Potatoes and cheese are friends!
September 16, 2016 1:41 PM   Subscribe

Aligot? It's a legendary blend of mashed potatoes, cheese, butter, cream, and garlic from the Aubrac region in France. Aligot en français. Aligot!
posted by Orange Dinosaur Slide (51 comments total) 46 users marked this as a favorite
 
Kraft Mac & Cheese can go hang; THIS is comfort food, by golly!
posted by Greg_Ace at 2:05 PM on September 16, 2016 [4 favorites]


Oh my God. I have a deep, deep abiding love for potatoes, and I really like cheese too. I watched that video with mouth agape, saying "Oh God, oh my God" over and over, until my husband asked me, "Are you having an orgasm right now?" ("Yes, a brain one," I responded.)

Where can one go to get such a dish if I don't happen to live in France? French Canada, perhaps?
posted by chainsofreedom at 2:17 PM on September 16, 2016


Serious Eats has a recipe.
posted by doctor_negative at 2:23 PM on September 16, 2016 [2 favorites]


i want to go to there.
posted by blue t-shirt at 2:26 PM on September 16, 2016 [3 favorites]


That legend is obvious, obvious bunk. There were no potatoes in Europe in 590, indeed the potato was introduced to Europe in the 16th century, but was only accepted as food for humans in France in the late 1700s.

Wikipedia says something about potatoes being "substituted" in the dish when they became available, but says nothing of what it was made with before. Some other kind of root vegetable, perhaps?
posted by Joakim Ziegler at 2:28 PM on September 16, 2016 [6 favorites]


This made my tummy smile and then cry because it wants some and I don't have any.
posted by Klaxon Aoooogah at 2:28 PM on September 16, 2016 [4 favorites]


(Recipes in English are the second and third links.)
posted by Orange Dinosaur Slide at 2:28 PM on September 16, 2016 [1 favorite]


I see you can use raclette, which you can actually get here, so for a moment I thought about making some, but then I remembered potatoes that work for mashing are non-existent in Mexico, and now I'm sad.
posted by Joakim Ziegler at 2:30 PM on September 16, 2016


Some fatty chunks of fried alligator actually wouldn't be bad in this.
posted by Burhanistan at 2:35 PM on September 16, 2016 [2 favorites]


If you're not making your mashed potatoes with cheese, butter, cream, and garlic by default, what the hell are you doing with your life?
posted by SansPoint at 2:39 PM on September 16, 2016 [39 favorites]


Seaweed, obviously.
posted by Bee'sWing at 2:49 PM on September 16, 2016 [1 favorite]


Some other kind of root vegetable, perhaps?

Before the potato, it was just butter, cheese, cream and garlic.
posted by mandolin conspiracy at 3:11 PM on September 16, 2016 [12 favorites]


... mashed potatoes, cheese, butter, cream, and garlic ...

'Cos it's all I got.
posted by ZenMasterThis at 3:14 PM on September 16, 2016 [2 favorites]


it's just so beautiful
posted by The Gaffer at 3:16 PM on September 16, 2016 [5 favorites]


The French Wikipedia page for aligot says that aligot was made with bread before it was made with potatoes.

I love delving into regional French specialties, thanks for these links!
posted by invokeuse at 3:29 PM on September 16, 2016 [2 favorites]


I love aligot. One of my go-to restaurants in Paris is Ambassade d'Auvergne, which has excellent aligot, otherwise decent food, and treats customers well. But every time I have aligot I'm a bit reminded of Ralph Wiggum eating paste.
posted by Nelson at 3:44 PM on September 16, 2016 [4 favorites]


So is there a way to mash up Aligot and Poutine for a comfort food overload?
posted by vuron at 4:07 PM on September 16, 2016 [3 favorites]


Homemade aligot in Figeac.
posted by Peter J. Prufrock at 4:11 PM on September 16, 2016


vuron: Breaded, deep-fried Aligot sticks, served with gravy and cheese curds.

