A Guinness and Sprite, please. (Is a thing)
July 11, 2018 1:00 AM   Subscribe

The Guinness and Sprite is a thing, at least in one bar in Seattle. Apparently “It's very English”. It's been made before; the Guinness goes on top as it is less dense. Guinness can also be half-and-halfed with other alcoholic drinks such as Blue Moon, Sam Adam's Cherry Wheat and Magners Cider. In a bar in Romania, a Dark Radler consists of a Guinness and Sprite ('Radler' being shandy in Germany). The Crown Float is half Guinness, half Strongbow. There's also the Guinness Martini, the St James’s Flip (Guinness, egg, condensed milk, rum, nutmeg), the Guinness Chocolate Float and Nutella Guinness stout chocolate milkshakes, the Badger (Guinness and Smirnoff Ice), and the Guinness Bloody Mary, containing Worcestershire Sauce.
posted by Wordshore (73 comments total) 15 users marked this as a favorite
 
This is a thing I have never encountered nor even contemplated, but, stout shandy: whyever not? I wouldn't mind trying it. Seems like the Australians have a similar thing in the shape of portagaf / portergaff.
posted by misteraitch at 1:17 AM on July 11 [1 favorite]


IMHO Guiness should never be mixed with anything, but if I ever have someone order a Guiness and Smirnoff Ice in one of my bars, I'll have them taken out back and shot in the head, for the good of humanity. You're welcome.
posted by conifer at 1:19 AM on July 11 [18 favorites]


I once ordered a radler in Germany thinking it was some kind of beer I hadn't heard of. My disappointment was reasonably visceral. There's so much beer to try in Germany and I'm drinking this?

A black and tan made with Guinness and a mediocre lager is pretty good though. DO NOT call it that in Ireland.
posted by deadwax at 1:20 AM on July 11 [6 favorites]


Yeah a portergaff can be good. I reckon you need a more robust stout though, Invalid works well. A mate of mine reckons that's an energy drink, I have seen him operate a 120cc chainsaw with a portergaff on the the go.
posted by deadwax at 1:23 AM on July 11 [1 favorite]


A black and tan made with Guinness and a mediocre lager is pretty good though. DO NOT call it that in Ireland.

Yeah, I was thinking of saying in the post that there are several well-known Guinness mixers and cocktails and the like that are named after things from the Irish War of Independence or the troubles, and it looked like a really bad idea ordering them by name.
posted by Wordshore at 1:24 AM on July 11 [7 favorites]


when I was growing up in Ireland ladies were often 'allowed' to add a dash of blackcurrant cordial to their 1/2 pint (natch) to sweeten the guinness....I never saw it being mixed with anything else even here in the UK.
posted by Wilder at 1:47 AM on July 11 [4 favorites]


Guinness makes up into a mighty fine gravy, but otherwise I’ll have mine unsullied, thanks.
posted by Nancy_LockIsLit_Palmer at 1:58 AM on July 11 [2 favorites]


It's still grim, but the only Guinness mixer I ever saw being ordered in the UK was Guinness & Black (i.e. Guinness + blackcurrent cordial to sweeten it up).
posted by pharm at 2:00 AM on July 11 [1 favorite]


Yeah, I was thinking of saying in the post that there are several well-known Guinness mixers and cocktails and the like that are named after things from the Irish War of Independence or the troubles, and it looked like a really bad idea ordering them by name.

Yep, "Irish car bomb" is borderline, I think because it's 'just' casually ignorant, but a cocktail sharing a name with an infamously brutal paramilitary force is much more likely to attract bad feelings in an Irish pub. Same thing happened when Ben & Jerry's released their Black and Tan flavour ice cream. They wisely pulled it but upon googling I see that Yuengling is selling much the same thing under the same name...

Without wanting to be too precious about the sanctity of Guinness - it's pretty much another big mass-market stout from Diageo, albeit one with a history - a lot of these really do sound incredibly awful, just plain bad in the mouth. The more dessert-y ones have a lot of potential though; bitter stout combining with the sweet creaminess of condensed milk sounds good. Guinness ice cream is an acquired taste but worth trying.
posted by ocular shenanigans at 2:10 AM on July 11 [4 favorites]


I can't believe that a Black Velvet in the traditional form of Guinness and champagne has not yet been mentioned.

