11-year-old Brazilian lands 1080 on standard vert ramp
May 14, 2020 12:12 PM   Subscribe

Shakespeare may have written King Lear while under quarantine, but Gui Khury did even better than the Bard during his coronavirus pandemic school closure, pulling off the first-ever 1080 (three revolutions) on a standard vertical skateboard ramp.
posted by Etrigan (29 comments total) 12 users marked this as a favorite
 
Way to stick the landing!
posted by cmfletcher at 12:24 PM on May 14 [1 favorite]


The youtubification of the skilled sports creates crazy results. My kids freeski and snowboard -- 13-year-olds routinely do tricks that little over a decade ago would have won them Olympic medals.
posted by zeikka at 12:26 PM on May 14 [17 favorites]


Sick!
posted by Fizz at 12:32 PM on May 14


Tired: Tony Hawk Pro Skater
Wired: Gui Khury Amateur Skater
posted by tobascodagama at 1:20 PM on May 14 [5 favorites]


Tired: poring over tattered copies of Thrasher Magazine and emulating moves depicted by grainy sequence photos.
Wired: near-real-time GoPro footage and YouTube videos of someone doing some amazing skill that you would like to learn.
Next: AR '1080 experiences' for us, the COVID-couch dwellers?
posted by FairWitness at 1:30 PM on May 14 [3 favorites]


Awesome!
posted by Secretariat at 1:33 PM on May 14


There's also something to be said for the comparative ease of spinning a much smaller child-size body in the air compared to an adult. I've submitted a grant request for a study involving my children, but alas, my basement is still without a foam-block pit.
posted by onehalfjunco at 1:47 PM on May 14 [8 favorites]


Does anybody have a link to the video ? The EU version of the USA Today site doesn't provide a link to the video.
posted by Pendragon at 1:48 PM on May 14


Pendragon: "Does anybody have a link to the video ? The EU version of the USA Today site doesn't provide a link to the video."

Here's his Instagram with the videos.
posted by octothorpe at 1:59 PM on May 14 [4 favorites]


There's also something to be said for the comparative ease of spinning a much smaller child-size body in the air compared to an adult.

It's also a cab 1080.
posted by lawrencium at 2:02 PM on May 14 [1 favorite]


It also helps to have knees like a boneless chicken.
posted by chavenet at 2:18 PM on May 14 [3 favorites]


It's also a cab 1080.

What does this mean? That he starts fakie?
posted by Expecto Cilantro at 2:32 PM on May 14


Out vile 900! Where is thy luster now?
posted by gwint at 2:34 PM on May 14


Next: AR '1080 experiences' for us, the COVID-couch dwellers?

Well, you could put on socks, stand in your kitchen and whirl around 3 times before violently slamming yourself on to the kitchen floor a hundred times in a row, and then whirl around 3 times and then slide towards your counter and stop. That's gotta be pretty close.
posted by BigHeartedGuy at 2:47 PM on May 14 [6 favorites]


Tony Hawk's Pro Skater 1 & 2 are being remastered and rereleased in September and here's Goldfinger's "Quarantine Cover" of Superman too so basically this is all good.
posted by mhoye at 2:50 PM on May 14 [2 favorites]


Holy crap. And here I get excited when my 11 year old puts all his clothes into the laundry basket
posted by Mchelly at 3:16 PM on May 14 [14 favorites]


And the linked article was published on Mr. Hawk's birthday!
posted by TedW at 3:35 PM on May 14


The youtubification of the skilled sports creates crazy results. My kids freeski and snowboard -- 13-year-olds routinely do tricks that little over a decade ago would have won them Olympic medals.

On that subject I can recommend this book: The Rise of Superman
posted by mce at 3:48 PM on May 14 [1 favorite]


And NoFX plays on.

Skateboarding. Skateboarding never changes.
posted by glonous keming at 3:48 PM on May 14 [8 favorites]


Spin derail, I've read the tiny russian skaters that are able to do quads are essentially abandoned as soon as they start to grow even a bit. Size matters (in physics).

But way cool for a kid to do something that amazing, I bike past the local park and imagine wearing a bubble wrap suit to try even a bit of ramp skating.
posted by sammyo at 4:10 PM on May 14 [1 favorite]


Yeah, the NoFX jumped out at me and made me smile.

