66% turnout and a landslide victory for the Democrats
April 16, 2020 8:10 AM   Subscribe

 



An explanation of the left-right divide in South Korea.


That is an AWESOME link. Thankyou!
posted by lalochezia at 9:15 AM on April 16 [9 favorites]


Maybe in countries where 35% of the population isn't soaked in a propaganda landscape run by the rentier class that glorifies their audience's cruelty and violent stupidity.
I would like to point out, even though this comment was deleted for being off-the-wall ridiculous and ignorant... for those of you unaware of how South Korean media skews, that the three largest news papers in the country, Chosun Ilbo, Dong-A Ilbo, and Joong-Ang Ilbo, are all conservative in nature, and savaged MOON Jae-In over COVID early on, and even before that about his Justice Minister CHO Kuk over corruption charges, and are now very much in the spirit of "the Democratic party MUST work with the opposition!" There's even a term to refer to the three, because of the impression that they collude with each other: Chojoongdong. The majority of the remaining newspapers tend to be business papers, and... conservative.

Two of those three run cable news channels (TV CHOSUN, Channel A) which are also right-wing. You have a lot of Christian news outlets that are also... conservative.

And you have rabidly right-wing websites like Munhwa ("Culture"), Ilbe (think reddit/4chan).

There are plenty of centrist news sources, such as KBS (public broadcasting), Yonhap/YTN, SBS, MBC, and JTBC, and some leftist ones like Hankyoreh and Ohmynews, sure.

But to pretend that 35% of the population isn't soaked in propaganda? To wit, former president PARK Geun-Hye, who was the daughter of former dictator PARK Chung-Hee, had quite some popularity in the run up to her election in 2013, and regularly had approval ratings above 50% until her disastrous handlings of the Sewol ferry disaster and the 2015 MERS outbreak led to the revelation of her not being all there (and her subsequent impeachment).

Additionally, even though it's a landslide victory, South Korea uses a first-past-the-post system for the vast majority of the assembly seats, meaning that the vote totals for this election between the center-left Democratic Party and the right-wing United Future Party was only about 2m people.
posted by anem0ne at 9:16 AM on April 16 [21 favorites]


Yeah. The Democrats won around 80 seats more than the UFP—enough for those special fast-track powers—but they actually secured 0.5pp fewer votes. FPTP is a helluva drug.
posted by Panthalassa at 9:28 AM on April 16


OH!

And I even forgot to mention that in 2013 South Korea's National Intelligence Service helped sway elections in favor of conservative candidates.

So, like. "35% of the population isn't soaked in a propaganda landscape"? My dude, that ain't South Korea.
posted by anem0ne at 9:30 AM on April 16 [7 favorites]


Thanks anem0ne for the additional information. It's really informative. Currently I'm just jealous!
posted by toastyk at 9:32 AM on April 16 [1 favorite]


It sounds to my admittedly uninformed perspective like the party in power is being rewarded for their competent leadership during an unprecedented crisis more than anything else.
posted by tobascodagama at 10:32 AM on April 16


further context from ask a korean

MOON Jae-In in 2017 was very William Clintonesque when it came to LGBT equality. The Democrats are, like in the US, considered more or less center-left.
posted by anem0ne at 10:46 AM on April 16 [3 favorites]


SBS (Seoul Broadcasting System) has a reputation for their election graphics, some of which were linked to in the post.

For the 2018 mayoral & gubernatorial election results, SBS parodied Produce 101, an idol competition show in which 'national producers' (the viewers) voted for the final 11 idol group members from a pool of 101 contestants. And those are the actual candidates making hand gestures popularized by P101 contestants, not CG, except for one candidate who refused to take part and so CG had to be used for them.

GoT-themed 2017 Presidential Election graphics

Harry Potter-themed 2018 Local Election predictions
posted by needled at 11:02 AM on April 16 [2 favorites]


Looking at the 8 seats the conservatives won out of the 49 seats in Seoul, not surprisingly they are in Gangnam, Seocho, Songpa and Yongsan districts, which are the wealthiest districts in Seoul. Gangnam, Seocho, and Songpa are typically referred to as comprising the Gangnam area.
posted by needled at 11:16 AM on April 16 [1 favorite]


Yeah. The Democrats won around 80 seats more than the UFP—enough for those special fast-track powers—but they actually secured 0.5pp fewer votes. FPTP is a helluva drug.

Wait, can you explain this more? The only place I've seen vote totals in a (very superficial) search is wikipedia, which should the Democrats +8% on the "constituency vote" but -0.4% on the "party list vote." Don't know how interpret this or your observation.
posted by mark k at 3:27 PM on April 16


Ah, my bad! When I last checked Wikipedia, it was showing only the party list vote totals in the 'Popular Vote' section of that summary table at the top. I failed to verify the figures properly. I even checked MBC but must have misread something.

(It is still interesting nevertheless that there is such a massive discrepancy between the way people voted in their FPTP single member constituencies versus in the proportionally represented parallel voting system. I hope someone writes a paper on it.)
posted by Panthalassa at 4:17 PM on April 16


Looking at the 8 seats the conservatives won out of the 49 seats in Seoul, not surprisingly they are in Gangnam, Seocho, Songpa and Yongsan districts, which are the wealthiest districts in Seoul. Gangnam, Seocho, and Songpa are typically referred to as comprising the Gangnam area.

One might almost say that area has a kind of mode... a certain élan, brio or esprit if you will.
posted by leibniz at 4:17 PM on April 16 [5 favorites]


Seoul is to set a 2050 net zero emissions goal.
That's going to be especially difficult (senselessly difficult) while Moon tries to phase out carbon free nuclear power.
posted by Popular Ethics at 8:19 PM on April 16


Why senselessly? Nuclear power has been a loser, a polluter, and cost ineffective for decades now.

The vulnerability and risk of my local reactor was used to convince my local utility that they needed to build more fracked gas power to compensate for the liabilities of the nuclear plant. That does not seem part of the solution to me, that I pay for the nuclear reactor, and then have to pay again for its deficiencies.
posted by eustatic at 4:06 AM on April 17


Part of me is not surprised, but still saddened by the regional divide shown by this map.
posted by needled at 7:09 AM on April 17 [1 favorite]


It could happen here
posted by anem0ne at 8:02 PM on April 17


Re: the map needled is referring to, that regionalism is strong as ever. The red would be the conservatives, and the gyeongsang region in the southeast would be where three of the four dictators hail from, and four of the six presidents are from, with two of them being conservative.
posted by anem0ne at 8:10 PM on April 17 [1 favorite]


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