, amid increasing pessimism about the province's economy.

Fifty per cent of Albertans give the nod to the federal Conservative leader on that question, compared to 33 per cent who favour Notley, the leader of Alberta's New Democrats, according to a poll conducted by Mainstreet Research.


Mainstreet Research's landing page:
Since 1993, individuals and institutions have turned to the professionals at Main Street Research for wealth management expertise. Whether you and your family have private wealth or you are an institutional investor, we are committed to understanding your expectations and applying them to a carefully developed, long-term strategy. Our communicative style makes it possible for you to have goal oriented investment results and a personal, responsive client/advisor relationship.
You see, they surveyed both kinds of people: those with private wealth and institutional investors. And fully half of those (or "most", as the article has it) figure the man in the blue suit is a better steward of Alberta's dollars.
posted by ricochet biscuit at 1:34 PM on September 1, 2015 [2 favorites]


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