I prefer my Guinness unsullied when drinking, but it works very well as an ingredient in things such as steak pie and a variety of desserts.
posted by electricinca at 2:43 AM on July 11 [4 favorites]


In Mayo (and anywhere you find Mayo people, which is everywhere), a pint of Special is a pint of Smithwicks with a Guinness head poured on top. Ends up being quite similar to Murphy's Red or Kilkenny, both of which are surprisingly rare in Irish pubs (only time I've ever had Murphy's Red was in the south of France).
posted by kersplunk at 2:48 AM on July 11 [3 favorites]


There's a Stout Russian, which is a Black Russian topped off with Guinness. Takes the edge off the sweetness. Drank quite a lot of these at University.
posted by parm at 2:48 AM on July 11 [1 favorite]


A Guinness and lager mix sounds like it'd be pretty nice. Similar to what the local watering home where I'm from in Denmark calls a half-n-half - half Hancock standard lager, half Hancock Old Gambrinus Dark (which I guess is kind of porterish? And over 9%). It's bloody delicious, and perfect for those hot summer evenings when drinking pints (actually half-litres or three-quarter-litres) of straight Gambrinus would just be a bit... heavy.
posted by Dysk at 3:03 AM on July 11 [1 favorite]


Now I really want a Høker, and Hancock isn't even available in all of Denmark, nevermind the West Midlands of the UK. Thanks Wordshore!
posted by Dysk at 3:06 AM on July 11 [1 favorite]


Aw man. Growing up we had German Shepherd dogs- big lovable cuddly things (unless you weren't part of their pack- I didn't understand why people didn't like them, then. ) To me, black and tan was a coat description. I had no idea until like just now that it was also the name of a brutal police force.
posted by freethefeet at 3:13 AM on July 11 [2 favorites]


Kersplunk, the story I was told was that Kilkenny and Smithwicks are the same thing in the same way that Bulmers and Magners are. It's Kilkenny outside of Ireland because Smithwicks both doesn't sound very Irish and has that silent W.

I haven't had a pint of either of them since I left Ireland over ten years ago, I wouldn't mind one.
posted by deadwax at 3:36 AM on July 11 [1 favorite]


I didn’t know about black and tan, either. I learn so much in Wordshore’s posts. I genuinely thought deadwax meant it was OK to order a black and tan but you should never call it pretty good, which confused the hell out of me. There’s a black and white ice cream sundae in US which gets its name from the vanilla ice cream, chocolate sauce, and marshmallow fluff. So black and tan did not register with me as a bad thing because I did not have any context as an ignorant N’merican. Thank you for the clarification, freethefeet!
posted by Bella Donna at 3:36 AM on July 11 [3 favorites]


Guinness and cider “snake bite”. Enjoyed them before I learned to drink Guinness straight.
posted by gryphonlover at 3:52 AM on July 11 [2 favorites]


Let's all take a moment of silence for the short-lived whisky-based monstrosity that was "Bell's Irn Bru".
posted by Catseye at 4:04 AM on July 11 [1 favorite]



Kersplunk, the story I was told was that Kilkenny and Smithwicks are the same thing in the same way that Bulmers and Magners are. It's Kilkenny outside of Ireland because Smithwicks both doesn't sound very Irish and has that silent W.


They sell Smithwicks here in the US but I've never heard it pronounced with a silent W.
posted by octothorpe at 4:10 AM on July 11 [1 favorite]


Guinness and a large Tia Maria tastes like chocolate milkshake. Ideal hangover beverage.
posted by fatfrank at 4:22 AM on July 11 [3 favorites]


That so called Guinness martini is a fucking abomination, and has no business being called a martini. It shares nothing with that fine drink other than a glass. A Guinness martini, should such a thing exist (it shouldn't) would be Guinness diluted and defizzed by being stirred with ice, then served in a tiny glass with a given few drops of vermouth splashed in its general direction, and an olive. The bullshit concoction of Guiness, creme de cacao and coffee is at best an Irish iced coffee. And even then, fuck the chocolate bollocks off and replace it with whiskey. Martini indeed!

