The not-so-secret history of comics drawn by women
January 10, 2016 12:20 PM   Subscribe

 
I would pay good money to see this jackass stuck in a room alone with Kelly Sue DeConnick.

And no, I'm not implying she would get violent. Necessarily.
posted by scaryblackdeath at 12:24 PM on January 10, 2016 [9 favorites]


Thanks for posting this. Bondoux's comments make me feel tired and sad, so personally I want to focus on the number of extraordinary cartoonists discussed in this article. Caitlin McGurk's recommendations alone are a wonderful starting syllabus for anyone.
posted by thetortoise at 12:29 PM on January 10, 2016


I truly appreciate the male nominees who dropped out. I shouldn't have to, but I do, until the day comes that men no longer have to see that another man holds a woman's idea in order to take it seriously.

“The Festival likes women, but cannot rewrite the history of comics,” he said.

I haaate it when dudes say they "like" or, worse, "love" women like this. It's always in the context of not taking them seriously when they aren't busy making themselves likable or lovable to men.
posted by Countess Elena at 12:29 PM on January 10, 2016 [21 favorites]


Here is a really good summary of the Angoulême situation.
posted by 1970s Antihero at 12:31 PM on January 10, 2016 [7 favorites]


To put an example of the disconnect in the voter/nomination pool in Angoulême: Riyoko Ikeda, author of a long list of manga since the 70s among them The Rose of Versailles, was awarded in 2008 the Légion d'Honneur. But apparently she's not relevant enough for Angoulême to be nominated, even if she was a guest there in 2011.
posted by sukeban at 12:34 PM on January 10, 2016 [7 favorites]


“The Festival likes women, but cannot rewrite the history of comics,” he said.

As the author points out, that's EXACTLY what we can and must do. History, of course, has long been written by straight white men who intentionally obscure the roles played by anyone who isn't like them. We have every opportunity to tell new stories, different stories, old stories in a new way, untold stories. This is one such opportunity. Maybe Bondoux should try to "like" women enough to actually try to understand the role they've played in the history of comics, and the historical context behind their exclusion.

Or rather: Franck Bondoux? More like, Franck Maldur! #frenchjoke
posted by ORthey at 12:48 PM on January 10, 2016 [19 favorites]


The link that 1970s Antihero posted is a real eye opener: (I am told one juror asked as late as the 2010s “Who is this Chris Ware you keep mentioning?”)
posted by Halloween Jack at 1:11 PM on January 10, 2016 [2 favorites]


Maybe Bondoux should try to "like" women enough to actually try to understand the role they've played in the history of comics, and the historical context behind their exclusion.

Women's contributions to certain areas seem to get downplayed. Comics is one and I am glad to see people taking a second look at the profession....
posted by Alexandra Kitty at 1:55 PM on January 10, 2016 [1 favorite]


CLAMP does not deserve any prizes, unless it is a prize for making fans angry.

Riyoko Ikeda would be an obvious choice, other than that, Moto Hagio or Fumi Yoshinaga.
posted by betweenthebars at 2:00 PM on January 10, 2016 [2 favorites]


Can anyone recommend a good monthly bd magazine that's like Island?

Casemate looks promising.
posted by sebastienbailard at 2:23 PM on January 10, 2016


Scratch that, none of the 16 bd-ists in this month's Casemate seem to be women, which is not exactly a shock, considering.

Any recommendations?
posted by sebastienbailard at 3:08 PM on January 10, 2016


Shaenon Garrity's take: https://bitchmedia.org/article/welcome-2016-when-you-cant-afford-ignore-women-comics

Slowly, it seems like the culture of comics is changing for the better. The pushback to the Angoulême announcement shows that comics industry establishments are now part of a new era in which it won’t be so easy to overlook and exclude women. Female creators dominated the major U.S. comics awards, with artists like Jill Thompson (Beasts of Burden), Fiona Staples (Saga), Mariko and Jillian Tamaki (This One Summer), Cece Bell (El Deafo), Emily Carroll (Through the Woods), and the all-women team behind Lumberjanes taking top awards and making major sales. At the Ignatz Awards, the biggest award for indie comics, women won every category. The New York Times bestseller list for comics throughout 2015 was dominated by Raina Telgemeier and other female YA graphic novelists. As of this writing, all six of Telgemeier’s graphic novels are on the NYT list. Comics centering on female characters “dominated” digital sales last year, lead by popular titles like Ms. Marvel and a Thor series that features a female god of thunder.
posted by Kilter at 5:20 PM on January 10, 2016 [3 favorites]


