Toby Roland-Jones not mentioned
September 20, 2019 4:45 PM   Subscribe

 


I blame Joan Hunter-Dunn.
posted by Devonian at 6:09 PM on September 20, 2019 [1 favorite]


Maurice Jones-Drew's story is cool.
posted by look busy at 6:20 PM on September 20, 2019 [1 favorite]




KeyPeeleEastWestBowl.mkv
posted by glonous keming at 6:40 PM on September 20, 2019 [5 favorites]


They’re going to need smaller letters for the jerseys.

Or broader shoulders.
posted by ricochet biscuit at 7:39 PM on September 20, 2019


I have a burning question. What happens if two people with two different hyphenated last names get married and decide to combine names? Do they pick one name out of each surname to combine, or hyphenate all four together?
posted by captain afab at 9:38 PM on September 20, 2019 [4 favorites]


They factor their names together. Remember: FOIL.
posted by startled at 9:51 PM on September 20, 2019 [21 favorites]


They-Just-Keep-Going.
posted by amanda at 9:57 PM on September 20, 2019


I have a burning question. What happens if two people with two different hyphenated last names get married and decide to combine names? Do they pick one name out of each surname to combine, or hyphenate all four together?
In my case I had a hyphenated last name though my husband didn't. I picked one of my last names to give to my son and hyphenated with my husband's last name. It's honestly not such a big deal. See also Spanish naming traditions.
posted by peacheater at 10:22 PM on September 20, 2019 [5 favorites]


@captain afab: Most of the world uses the most patriarchal name to pass to the children. So son's inherit the last name from their father.

The hyphenated approach can gender balance and also appease tradition: Male partners pass down their father's portion of the last name to their children and wives pass down their mother's portion of their last name to their children. So the father's name keeps on propagating through their sons while it disappears when their daughters wed. But the addition is that the mother's name keeps on propagating through their daughters while it disappears when their sons wed.

The paternal grandmother's name disappears and the maternal grandfather's name disappears and the children just receive a new hyphenated name with paternal grandfather's name and the maternal grandmother's name. Only the most patriarchical and most matriacharchical name halves survive into the grandchildren.

But it's just a name and if my children don't like the hyphen, I'll tell them to name their children whatever they want. I tried doing the alternating sibiling last names, but I received blowback from my parents, but I also didn't want to continue only my name to my children as that wouldn't have been fair to my wife.
posted by DetriusXii at 10:46 PM on September 20, 2019 [1 favorite]


"The hyphenated approach can gender balance and also appease tradition: Male partners pass down their father's portion of the last name to their children and wives pass down their mother's portion of their last name to their children. So the father's name keeps on propagating through their sons while it disappears when their daughters wed. But the addition is that the mother's name keeps on propagating through their daughters while it disappears when their sons wed."

That was the plan when my ex-wife and I hyphenated our names thirty years ago. It's a good scheme; the equality and symmetry are very pleasing to me. I thought I was pretty clever to come up with it, though many other people (I've since learned) have had the same idea.
posted by Ivan Fyodorovich at 11:30 PM on September 20, 2019


From Wikipedia:

In British tradition, a double surname is heritable, and mostly taken in order to preserve a family name which would have become extinct due to the absence of male descendants bearing the name. [...] A few British upper-class families have "triple-barrelled" surnames (e.g. Anstruther-Gough-Calthorpe; Cave-Browne-Cave; Elliot-Murray-Kynynmound; Heathcote-Drummond-Willoughby; Smith-Dorrien-Smith; Vane-Tempest-Stewart). [...] There are even a few "quadruple-barrelled" surnames (e.g. Hepburn-Stuart-Forbes-Trefusis, Hovell-Thurlow-Cumming-Bruce, Montagu-Stuart-Wortley-Mackenzie, Plunkett-Ernle-Erle-Drax and Stirling-Home-Drummond-Moray). The surname of the extinct family of the Dukes of Buckingham and Chandos was the quintuple-barrelled Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-Grenville.

The one I find most puzzling there is "Cave-Browne-Cave". Why do they need two Caves?
posted by Paul Slade at 12:35 AM on September 21, 2019 [3 favorites]


No discussion long names on the backs of jerseys is complete without Jan Vennegoor of Hesselink.
posted by Bloxworth Snout at 2:32 AM on September 21, 2019 [5 favorites]


I'd like to see someone use a + sign rather than a hyphen. Just to mess with the backend devs.
posted by srboisvert at 4:12 AM on September 21, 2019 [4 favorites]


or god forbid an ampersand
posted by I_Love_Bananas at 4:14 AM on September 21, 2019 [2 favorites]


Jason Smith Hashtag Jones.

Somebody's going to do it.
posted by Kirth Gerson at 4:18 AM on September 21, 2019 [1 favorite]


The one I find most puzzling there is "Cave-Browne-Cave". Why do they need two Caves?

There were some other names lost, of course. The Caves from Lower Bromley used to be The Cheswick Caves. But The Caves from over East Piddlepatch were The Grenville Caves.

Over time each became The Caves as we all know which Cave we are referring to.

The Caves or The Caves

Quite simple really.
posted by affectionateborg at 4:36 AM on September 21, 2019 [2 favorites]


If I were one of the Caves, I would search high and low for a spouse with the surname "Nick."
posted by taz at 4:44 AM on September 21, 2019 [2 favorites]


We need some sort of Jon-Bois-shaped batsignal for moments like this.
posted by mhoye at 5:36 AM on September 21, 2019 [1 favorite]


Jean-Luc Grand-Pierre, now there’s a name I haven’t heard in a while. #cbj
posted by kevinbelt at 5:47 AM on September 21, 2019


If I were one of the Caves, I would search high and low for a spouse with the surname "Nick."

Announcer: "Today on The Bachelorette, Diane Cave meets the new men in her life."

Bachelorette: [smiles, waves]

Announcer: "Let's welcome them all to the show. Brian Nick! Steve Mann! James Batt!"

Bachelorette: [smile freezes, eyes narrow]

Announcer: "Mike Dweller, Jeremy Yinn..."

Bachelorette: [smile fades, head tilts]

Announcer: "And last but not least, Ryan Johnson."

Bachelorette: [eyes narrow, then widen in panic]
posted by mhoye at 10:34 AM on September 21, 2019 [4 favorites]


Pääjärvi-Svensson
posted by fluttering hellfire at 1:06 PM on September 21, 2019


Toronto Argonauts QB Macleod Bethel-Thompson has an epic handle but I think its biggest feature is its dope nickname: Macbeth.
posted by Sauce Trough at 3:09 PM on September 21, 2019


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