They sell Smithwicks here in the US but I've never heard it pronounced with a silent W.

Just thinking about that is making me cringe hard enough to develop a full body shudder.
posted by Dysk at 4:26 AM on July 11 [8 favorites]


They sell Smithwicks here in the US but I've never heard it pronounced with a silent W.

Just ... {imagines} ... oh god ...
posted by Wordshore at 4:29 AM on July 11 [5 favorites]


Yep, "Irish car bomb" is borderline, I think because it's 'just' casually ignorant

The awful sports bar chain Twisted Kilt calls it a "Belfast Boom," which somehow manages to be even more offensive.
posted by Faint of Butt at 4:32 AM on July 11 [1 favorite]


That's why they should have run with Kilkenny in the US too.
posted by deadwax at 4:32 AM on July 11


They sell Smithwicks here in the US but I've never heard it pronounced with a silent W.

Just a counterpoint: that's the only way I've heard it. Thankfully.

Also I would definitely drink a Guinness Bloody Mary, although truthfully that recipe seems like a Bloody Mary with just a whiff of stout.
posted by uncleozzy at 4:35 AM on July 11 [1 favorite]


Kersplunk, the story I was told was that Kilkenny and Smithwicks are the same thing in the same way that Bulmers and Magners are. It's Kilkenny outside of Ireland because Smithwicks both doesn't sound very Irish and has that silent W.

Kilkenny used to be relabelled export Smithwicks, but no longer.
Kilkenny is similar to Smithwick's Draught, however, has less hop finish, and it has a nitrogenated cream head similar to Guinness. The 'Kilkenny' name was originally used during the 1980s and 1990s to market a stronger version of Smithwick's for the European and Canadian market due to difficulty in pronunciation of the word 'Smithwick's'. It now refers to a similar yet distinct beer.
posted by zamboni at 4:45 AM on July 11 [1 favorite]


I try to avoid drinking big corporate beers but I had a Guinness last Friday and it was still quite good. Funny though that it tastes like a light beer now after drinking micros for so long.
posted by octothorpe at 4:47 AM on July 11


Red Robin restaurants has a Guinness Milk Shake. It tastes like a really good chocolate shake, but no real "Guinness" flavor to it.

And yeah - "Smiticks" is how I've heard it pronounced in Irish pubs all across the US.

I've actually drifted back to drinking Guinness more often - it's relatively low in alcohol and calories compared to the micro IPAs I've been drinking for the last 10 years.
posted by COD at 5:01 AM on July 11


I don't know about the other stuff, but a Guinness ice cream float is pretty decent. Not quite as good as a Nitro Milk Stout float though.
posted by Foosnark at 5:44 AM on July 11


Black Velvets are great except for the unfortunate side effect of too many of them making me sound like Rowley Birkin QC.
posted by Mocata at 5:54 AM on July 11 [3 favorites]


Guinness can also be half-and-halfed with other alcoholic drinks such as Blue Moon, Sam Adam's Cherry Wheat and Magners Cider. (emphasis mine)

I mean... tautologically, yes, you can mix anything with stout and have yourself a proper half-and-half. I wouldn't recommend trying it with kerosene, rubbing alcohol, or Sam Adams Cherry Wheat, though. (Why not just mix it with grape Kool-Aid? Why not crush up and snort a Pixie Stick between sips of Guinness?)
posted by Mayor West at 5:58 AM on July 11 [6 favorites]


Is it still okay to just have a Guinness? Asking for a friend.
posted by tommasz at 6:00 AM on July 11 [4 favorites]


Doesn't everybody accumulate two bottles of Cherry Wheat every year when somebody brings over a variety 12-pack? Pretty sure I've got at least six of various ages in the basement. May as well use it somehow.
posted by uncleozzy at 6:01 AM on July 11 [4 favorites]


Kilkenny and Smithwicks are the same thing

Both Kilkenny and Smithwicks are common here, and said with a silent W (Canada).

Went through a period where I drank Guiness and cider and it was always an adventure figuring out what it was called in this particular faux-Irish establishment. Crown float? Snakebite? Something else? Wil they take the order confidently and then bring a tequila shooter or some fruity cocktail?
posted by rodlymight at 6:03 AM on July 11 [2 favorites]


> tommasz:
"Is it still okay to just have a Guinness? Asking for a friend."