Well, it is hard to think of any women in comics, besides Alison Bechdel, Ellen Forney, Carol Lay, Dale Messick, Moto Hagio, Rumuko Takahashi, Riyoko Ikeda, Ursula Vernon, Jessica Abel, Marguerite Abouet, Jana Christy, Sarah Dyer, Jess Fink, Erica Moen, Leanne Franson, Patty Leidy, Laurie Sandell, Marjane Satrapi, Posy Simmonds, Willow Wilson, Elizabeth Watasin, Maitena Burundarena, Claire Bretecher, Julie Doucet, Sylvie Rancourt, Colleen Coover, Molly Kiely, Kate Worley, Jennifer Camper, Jen Soresen, Tove Jansson, Lise Myhre, Emily Flake, Jennifer Berman, Mikhaela Reid, Marian Henley, Cathy Guisewite, Lynn Johnston, Paige Braddock, Roberta Gregory, Joan Hilty, Kris Kovick, Diane DiMassa, Linda Medley, Jill Thompson, Shary Flenniken, Aline Kominsky, Lina Buffolente, Fanny Cory, Grace Drayton, Frances Dumm, Erika Fuchs, Marge Henderson, Dale Conner, Tarpe Mills, Rose O'Neill, Machiko Hasegawa, Molly Crabapple, Kate Beaton, Marie Severin, Roz Chast, Colleen Doran, Mary Fleener, Pia Guerra, Caitlin Kiernan, Elaine Lee, Leah Moore, Ann Nocenti, Wendy Pini, Gail Simone, Donna Barr, Sophie Crumb, Melinda Gebbie, Megan Kelso, Carla Speed McNeil, Marisa Marchetto, Dori Seda, Trina Robbins, Lynda Barry, Nicole Hollander, Yu Yabuchi, Arina Tanemura, Natsuki Takaya, Temari Matsumoto, Go Ikeyamada, Fumi Yoshinaga, Sandra Boynton, Nina Paley, Bianca Bagnarelli, Hwei Lim, Trudy Cooper, Jillian Tamaki, Hope Larson, Yumi Sakugawa, Lucy Knisley, Fiona Staples, Faith Erin Hicks, Raina Telgemeier, Helen Hokinson, Spike Trotman, Noelle Stevenson, Emily Carroll, Jennifer Hayden, Elizabeth Watasin, Shing Yin Khor, Stephanie Yue, Penelope Bagieu, Ariel Schrag, and sorry, it's dinner time and I'm tired of typing.
posted by zompist at 5:45 PM on January 10, 2016 [58 favorites]


The French comics scene has never been particularly friendly to women. There's Claire Bretécher and Florence Cestac and yeah, there was There was Ah! Nana, which is cool but is basically "like Metal Hurlant except by women except still for men" and then you're kind of out. Yeah, there are some younger women like Pénélope Bagieu and Julie Maroh, which is cool, but the scene is still -- and always has been -- dominated by a bunch of men. I think a lot of that was absolutely intentional. Yeah, there was a lot of talent there (a lot of great talent) but I don't think anyone would look at France and think "Yeah, there was absolutely a space for women in the comics scene."

These are generalizations! Absolutely! but France's scene has always felt a bit backward to me. I'm not surprised this happened. I'm not surprised Franck Bondoux doubled-down and doubled-down again. That list was mostly a bunch of people he and his friends wanted to hang out with. Angoulême still matters in comics, but not as much as it once did. And it matters even less so now. They've proven they aren't interested in moving comics forward, but keeping it as it is.

So I run the Ignatz Awards for Small Press Expo (which sure, is not Angoulême but we like to think we're important). And yes, all the winners were women this year. And I had to have that pointed out to me -- the person who spent MONTHS WORKING ON THIS. It didn't even feel like a thing to me because it was just "amazing creators being recognized for their amazing work." I love how normal the whole thing felt.

If you're ignoring women making comics -- or really, anyone who isn't a straight white man making comics -- it's because you've intentionally decided to do so. You're lazy and comics is going to pass you by pretty quickly. (In a lot of ways, it already has.)
posted by darksong at 7:02 PM on January 10, 2016 [17 favorites]


Well, it is hard to think of any women in comics, besides...

Damn
posted by clockzero at 7:52 PM on January 10, 2016


FFS, zompist, it's Erika Moen. With a K.

j/k, that's pretty freakin' awesome. From memory?
posted by Halloween Jack at 10:09 PM on January 10, 2016 [1 favorite]


(also, I'd throw in Sophie Campbell.)
posted by Halloween Jack at 10:10 PM on January 10, 2016


Yeah, I can't spell sometimes... apologies also to Rumiko Takahashi and Jen Sorensen... I blame it on my new glasses.

I'm weak on manga, so I checked Wikipedia for names there, and only included a sampling-- they list nearly 200 Japanese women in comics.

Also of interest, the nearly 200 créatrices who are members of BD Égalité.
posted by zompist at 11:05 PM on January 10, 2016 [1 favorite]


Some women in comics in the Netherlands:
Barbara Stok, Maaike Hartjes, Edith Kuyvenhoven, Judith Vanistendael, Farida Laan, Zeina Abirached, Alissa Torres, Julie Doucet en Rutu Modan.
posted by Too-Ticky at 2:27 AM on January 11, 2016 [1 favorite]


The French comics scene has never been particularly friendly to women. There's Claire Bretécher and Florence Cestac and yeah, there was There was Ah! Nana, which is cool but is basically "like Metal Hurlant except by women except still for men" and then you're kind of out. Yeah, there are some younger women like Pénélope Bagieu and Julie Maroh, which is cool, but the scene is still -- and always has been -- dominated by a bunch of men. I think a lot of that was absolutely intentional. Yeah, there was a lot of talent there (a lot of great talent) but I don't think anyone would look at France and think "Yeah, there was absolutely a space for women in the comics scene."

I think manga is even bigger there than in the states, with the same proportion of shoujo manga being read, meaning that local publishers and the establishment were ignoring girls and women who turned to manga to get their fix.
posted by sebastienbailard at 7:00 PM on January 12, 2016


Celebrating Women in Comics
posted by Artw at 9:17 AM on January 13, 2016 [3 favorites]


Angouleme organizers criticized for presenting fake awards

Bit of a shitshow all around.
posted by Artw at 7:31 AM on February 1, 2016 [1 favorite]


Best Series win for Ms. Marvel is an upside though.
posted by Artw at 7:38 AM on February 1, 2016


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