Bread Making
August 11, 2020 9:54 PM   Subscribe

 
We get Shokupan from a Japanese-American? woman at our local farmers market here in Seattle, (along with her awesome Apricot and Plum jams). It's some good stuff.
posted by Windopaene at 10:41 PM on August 11


This is very restful to watch.

Shokupan is one of the breads I learned to bake while in COVID lockdown, because I'm a middle class hipster cliche.

It's so soft and springy and delicious, and it's less effort than a cob loaf (if you have a stand mixer). Here's the recipe I use.
posted by His thoughts were red thoughts at 10:55 PM on August 11 [6 favorites]


His thoughts were red thoughts inspired me with that recipe! It's become the house bread during the pandemic and alternates with sourdough. Can I join your cliche club?

I love my pillowy loaves. My friends now call them sofa loaf. I'm looking forward to watching this video after dinner.
posted by lemon_icing at 12:01 AM on August 12 [2 favorites]


Well, that's tomorrow sorted then. ;)
posted by SecretAgentSockpuppet at 12:31 AM on August 12 [1 favorite]


Mesmerizing, though the interior of the walnut one looked raw. Paul Hollywood would not be pleased.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI at 4:22 AM on August 12


It made it even more enjoyable for me to imagine that this was a video about how to sea lards are created.
posted by gwint at 5:42 AM on August 12


Paul Hollywood would not be pleased.

I once watched Paul Hollywood demand that bake-off contestants, two of whom were Indian, make naan by using baking power and grilling it in an oven. So I will decline to accept his opinion on breads that are not, ahem, ‘white’ bread.
posted by His thoughts were red thoughts at 6:26 AM on August 12 [5 favorites]


Eight bucks seems like a lot for a loaf of bread? And I was surprised the small loaves were only $2 given there's more manual labour involved in them than the big ones. Cost of materials is just not very high for bread?

The scene with the scales jumping around on the counter infuriated me. In a hot second I'd have fastened those down onto a heavy sanitizable tray so the dough sizing process wouldn't be so dang fraught with tool management.
posted by seanmpuckett at 7:02 AM on August 12 [2 favorites]


It was taller by haaaaalf than the ooooold man himself.
posted by Iteki at 8:34 AM on August 12 [4 favorites]


That was so relaxing. I was kind of hoping to spot an overly-browned bun because of my love for Kogepan, but all of the breads were perfect
posted by evidenceofabsence at 1:16 PM on August 12


> Mesmerizing, though the interior of the walnut one looked raw. Paul Hollywood would not be pleased.

I was wondering if the oil from the walnuts prevented the dough from rising well.

> Eight bucks seems like a lot for a loaf of bread? And I was surprised the small loaves were only $2 given there's more manual labour involved in them than the big ones. Cost of materials is just not very high for bread?

Wheat's more expensive in Japan, and I am wondering whether this one is following the artisanal trend of grinding their own flour on-site. Which all means more expensive equipment and more labor cost.

For a while over the winter Youtube was recommending me a lot of documentary footage about German bakeries. For some reason. That plus a night I once spent at a Holiday Inn has made me an expert. But it turns out to be pretty relaxing to watch, so I got a good look at how small-scale mass production is done, and for the most part everyboy in Germany has pretty similar equipment and processes. By contrast, the Japanese bakery in this FPP seemed to me to be investing a lot more human labor into the loaves, even with the impressively fleet way the bakers were cutting the dough and prepping the pans. The German bakeries had a few machines that would do all the kneading, portioning, and rolling, while this Japanese bakery put a lot of that work in human hands instead, and filling and emptying the bread trays also requires more labor than the actually-kinda-amazing conveyor-belt-like contraption that western bakeries have that allows one person to move a dozen loaves into and out of the oven nigh-simultaneously.

Basic grocery store bread these days is $3-5 for a full-sized loaf of roughly 20 oz. By contrast, white bread from Japanese and Korean bakeries in the US are about on par with the artisanal European-style bakeries here ($6-9). I'm sure one or the other type of small bakery is operating with better margins, but pricewise they're all in the ballpark of each other.
posted by ardgedee at 4:47 PM on August 12 [1 favorite]


Amazingly laid-back mass of dough. I like how the baker gives it a few reassuring pats before slicing it into smaller loafs.
posted by dmh at 2:38 AM on August 13


I really want to taste the bread with polyp roe in it.
posted by Going To Maine at 10:38 PM on August 14


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