Irish Chef Makes a Classic Danish Dish
October 29, 2019 7:48 PM   Subscribe

Irish Chef Makes a Classic Danish Dish - It involves fresh fish, toast, mayo, and pickles. And the best accent that ever should exist to explain how to prepare a traditional Danish dish in the English language.
posted by Slap*Happy (22 comments total) 15 users marked this as a favorite
 
The cutting himself on camera and boiling over the brine made me identify with him more then any other youtube chef, speaking as a hominid that has several thumb scars due to dull knife blades and as an individual who just today managed to burn my hand while frying tofu. (hot oil splashes yo.) great vid.
posted by Homo neanderthalensis at 8:25 PM on October 29, 2019 [3 favorites]


It all looked very tasty except why fillet a fish without gutting it first? He was sawing back and forth through the entrails, that seems like a poor approach. But I can't fault the overall results, at least visually.
posted by Dip Flash at 9:07 PM on October 29, 2019 [1 favorite]


Why not olive oil?
posted by mr_roboto at 10:11 PM on October 29, 2019


I'm impressed that there are so many flavors going on in what looks like a simple sandwich. I'm not a big fan of fish but that looks amazing.
posted by zardoz at 11:08 PM on October 29, 2019 [1 favorite]


DIRTY
posted by i_am_joe's_spleen at 1:38 AM on October 30, 2019 [5 favorites]


This is relevant to my interests!

Smørrebrød is the classic Danish lunch food, and I was invited to have some on my first week back. They are good, but basically it's a sandwich, and who doesn't like sandwiches. The main debate is, one slice of bread with add-ons (open), or two slices with stuff in between (Earl of).
posted by growabrain at 1:52 AM on October 30, 2019 [1 favorite]


Irish Chef Makes a Classic Danish Dish ... in Norway!
posted by chavenet at 3:19 AM on October 30, 2019 [4 favorites]


Has this gentleman never eaten anything from the US Gulf Coast? Remoulade is unique to Denmark, indeed!
posted by hwestiii at 4:42 AM on October 30, 2019 [2 favorites]


Just a note on the accent: accents don't make us magic. To us, you're the one with the accent.
posted by scruss at 4:48 AM on October 30, 2019 [5 favorites]


This guy could be the new Jamie Oliver. That was really entertaining.
posted by sevenyearlurk at 4:58 AM on October 30, 2019


Has this gentleman never eaten anything from the US Gulf Coast? Remoulade is unique to Denmark, indeed!

From everything I can dig up online, the US remoulade is substantially different to the Danish variety (as is the French rémoulade) to the point where I'd call them distinct and different things.

(I haven't eaten the US version though I am very familiar with the other two)
posted by Dysk at 5:55 AM on October 30, 2019 [1 favorite]


den var genialt! and he's right, john's outside the copenhagen central station is quite good
posted by alchemist at 6:01 AM on October 30, 2019 [1 favorite]


Remoulade is a catch-all culinary term for "mayo with tangy stuff in it" - it's one of the classic French sauces, so everyone butchers it for their own ends. Oyster po'boy dressing, with cayenne and Dijon and finely diced sweet-pickle okra in the hoity-toity parts of Nawlins? Remoulade. Oyster po'boy dressing with ketchup, mustard, relish and tobasco from a mid-city gas station? Remoulade. Mac Sauce on the Big Mac? Remoulade. The revered and traditional Danish sauce with a French name? Remoulade. Escoffier rolling over in his grave? Keep rolling. Some joints in the US call it the "Comeback Sauce" and others, "Thousand Island Dressing."

It is straight up food magic in all its incarnations.
posted by Slap*Happy at 6:07 AM on October 30, 2019 [6 favorites]


(Also, Alton Brown has a recipe using silken tofu instead of mayo. Wow, it's good.)
posted by Slap*Happy at 6:09 AM on October 30, 2019


Why not olive oil?