Tommasz, while yer up, ta.
posted by chavenet at 6:12 AM on July 11 [4 favorites]


A friend of mine used to drink Guinness and condensed milk when she was breastfeeding. apparently it's a Jamaican thing - she called it "strong drink". It actually didn't taste too horrible, but it looked revolting. The only other things I've seen it mixed with are blackcurrant (Guinness and black) which has an interesting pink head, Guinness and cider (goth drink of preference in my day) and Black Velvet. I did once see someone drinking a a Guinness and Pernod, which looked like a pint of tea with a head and presumably tasted like death.

Personally, I don't even like the stuff, but I would be afraid to drink Guinness mixed with anything, for fear the many of my ancestors who worked in the brewery in Dublin would collectively haunt me forever.
posted by Fuchsoid at 6:22 AM on July 11 [2 favorites]


In college a few friends and I were exposed to the black and tan in a local bar and we really liked them. We thought we would save some money and make them at home, so we bought some bottles of Guinness and some bottles of pale ale and gave it a try.

The floating only works with Guinness from the tap, not from a bottle. The beers just mixed together like any two liquids normally would. This was before the nitrogen-loaded cans were available--maybe if you used one of those it would work, I haven't tried it.
posted by Quonab at 6:25 AM on July 11 [1 favorite]


It's not mixed with Guinness specifically, but there's certain parts of Germany where a "Diesel" is half beer, half Coca Cola. Gah.
posted by rednikki at 6:36 AM on July 11 [1 favorite]


If calling something a Black and Tan is bad, I'm going to have to relearn. My first exposure to the term was via school in Pennsylvania and drinking Yuenglings and I just thought it was a way to refer to a heavier and a lighter beer mixed together.
posted by PussKillian at 6:39 AM on July 11 [2 favorites]


Kill it with fire
posted by Damienmce at 7:02 AM on July 11 [2 favorites]


It's not mixed with Guinness specifically, but there's certain parts of Germany where a "Diesel" is half beer, half Coca Cola. Gah.

See also “Colaweizen”.

My understanding was that in an actual Irish establishment where “black and tan” was likely to cause offense, you’d order a “half and half” and get an equivalent drink. Do not know for sure though.
posted by Huffy Puffy at 7:06 AM on July 11 [5 favorites]


omg colaweizen, I can't wait to put that in me.
posted by uncleozzy at 7:13 AM on July 11 [1 favorite]


There's a thing my in-laws do in PA which is to put black pepper in Yuengling Black & Tan (yes, it comes pre-mixed). I don't think it has a name, though.

Also, my neighbor makes ice cream with Guinness Stout.
posted by lagomorphius at 7:26 AM on July 11 [1 favorite]


Yes, ordering a "half and half" will get you a layered dark and light beer, and cause no offense. Depending on the local dialect, the name might be closer to "'arf 'n' 'arf." Furthermore, a "half" in many establishments is known to refer to a half pint of beer, as opposed to a full pint, so a local who only wants a small drink may well order "'arf 'n' 'arf 'n' 'arf."

And regarding Yuengling, it used to be my go-to lager, but I can no longer drink it after learning the owner is a hardline Trumpist.
posted by Faint of Butt at 7:30 AM on July 11 [5 favorites]


And regarding Yuengling, it used to be my go-to lager, but I can no longer drink it after learning the owner is a hardline Trumpist.

That gave me such a sad. I do guiltily drink a Lord Chesterfield occasionally though.
posted by octothorpe at 7:35 AM on July 11 [2 favorites]


Shandy is one thing I'll never get used to in the UK. It's hilarious how Londoners will mock the Spanish for doing a similar thing with wine, and then go guzzle a lemony beer cooler on the pub stoop.

It's kind of a regional stereotype among folks "oop neuuuth", too. Apparently anyone on the other side of Hadrian's Wall is a "shandy-drinkin' Southerner", as if the lack of regular strong booze is something that makes us all weak.