Then, the last line made me think wtf?! The theoretical Olympics have skateboarding, but no half pipe event?!
posted by Ghidorah at 4:10 PM on May 14 [1 favorite]


Yeah, I'd like to see an infinite number of monkeys pull that one off....
posted by OHenryPacey at 5:09 PM on May 14 [2 favorites]


11-year-old Brazilian lands 1080 on standard vert ramp
tiny russian skaters that are able to do quads are essentially abandoned as soon as they start to grow even a bit

I am enjoying the concept of these outstanding world-class athletic feats of peak training and skill that can only be achieved by children. I feel like this could be a good way to select giant robot pilots when circumstances require children in that role.
posted by save alive nothing that breatheth at 5:24 PM on May 14 [9 favorites]


sammyo: Spin derail, I've read the tiny russian skaters that are able to do quads are essentially abandoned as soon as they start to grow even a bit. Size matters (in physics).

When I was thinking about human-powered flight, the physics and physiology of it all made me wonder whether a child might make the best possible pilot. Ethics, though, and all that...
posted by clawsoon at 6:01 PM on May 14


I can do that. But I choose not to.
posted by dances_with_sneetches at 6:54 PM on May 14 [1 favorite]


> What does this mean? That he starts fakie?

Yeah, which is an important distinction. I mean, not to take *anything* away from the kid landing it, because that's incredible, but to miss an important detail removes a lot of the context - With a cab you can wind up your body more, so you essentially get the first 180 for free, can carry a lot more momentum, and you ride out normal. Skaters are sticklers for terminology for these reasons.

All of these factors are the reason a regular 1080 to fakie is unlikely to ever happen. IIRC Lasek landed a regular 720 to fakie in The End - a film that was originally going to be called The 900 because they built a dedicated vert ramp for Hawk to land the 900, but he couldn't because the size of the ramp threw off his technique. Bear in mind Hawk had been riding vert ramps for over two decades by that point.

I'm also a bit surprised to see vert skating won't be in the olympics. It's more like, say, figure skating, in that unless you grow up doing it then you'll never be good at it. At least not to an "olympic level", whatever that means. You need to develop the technique and never have the fear. Most skaters can drop in on a vert ramp if they comit to it, and yeah the few that ride smaller ramps can do some basic lip tricks. Getting above the coping though, the stuff you see here, that's god like.
posted by lawrencium at 11:43 PM on May 14 [4 favorites]


You need to develop the technique and never have the fear.

I don't know anything about skateboarding, but observing my own kids and their peers working on freeski tricks I can say for certain that there is always substantial fear. The sport is about progression, adding small elements at a time, and managing/ overcoming the fear. Any video clip where kids do something amazing is a result of sustained work, and most likely physical and emotional hurt (hopefully overcome by the kids through their own motivation rather than pushy parents, etc.).

Other parents around skiing and snowboarding share similar sentiments, and many of us hate the complimentary comments that disqualify the kids' accomplishments by stating that kids feel no fear. They feel plenty of fear, but do these things anyways. Parents feel scared, elated, hopeful, proud, etc. as well, but we certainly know that the kids are not idiots who don't feel fear.
posted by zeikka at 7:08 AM on May 15 [4 favorites]


The thing about skateboarding is you usually have an out, that is to say you can bail a trick much later into it. This applies to park/street/vert. A lot of the tricks you see can take hundreds of failed attempts to land but most of the failures are more controlled. I think this reduces the fear factor significantly.

With snowboarding/skiing you are generally going a lot faster, higher, and your outs are much more limited - being attached to the snowboard means you are committed much sooner. So the fear is probably knowing that it's all (landing) or nothing (pain). If you don't get your rotation right there's no way for you safely kick your board away and knee slide out of the attempt.

My impression from following the local ski club for a few seasons for a photo project is that the really good kids didn't appear to have any fear. This was occasionally a bad thing that led to accidents.

I do agree. I don't think I ever had any fear when I was still skateboarding, although I was never that good and I wasn't throwing myself down things. I do have fear now and then when snowboarding, although that tends to be those situations where I'm atop a precipice and my outs are limited. I stay away from the park since I don't heal that quickly anymore.
posted by lawrencium at 8:31 AM on May 15 [1 favorite]


My impression from following the local ski club for a few seasons for a photo project is that the really good kids didn't appear to have any fear.

I would say the total opposite. The really good ones get over it, but as you get to know the kids (not only my own) it's easier to see where they are in the emotional scale. I'd say that every single one of them experiences fear.
posted by zeikka at 10:33 AM on May 15


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