I assume because he's going for a neutral taste as rapeseed (AKA Canola) has a neutral taste while olive oil does not.
posted by Ashwagandha at 6:54 AM on October 30, 2019 [2 favorites]


It's interesting because it's not traditional but still 100% within the frame. I'd eat it. (Once my aunt bought a whole box of mackerel by accident, I ate seven. I love mackerel).
growabrain, we need to have some smørrebrød soon. I've had some eventful months, but things are cooling down.
posted by mumimor at 7:44 AM on October 30, 2019 [1 favorite]


It's delightful, and he's delightful. GOOD knife skills, even with the finger slicing.

And for all those Irish folk on the blue, can you explain why some Irish accents turn 'things' into 'tings' and others don't? The brogues seem quite variant to this ignorant Canuck...
posted by jrochest at 9:10 AM on October 30, 2019


Mackerel is the best fish YES. I, too, am puzzled by the gut sawing whilst filleting; the point of gutting is to remove any harmful bacteria residing in the guts (which is why you carefully don't cut them open) so as not to contaminate the flesh. But then again, he's using those fillets right away, not saving them for later sale. Some cat got lucky, I hope.
But now my morning coffee isn't doing it for me and I'm thinking about heading to the fish market.
posted by twentyfeetof tacos at 10:18 AM on October 30, 2019


Just a note on the accent: accents don't make us magic. To us, you're the one with the accent.

Brb, booking a flight to Ireland so I can cast spells on my enemies in Canada.
posted by rodlymight at 5:10 PM on October 30, 2019 [1 favorite]


DIRTY
I want to say I am down with absolutely anything in life Haleigh describes this way.

And for all those Irish folk on the blue, can you explain why some Irish accents turn 'things' into 'tings' and others don't
I'm not Irish - so pinch of salt - but my perception is that people in Northern Ireland say "th" and those in the Irish Republic say "t". And that probably has routes on coming from a population which had Irish as a first language from one which originally spoke English or Scots.
posted by rongorongo at 2:02 AM on October 31, 2019


This recipe is so up my street, but I'm the only one in my family who would eat it as prepared.
But using ingredients easier for me to source.

-Mackrel -> smoked salmon
-Real mayo -> crap mayo and maybe decent butter
-Rye bread -> brown soda bread
I think I'm going to make a batch of that dark ale pickle this weekend. And I'm going to receive complaints because of the smell and it's mightn't work with the salmon.


Oh no, derail! #derail
As a Dub, who went to speech and drama classes, the dropping of the h depends on whether or not you learned the Irish RP (which carries with it similar connotations to British received pronunciation).

A favourite example of the Irish RP is Chaim Herzog, who grew up in Dublin.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQmexk4-aEY
And Gay Byrne also,...
posted by Homemade Interossiter at 3:56 AM on October 31, 2019 [1 favorite]


No no, you can't use smoked salmon for this. That's another thing.
A Dane would have smoked salmon on franskbrød (white wheat bread) or surbrød (a mix of rye and wheat with caraway seeds), with a lot of good butter. Toppings can be dill, freshly ground pepper and a few drops of lemon juice. Or you can have it with scrambled eggs and asparagus. Mayo is seen as vulgar with salmon in the smørrebrød tradition, though I've seen dill mayo and mayo-based crab/shrimp salads.
The smørrebrød people have lots of rules, though they are a bit looser now. Back in the day before mass tourism, they had schools where foreigners could learn to eat, because the smørrebrød ladies* found it so disgusting when people ate it in the wrong way, like eating salami before the herring, or food that is supposed to be on rye on wheat bread.

*Fun fact: in Danish, a smørrebrød lady is a smørrebrødsjomfru, a smørrebrød virgin. I don't know why, but I think jomfru was used for all unmarried women at some time, which it isn't today, except in the context of smørrebrød.
posted by mumimor at 12:56 PM on October 31, 2019 [2 favorites]


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