Weather Map Data Porn
May 9, 2016 4:16 PM   Subscribe

The National Weather Service's Enhanced Data Display is in its experimental but still fun-to-play-with stage. It's a product of the Charleston, WV, NWS station's Weather Ready Nation Pilot Project. There are demos and tutorials on NWS Charleston's Youtube page. Mobile version
posted by not_on_display (20 comments total) 20 users marked this as a favorite
 
Very cool that the NWS is doing this.

After toying about with it I think I still prefer Weather Underground's Wundermap.
posted by sp160n at 4:57 PM on May 9, 2016 [1 favorite]


That's very cool. Works great on the iPad, too, which can be a rarity for things like this. Good job, NWS!
posted by Thorzdad at 5:18 PM on May 9, 2016


Very nice. Not quite as intuitive as weatherspark but a very good start.
posted by Death and Gravity at 5:26 PM on May 9, 2016


And it is built on open source frameworks(qooxdoo, which I have never used, and open layers, which is a very powerful tool for advanced web maps) good for them. I was totally expecting yet another arc mapper.
posted by rockindata at 5:28 PM on May 9, 2016 [1 favorite]


Holy Java '97, Batman. That's a dense, cryptic UI.

I'm with sp160n. The kids at NWS need to spend a month or so playing with Wundermap and really up their game here.
posted by JoeZydeco at 6:09 PM on May 9, 2016


"Very nice. Not quite as intuitive as weatherspark but a very good start." Well, now that Weatherspark is dead, I guess I will mess around with the NWS displays...
posted by Patapsco Mike at 6:15 PM on May 9, 2016


This is amazing and so much more powerful than Wundermap.
posted by RonButNotStupid at 6:20 PM on May 9, 2016 [2 favorites]


Weatherspark doesn't look dead to me.
posted by Death and Gravity at 6:29 PM on May 9, 2016


Clicking around a bit more this really does expose a lot more data than Wundermap etc.

Takes a while to get a handle on the UI.
posted by sp160n at 7:17 PM on May 9, 2016


The Javascript they are using is qooxdoo for the GUI and OpenLayers for the map. Also uses Flot and D3. I am impressed the site seems to work on Mobile Safari. The names in the Credits suggests this was done by NWS employees, not a contract, which is encouraging.

NWS is a great part of government and they produce and distribute amazing data. I just wish they were a little more up to date with web tech trends. This site is way more advanced than existing NWS services though, so it's an improvement!

(Also I totally tempered my snark when I saw they credited me by name for wind rose code I wrote a couple years back. That was kind of them! Although I haven't found it in action; anyone found a wind rose on the site?)
posted by Nelson at 7:20 PM on May 9, 2016 [3 favorites]


Weatherspark doesn't look dead to me.

It used to be a flash app with a scrolling graph of weather model predictions with a drop down selector for the three major models with the ability to also have split screen with an animated radar map.

It was way better than the Wundermap. I miss it dearly.
posted by srboisvert at 7:23 PM on May 9, 2016 [1 favorite]


> Clicking around a bit more this really does expose a lot more data than Wundermap etc.

Takes a while to get a handle on the UI.


Yeah, the more I fiddled around, the more neat stuff I found.
posted by not_on_display at 7:28 PM on May 9, 2016 [1 favorite]


Oh man I missed this bad news from Weatherspark
Switching the Dashboard to HTML5, which would offer more map options, would cost vastly more than any plausible return.
What a shame. I was wondering what justified all their investment in the first place, looks like it was designed to be an ad factory. Sigh.
posted by Nelson at 7:31 PM on May 9, 2016 [3 favorites]


Not to continue the derail but I too am very sad about weatherspark, to the point where I am seriously considering trying to build a replacement.
posted by ropeladder at 11:29 PM on May 9, 2016 [5 favorites]


I appreciate this is experimental, but if you need a video tutorial, surely that's telling you something?

The Weatherspark Dashboard was a truly beautiful thing; deep but intuitive. There seems to be a problem with Flash map availability, which is fair enough, but the interactive graphs were the main selling point. Multiple pleas for reinstatement will no doubt go unheeded - the developers seem to be at the end of their tether.

From a UK perspective, there is nothing in the same ballpark - especially when the Met Office gives us this (not a 1998 Wayback Machine link, btw).
posted by moonface at 5:13 AM on May 10, 2016


moonface, what a nice catalog of phone app screens that is!

Oh, wait... :7(
posted by wenestvedt at 6:22 AM on May 10, 2016




IS this thing a weatherspark replacement? Please, I want to see averages and history and multiple predictions of rain amounts so I can make my own decision about what the weather might be!
posted by rebent at 7:24 PM on May 10, 2016


Nelson: Although I haven't found it in action; anyone found a wind rose on the site?

Yes! I found one.

1) Click on a town, and a NWS graphical forecast window will open
2) Under the "Hourly Graph" Tab, at the bottom center of that tab, you will see a yellow button that says "Show Wind Rose"
3) Click on that.
posted by not_on_display at 6:45 PM on May 16, 2016 [1 favorite]


Oh yeah, thanks not_on_display. That's totally my code. Awesome!
posted by Nelson at 8:29 PM on May 16, 2016 [1 favorite]


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