I'll admit, I haven't stooped to even tasting shandy. It just goes against my upbringing in the salad days of the craft beer movement in the US.
posted by rum-soaked space hobo at 7:37 AM on July 11 [1 favorite]


On the subject of mixed drinks and the spanish, when I opened my first bar here in Spain and locals would order a calimocho, we thought it was a joke (once we found out what it was). Coke and red wine. I still shudder.
posted by conifer at 7:47 AM on July 11 [2 favorites]


When I was about 15, I remember getting something London that was Guinness, hard cider and a shot of amaretto. It was at a punk rock bar called the Intrepid Fox. I think they called it a Snake Bite.
posted by slogger at 7:55 AM on July 11 [1 favorite]


That so called Guinness martini is a fucking abomination, and has no business being called a martini. It shares nothing with that fine drink other than a glass.

This bears repeating. And goes for many drinks with martini in their names.
posted by Splunge at 7:56 AM on July 11 [4 favorites]


There is no more terrible mixer than the Pabst-Smir.

Trust me.
posted by notsnot at 8:25 AM on July 11 [2 favorites]


A tip to the wise: make a shandy with ginger ale instead of lemonade, and it adds the sharpness to tone down the excessive sweetness you'd get from ordinary lemonade.

(Note: this applies to UK drinks, your mixers may be quite different in other places)
posted by vincebowdren at 8:48 AM on July 11 [2 favorites]


When I was about 15, I remember getting something London that was Guinness, hard cider and a shot of amaretto. It was at a punk rock bar called the Intrepid Fox. I think they called it a Snake Bite.

One of the local bars here in my neighborhood in Chicago calls a half cider/half lager a Snake Bite.
posted by lagomorphius at 8:52 AM on July 11 [2 favorites]


That Guinness and Sprite should be called a Deepwater Horizon
posted by Mr.Encyclopedia at 8:54 AM on July 11 [5 favorites]


Guinness was the first "foreign" beer I encountered as a child. I was well familiar with all the various Molson & Labatt products that older relatives drank but Guinness was elevated in a weird way. Generally, it was rarely drank except by my great grandfather who swore by it as a cure all as he believed it helped my great grandmother with her anemia. He usually drank it straight but occasionally he'd drink it mixed with his home made alcoholic spruce beer (also "medicinal" which he'd sometimes cold distill [I think that's what he was doing] to make a bit stronger). He did work road maintenance well into his late 70s and he often cited this "tonic" as the reason.

I'd forgotten about Guinness for years until I started drinking Black & Tans, which were a popular among my crowd, in university. Eventually I just switched to Guinness as I couldn't be arsed.
posted by Ashwagandha at 8:56 AM on July 11 [1 favorite]


Was at a brew pub somewhere in New England several years ago and they offered a Black and Orange, which was Guinness over a pumpkin ale. I was suitably skeptical, but had to try it. It was actually quite nice. Paired really well with my food.
posted by It's Raining Florence Henderson at 9:04 AM on July 11 [2 favorites]


An old friend used to favour Guinness and port.
posted by Jode at 9:11 AM on July 11 [1 favorite]


They sell Smithwicks here in the US but I've never heard it pronounced with a silent W.

I've only heard the W pronounced once here in the US, by me, just before I felt the ghost of my Irish grandmother slap the back of my head while the bartender more kindly simply repeated my order except correctly.

A black and tan made with Guinness and a mediocre lager is pretty good though. DO NOT call it that in Ireland.

That's as may be, but there's a Guinness brewery just opened up in Maryland and when I visited the taproom 'black and tan' was up on the chalkboard as an option. Bonus of having it there is, regardless of the name, no need for a mediocre lager, their own Blonde Lager is pretty solid.
posted by solotoro at 9:16 AM on July 11 [2 favorites]


Black and Orange, which was Guinness over a pumpkin ale

The Halloween! My local does this when they have pumpkin on tap. Guinness and Elysian Night Owl is pretty good.
posted by uncleozzy at 9:16 AM on July 11 [2 favorites]


It probably helps to note that the default for "lemonade" in the UK is more like the schweppes fizzy lemonade or sprite than the "water/lemons/sugar" stuff that's more common in the US. You have to ask for "fresh lemonade" here even if it comes from a mix, if that's the stuff you want.

Don't get me started on when someone uses the word "fresh" to describe food.

