Why is this haggadah different from all other haggadot?
April 8, 2019 9:36 AM   Subscribe

The Jewish Worker has compiled a list of haggadot for your social justice seder (twitter)

"In Search of Freedom, Exploring Common Ground," African-American Jewish Task Force (2009)

"Next Year In A Just World," American Jewish World Service (2017)

"After Exodus: Living the Lessons of Passover," Jews Against the Occupation (2005)

"Living Our Commitment: Jewish Voices for Liberation (A Black Lives Matter Haggadah)," Jews for Racial and Economic Justice (2015)

"GLBT Passover Haggadah," JQ International (2008)

"It's time for the dough to rise - Labor Seder," Jews United for Justice (2014)

"Solidarity - Labor Seder," Jews United for Justice (2015)

"Passover Haggadah," Jewish Voice for Peace (2016)

"Love & Justice in Times of War Haggadah," Dara Silverman & Micah Bazant (2003)

"On The Road to Freedom," Joseph Gindi & Emilia Diament (2009)

"The Stonewall Seder," Congregation B'nai Jeshurun (2007)

"The Common Road to Freedom," The Religious Action Center (1989)

"Invisible: The Story of Modern Day Slavery," The Religious Action Center (2016)

"Food & Justice Haggadah Supplement," Uri L'Tzedek (2011)

"The Freedom Seder," Rabbi Arthur Waskow (1969)

"From Chains to Change: A Haggadah Supplement," Moral Voices/Penn Hillel

"Mah Nishtana: Questioning at the Seder Table," Jewish Voice for Peace (2009)

"Haggadah Supplement," HIAS (2017)

"The Global Refugee Crisis Haggadah Supplement," HIAS (2019)

Need more? Jew School has links to 101 Social Justice Haggadot and Supplements, and Avodah links to others. A few of these have been linked to previously.
posted by ChuraChura (15 comments total) 35 users marked this as a favorite
 
This is great! And I totally didn't just double check to make sure Passover wasn't starting tonight!
posted by dinty_moore at 9:42 AM on April 8, 2019 [4 favorites]


Life was so much easier when it was Maxwell House and nothing else. /s
posted by Melismata at 10:40 AM on April 8, 2019 [2 favorites]


Life was so much easier when it was Maxwell House and nothing else. /s

On that note, Maxwell House heard you like nostalgia, so they put nostalgia in your nostalgia, and have released a Marvelous Mrs. Maisel branded version for this year.

But seriously, thanks so much for posting this, ChuraChura! Lots of good stuff to chose from here.
posted by damayanti at 10:43 AM on April 8, 2019 [6 favorites]


My father has collected haggadot since I was kid, with a rule of "add at least one new one to the collection every year." The collection is substantial.

That, and the Family Matzah Museum: one extra box of Manischewitz' matzah saved for posterity and amusement.

The oldest one in the collection is dated 1985. Yes, we have one (or more) for each intervening year.
posted by Making You Bored For Science at 10:47 AM on April 8, 2019 [4 favorites]


MYBFS i think there needs to be a blind taste test at some point to determine exactly how old matzah needs to be before you can tell a vintage sheet from a fresh one.
posted by Exceptional_Hubris at 11:08 AM on April 8, 2019 [5 favorites]


I love Haggadot and I love Passover, apart from I hate being now the inevitable host of a high-stress 30-minute Seder with my two school-age kids, raised-Methodist husband and my mom. Nobody we know hosts a multi-family Seder and I'm too pre-frazzled to expand ours further. At least everyone has the day off for Good Friday this year!.
posted by chesty_a_arthur at 11:27 AM on April 8, 2019 [1 favorite]


The oldest one in the collection is dated 1985

Solar or lunar calendar?
posted by overeducated_alligator at 12:11 PM on April 8, 2019 [6 favorites]


A friend of mine recently Kickstarted A Haggadah of Our Own, a radically-inclusive Passover Haggadah with updated language, improved accessibility, and inclusion advice.
posted by fifteen schnitzengruben is my limit at 12:34 PM on April 8, 2019 [5 favorites]


Solar. The collection predates my birth by a year.
posted by Making You Bored For Science at 3:44 PM on April 8, 2019


I love Haggadot and I love Passover, apart from I hate being now the inevitable host of a high-stress 30-minute Seder with my two school-age kids, raised-Methodist husband and my mom.

You could try what my parents did: I have two siblings and five cousins who would show up reliably for seders, so we made motzi after karpas, so we could have matzah meal rolls and salad early in the evening and the kids could go play for a bit.
posted by dialMforMara at 7:11 PM on April 8, 2019


We always have a vegetable tray for after karpas; I got the idea from my rabbi, and keep it up because I get super cranky if I get hungry.

also, we've decided that we should be more observant of the command to recline - and thus do most of the seder sitting on comfy couches in the living room, rather than at a table.

add in a few passover-disney parodies, and Elijah's your uncle for a more relaxed seder.
posted by jb at 9:09 PM on April 8, 2019 [2 favorites]


and I'm too pre-frazzled to expand ours further.
chesty_a_arthur, may I please have this word "pre-frazzled" for use, because I can already think of any number of situations to which it can be effectively applied (not uniquely, but especially as a Jewish woman)?
posted by huimangm at 9:45 PM on April 8, 2019 [2 favorites]


Wow, this is revelatory, snacks during the Seder. I moved far away from my family of origin, but for years I spiced things up by doing the normal Four Questions and then a second set, drawn from some sort of cultural thing - the first ever set was from Who Put the Bomp, the second from Shakespeare (mainly sonnets), etc.
posted by wellred at 8:21 AM on April 9, 2019


Even better: my friend went digging into the Talmud, and found that the current seder order most people use is actually from the Gemara, and the Mishnah is different! And you eat more earlier. I can't remember the details, but I've been to his seder and I like the older order.

Judaism: Pick your favourite tradition, there are probably several.
posted by jb at 11:03 AM on April 9, 2019 [2 favorites]


The Freedom Seder is what my spouse's family uses (although he thinks theirs is older than 1969). As a Presbyterian married into a Reconstructionist family, I adore Passover.
posted by hydropsyche at 2:52 PM on April 9, 2019


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