"Corn dog" is an unnecessarily restrictive term
August 15, 2019 6:37 PM   Subscribe

Korean youtuber Foodie Boy provides a 19 minute documentary on the wares of Hotdog Chopchop, a restaurant in Seoul that deep-fries things like hot dogs on sticks.

A few years back westerners took notice of their french fries on hot dogs on sticks (previously), which you can make at home, but the hot dog on stick form factor has been common in South Korea street food for over a dozen years. Variations have been proliferating, for example the squid ink and mozzarella dog available at Myungrang Hot Dog and the churros corn dog.

You might also have noticed by now that "hot dogs" aren't necessarily the American notion of hot dogs, the term gets applied to similarly-shaped food fried and served on sticks, such as cheese and, well, other things. However, don't get them confused with fish cakes.
posted by ardgedee (18 comments total) 12 users marked this as a favorite
 
Self link: I have had a french fry dog at a streetside stand in the Yongsan district, and it was magnificent.
posted by ardgedee at 6:40 PM on August 15, 2019 [1 favorite]


I'm a vegetarian but they didn't really lose me until they started glazing them and putting sprinkles on.
posted by aubilenon at 6:55 PM on August 15, 2019


they started glazing them and putting sprinkles on

I'm not a vegetarian, and that was when they lost me, too. The basic idea is interesting, but not with sprinkles.
posted by Dip Flash at 7:20 PM on August 15, 2019


*unimpressed face* As a Minnesotan coming up on the State Fair in a couple weeks, I consider this barely entry-level.
posted by Autumnheart at 7:23 PM on August 15, 2019 [3 favorites]


However, don't get them confused with fish cakes.

I love fish cakes/fish balls.

This technique in that video is pretty impressive.
posted by mandolin conspiracy at 7:36 PM on August 15, 2019 [9 favorites]


This technique in that video is pretty impressive.

Wut? Wow!
posted by sjswitzer at 7:47 PM on August 15, 2019


Holy unintentional ASMR.
posted by schoolgirl report at 7:53 PM on August 15, 2019 [1 favorite]


apropos of as little as possible but Korn, dawg
posted by cortex at 7:58 PM on August 15, 2019


Fried corndog batter is one of humanity's greatest culinary discoveries.
posted by rhizome at 9:25 PM on August 15, 2019


Wow, fishcakedog guy is my hero. I could watch that all day, and you know he's got more preparations than just those. I would love to be able to prepare anything with that degree of expertise, and I don't care if it's mostly k-krab and goldfish penises, I need to eat all of it.
posted by rhizome at 9:34 PM on August 15, 2019


Apropos of nothing, I suppose beyond my desire to advance Metafilter's drive towards international linguistic diversity, but corn dogs are called Pogos in Canada (after the main brand that makes them). Even when they are not Pogo brand corn dogs they are simply called Pogos. Knowing is half the battle.
posted by Ashwagandha at 9:08 AM on August 16, 2019 [1 favorite]


Had me at the crouton batter, lost me at the glaze and sprinkles. Unless they're savory sprinkles of some sort. One hopes one could request one without the sugary blasphemy.
posted by dazed_one at 9:21 AM on August 16, 2019


Apropos of nothing, I suppose beyond my desire to advance Metafilter's drive towards international linguistic diversity, but corn dogs are called Pogos in Canada (after the main brand that makes them). Even when they are not Pogo brand corn dogs they are simply called Pogos. Knowing is half the battle.

I wonder if "Pogo" was chosen as a name because it works in both English and French? I have to say that the on the French side of the packaging, "saucisses fumées enrobées de pâtes cuites sur un bâton," really elevates the product above the English "cooked battered weiner on a stick."

Also, I just realized that Yves Veggie Cuisine (they make pretty darn good veggie weiners) makes a veggie corn dog. They could have called it a "Nogo."
posted by mandolin conspiracy at 9:42 AM on August 16, 2019 [2 favorites]


"saucisses fumées enrobées de pâtes cuites sur un bâton," really elevates the product above the English "cooked battered weiner on a stick."

Funny, I always find that the French is so clinical as they often reduce the food product to the bluntly named constituent parts and sometimes a bit weird if you read it quickly and take the words out of context. For example, Enrobées de pâtes means coated in dough but the word pâtes is also the word for pasta. So imagine that - a Pogo/corn dog clad in pasta instead of corn meal batter? I bet you can find something like that at a macaroni and cheese food truck at the fair.
posted by Ashwagandha at 10:23 AM on August 16, 2019


So imagine that - a Pogo/corn dog clad in pasta instead of corn meal batter?

Ooh.

I mean, some people like to put hot dogs in their instant mac and cheese, so I mean...this sounds logical.
posted by mandolin conspiracy at 11:12 AM on August 16, 2019


Had me at the crouton batter, lost me at the glaze and sprinkles. Unless they're savory sprinkles of some sort. One hopes one could request one without the sugary blasphemy.

Savory and sweet food combinations are very popular in Korea. Some recent food trends are the Inkigayo sandwich (egg salad and jam) and Honey Butter potato chips. I suspect its because red bean has been a part of the diet for many years so the idea of mixing sweet and savory is not so unusual.
posted by cazoo at 11:28 AM on August 16, 2019


I was just in Melbourne and had one of these wonderful french-fry dogs. It was hard to pick between it and the one apparently clad in crunchy ramen noodles, but I feel I made the right decision.

I also was able to get, thanks to the many Chinese bakeries around, a hot dog inside a doughnut. The doughnut was only slightly sweet, and the two combined very well and I ate way too many of them (along with my own body weight in egg tarts). Then again, I'm half Filipino and sweet-savory is a big thing in that foodway.
posted by PussKillian at 12:00 PM on August 16, 2019


> Had me at the crouton batter

Those are potato chunks.

As for the syrup and sprinkles: Yeah, that looked amusingly off to me too. But there's more sugar in the ketchup than the pinch of jimmies so the garnish seems more cosmetic than anything else.
posted by ardgedee at 2:40 PM on August 16, 2019


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