"By fresh, do you mean not preserved, or not spoiled?"
"Uh, I think we just mean rilly nice, sir?"

Next up: when restaurants describe menu items as "homemade".
posted by rum-soaked space hobo at 9:23 AM on July 11 [3 favorites]


The Maryland Renaissance Festival does the Snake Bite (not Gunniness but a Stout none the less) and Cider and they also do something they call a Bee Sting, Stout and Mead.
posted by ShawnString at 9:56 AM on July 11 [2 favorites]


I had a hobbit moment when I learned you can get a double pour of mead at MDRF.

"It comes in pints!?"
posted by Faint of Butt at 10:30 AM on July 11 [3 favorites]


The idea of mixing Guinness with anything just confuses my mouth. Then again, most of the combinations that've been listed in the thread have been fairly sweet, and I just can't do sweet booze most of the time. Then again, a shandy after tromping around the Lakes last summer was exactly the right thing.
posted by Making You Bored For Science at 10:42 AM on July 11 [1 favorite]


I sneered at kalimotxo, too, until I had it on a blistering hot day in Boise, ID at a Basque bar - I converted RIGHT fucking quick, because it is amazing!
posted by ersatzkat at 11:28 AM on July 11 [1 favorite]


No reference to the magic of a Guinness Punch?
posted by CheapB at 11:31 AM on July 11 [1 favorite]


Guinness was the first "foreign" beer I encountered as a child.

Does anybody remember a couple years during the 80s when Watneys Red Barrel was suddenly everywhere on the east coast in the US, and advertised as a super high-end import? That was the first "foreign" beer I encountered. I even had a set of Watneys glasses I picked up at a yard sale. And then one day Watney's Red Barrel was nowhere, and it was like everybody had forgotten about it.
posted by lagomorphius at 12:06 PM on July 11 [1 favorite]


Nothing like an Irish car bomb at 8 a.m. to start your St. Patrick's Day kegs 'n' eggs celebration.
posted by DrAstroZoom at 12:19 PM on July 11 [1 favorite]


I recall going into a liquor store in Albuquerque back in the late 90s and almost falling over laughing at the sight of Watneys Red Barrel being sold as a premium imported beer.

Red Barrel was almost the founding cause célèbre of the Campaign for Real Ale, a beer so awful that it became the platonic non-ideal of fizzy, tasteless, industrially-manufactured Crap Beer.
posted by Major Clanger at 12:19 PM on July 11 [5 favorites]


Quonab - are you sure? I remember pouring Guinness from bottles over a half glass of Harp and it worked just fine.

I'm actually not sure if the nitrogenated spinner cans will work.

The secret to getting good separation is to make sure that both liquids are as cold as possible. I learned this trick pouring compound sucrose gradient centrifugation columns in a lab without air conditioning during an Iowa summer.

Also, 'slide' the top liquid down the side of the tilted glass, never directly onto the bottom liquid.
posted by porpoise at 4:22 PM on July 11 [1 favorite]


"...and stopping at Majorcan bodegas selling fish and chips and Watney's Red Barrel and calamaris and two veg and sitting in their cotton frocks squirting Timothy White's suncream all over their puffy raw swollen purulent flesh 'cos they 'overdid it on the first day.' "
posted by Chrysostom at 4:45 PM on July 11 [6 favorites]


When I was traveling in Ghana, I got hooked on Castle (milk stout) and Coke. I was never able to replicate it back in the US -- not sure if it's due to the milk stout and/or Coke being different, my palate being different due to differences in Ghanaian vs western diet, or just nostalgia.
posted by bassooner at 5:05 PM on July 11 [2 favorites]


Oh yeah, that's a good part of the world for finding the opportunity to taste things mixed with Coke and Fanta. I don't think I ever tried it with Castle since it was so hard to find in neighboring Burkina Faso, but I can say with some certainty that I do not like red wine and coke, I do not like white wine and coke, I do not like sangria and coke, I do not like lager and coke. Lager and Fanta is ok.
posted by solotoro at 4:53 AM on July 12 [1 favorite]


Most of these Guinness mixes would taste even better when made with a good Imperial Stout from your local microbrewery!
posted by monotreme at 8:55 AM on July 12 [1 favorite]


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