And bacon.
posted by SansPoint at 4:19 PM on September 16, 2016 [1 favorite]


Serve with a chilled glass of Aligoté.
posted by progosk at 4:22 PM on September 16, 2016


Damn you, now I'm making this tonight. Will report back.
posted by Gaz Errant at 4:30 PM on September 16, 2016 [1 favorite]


One of my favorites to make in the winter.
posted by Nothing at 4:35 PM on September 16, 2016 [1 favorite]


This sounds like mashed potatoes to me. Have I been doing mashed potatoes wrong?
posted by kleinsteradikaleminderheit at 5:11 PM on September 16, 2016


The Auvergne region of France has a tasty cheese and potato dish called "truffade".
posted by w0mbat at 5:12 PM on September 16, 2016


I would love to try this. At least in the video, though, it really does look like one of those dishes that is best made in large batches, rather than in amounts suitable for one person.
posted by Dip Flash at 5:14 PM on September 16, 2016


Aligot is so good. One of the best French potato and cheese dishes and I tried quite a lo the year I lived in France (also truffade, tartiflette, raclette, gratin daupinois, fondue). The event I was at had one of those giant vats and paddles and the texture really is that elasticy. I'm not sure if the initiation rite of having to wear a crown of aligot the first time you eat it is something my friends made up or not but I definitely ended up with cheesy potatoes my head and it was totally worth it!
posted by carolr at 5:16 PM on September 16, 2016 [2 favorites]


Nelson, thank you so much for reminding me of the Ambassade d'Auvergne! I ate there many years ago, and recently couldn't remember it's name! The aligot there was delicious, and smothered a plate of fatty sausages.
posted by travellingincognito at 5:17 PM on September 16, 2016 [1 favorite]


"amounts suitable for one person" Try making it, and putting some of it in the freezer in containers. Then reheat it in the microwave and stir vigorously. It is worth a try, imagine having some of that on tap! You could always douse it in Tabasco for the reheat, on a winter's eve.
posted by Oyéah at 6:13 PM on September 16, 2016


Tabarnac.
posted by Jessica Savitch's Coke Spoon at 6:18 PM on September 16, 2016 [4 favorites]


Tabarnac indeed, I'm québécois and i spent my whole life not being aware of this
posted by CitoyenK at 6:23 PM on September 16, 2016 [1 favorite]


Each bishop had only brought with him a light snack thinking that the discussions would be short … alas!
The bishop of St-Flour had brought potatoes, the bishop of Rodez some fresh tome cheese, milk and butter, and the Bishop of Mende had brought salt, a precious spice then, and garlic, a plant recently imported from distant lands!


For those keeping track here, Mende's original plan was to eat a head of raw garlic with some salt
posted by Greg Nog at 6:35 PM on September 16, 2016 [19 favorites]


Throw some concentrated stock in there instead of the milk and that's just mashed potatoes in my house.
posted by Kreiger at 7:01 PM on September 16, 2016


I think folks saying "this is how I make mashed potatoes" are underestimating the amount of cheese involved. Also the amount of stirring. The texture becomes quite elastic and rubbery, as you can see in the video, it really doesn't resemble mashed potatoes when made properly. (Not to denigrate your delicious dairy-rich mashed potatoes, but really this is something different.)
posted by Nelson at 7:05 PM on September 16, 2016 [7 favorites]


Normal mashed potatoes get all messed up if you freeze them, something happens to the starch, I think. It might be that this fares better because of the cheese.
posted by Joakim Ziegler at 7:06 PM on September 16, 2016


Wikipedia says something about potatoes being "substituted" in the dish when they became available, but says nothing of what it was made with before. Some other kind of root vegetable, perhaps?

Probably some kind of turnip, which was the most commonly eaten root vegetable in northern Europe prior to the introduction of the potato.
posted by Dysk at 7:22 PM on September 16, 2016


...it really does look like one of those dishes that is best made in large batches, rather than in amounts suitable for one person.

Ha Ha.

First you make it thinking you are going to get 12 servings, and then...




