Microscopic time lapse films
March 28, 2017 2:38 PM   Subscribe

Stunningly clear video of cell division, followed by tadpole development.

Filmed by Francis Chee.
posted by lucidium (11 comments total) 22 users marked this as a favorite
 
Mind-blowing stuff!
posted by Atom Eyes at 2:59 PM on March 28, 2017


Would never have believed that it was not CGI. Fantastic to see.
posted by Sing Or Swim at 3:16 PM on March 28, 2017 [1 favorite]


I... I still don't believe it's not CGI. Aren't cells mostly transparent? For that matter, aren't tadpoles? Why do these look like they're made of clay?
posted by a car full of lions at 3:21 PM on March 28, 2017


Apparently, at a microscopic level, our bodies are basically indistinguishable from Play-Doh Fun Factories.
posted by Atom Eyes at 3:28 PM on March 28, 2017


These are amazing.
posted by fever-trees at 4:35 PM on March 28, 2017 [1 favorite]


acfof, the person responsible is answering things in the comments and confirms it is real. I would suspect the type of cell was chose because it had good visibility.
posted by tavella at 4:36 PM on March 28, 2017


I saw this the other day and the way the cells "unzip" in the cell division one freaks me out big time.
posted by Eyebrows McGee at 5:12 PM on March 28, 2017 [2 favorites]


Aren't cells mostly transparent? For that matter, aren't tadpoles? Why do these look like they're made of clay?

Most of the time you look at a cell with a microscope it's like holding tracing paper up to a light. It's very thin and you're shining a bright light through it. But most plant and animal tissue isn't transparent, so the cells probably aren't transparent if you're not shining a bright light through a single layer of cells.

So it's probably just the lighting that makes them look this way.
posted by straight at 8:38 PM on March 28, 2017 [1 favorite]


Why doesn't it increase in overall size?
posted by BentFranklin at 7:35 AM on March 29, 2017


Why doesn't it increase in overall size?

It would need to eat or in other ways take in mass in order to do that (or decrease in density). Early development is mostly about reorganizing and differentiating the resources present in the ovum, to produce a larva which is capable of consuming resources to fuel the rest of development. Prior to that point, the developing embryo can't really "eat," so its mass is fixed (actually, gradually decreasing as it uses up some of it to fuel development).
posted by biogeo at 8:22 AM on March 29, 2017 [3 favorites]


AAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH! Nightmare fuel. Chase it with close ups of spiders or something. So Geiger, the tadpole.
posted by Ogre Lawless at 2:04 PM on March 29, 2017


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