BURP.
posted by BlueHorse at 7:38 PM on September 16, 2016 [3 favorites]


I think folks saying "this is how I make mashed potatoes" are underestimating the amount of cheese involved

Mmmmnnnnnope, I basically just learned a new word that means "how I already like my mashed potatoes".
posted by penduluum at 7:57 PM on September 16, 2016 [2 favorites]


Sir, I never underestimate the amount of cheese involved.
posted by rainy at 8:30 PM on September 16, 2016 [4 favorites]


Go ahead, people. Rave on. I'm going to be the turd in the punch bowl and say that this is pretty much like every incredibly unhealthful Metafilter thread loved by all: tasty but stupid. Eat your vegetables, people. Meat, too, if you'd like. Or quinoa. I don't care. But celebrating potatoes and cheese? Go check yo'self. (Although, in the spirit of humanitarianism, if you were to serve me a bowl of this shit, I'd eat it right up.)
posted by kozad at 8:35 PM on September 16, 2016


Um, potatoes is vegetables, cheese is also a kind of vegetables, and cream is almost vegetables. Now garlic is putrid and disgusting, I'm with you on that.
posted by rainy at 8:41 PM on September 16, 2016


"Normal mashed potatoes get all messed up if you freeze them, something happens to the starch, I think. It might be that this fares better because of the cheese."

Have "paid my dues" in terms of eating poor, including plenty of frozen mashed potatoes donated to charity from the hospital cafeteria, you can get them back to pretty good condition if you're patient. Just have to alternate microwaving and stirring several times until they re-absorb their moisture. Starch is actually pretty good for that sort of thing, but I have to emphasize how important patience is: not giving them the chance to re-absorb properly is what kills the texture and makes them "messed up". Gritty and/or wet means they didn't spend enough time resting. But I was surprised how fluffy and delicious they could get with practice.
posted by traveler_ at 9:34 PM on September 16, 2016 [1 favorite]


Now garlic is putrid and disgusting

I suppose such deranged balderdash can be expected from the sort of lunatic who conflates vegetables and dairy.
posted by Greg_Ace at 10:31 PM on September 16, 2016 [6 favorites]


Metafilter: such deranged balderdash
posted by shiny blue object at 6:41 AM on September 17, 2016 [5 favorites]


Dad made this with parmesan all through my childhood. We just called it Dad's Mashed Potatoes. I never imagined it represented a tradition. Neet!
posted by qbject at 10:28 AM on September 17, 2016


Seems like it would be uber salty if you used parmesan...
posted by Burhanistan at 11:22 AM on September 17, 2016


Hope you guys are also aware of that other French potato, garlic, cream and cheese dish, tartiflette. Even more delicious than aligot.
posted by tinkletown at 2:18 PM on September 17, 2016 [2 favorites]


Nice post, Orange D. Slide
posted by knuckle tattoos at 3:43 PM on September 17, 2016 [1 favorite]


Seems like it would be uber salty if you used parmesan...

Sure is!
posted by qbject at 3:49 PM on September 17, 2016


Hope you guys are also aware of that other French potato, garlic, cream and cheese dish, tartiflette. Even more delicious than aligot.

In December I visited Paris for the first time and had a meetup with the Paris Mefites. We got dinner at a bistro somewhere near the Gare de Lyon, and as we were checking out the menus, the following conversation happened -

ME: what's this dish here, "tartiflette"?

OTHER MEFITE WHOSE IDENTITY I'VE FORGOTTEN: oh, that's a traditional dish from Lyon. It's got potatoes, cheese, and bacon, and it's -

ME (interrupting): I'll take it.
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 5:54 PM on September 17, 2016 [5 favorites]


I made this today. I am in a cheese Coma.

I used half Raclette half Comté because Whole Foods didn't have any Tomme, but it turned out amazing. We paired it with Andouille sausage and a salad. And wine.

I am sitting on my couch eagerly awaiting the moment my stomach can hold more aligot.

I can't believe there was a form of cheese and potatoes unknown to me.

Thanks Metafilter!
posted by Lapin at 6:08 PM on September 21, 2016 [2 favorites]


Very late but EC that was Fraula who explained, delicious meal!
posted by ellieBOA at 5:03 AM on September 26, 2016 [1 favorite]


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