r/AskHistorians conference this week
September 14, 2020 3:19 PM   Subscribe

Tomorrow, September 15, The AskHistorians public history forum is hosting their first-ever conference as an online event open to all. The theme, “Business as Unusual”, reflects how human history is filled with examples of people struggling to make do under difficult and quickly changing circumstances. It also describes the conference itself: digital in origin, unrestricted, and open to anyone around the world with a passion for history."

The conference is spread across three days, with sixteen events. There are keynote presentations, networking sessions hosted on the Remo platform, and panel Q&A hosted on r/AskHistorians.

The sessions include:
- Panel Q&A: Indigenous histories disrupting yours
- Keynote: The Atomic Bomb and Visions of a New Post World Order
- Panel Q&A: How I learned to stop worrying and love the apocalypse
- Panel Q&A: Pick your poison
- Panel Q&A: Sinners, Saints, and Spies
- Panel Q&A: Power and Projections of Trauma in the 19th and 20th Centuries
- Panel Q&A: Being the change others don't want
- Panel Q&A: In whose trenches? Violence, voice, and the experience of a war from below

You can see the conference program here
posted by rebent (5 comments total) 14 users marked this as a favorite
 
I subscribe to that subreddit but haven't had time to check in lately. This sounds very interesting! Thanks for posting this!
posted by pointystick at 3:32 PM on September 14, 2020 [1 favorite]


Looking forward to this!

For other historical perspectives on the year of unusual, I recommend:
Joanne Freeman's ongoing "History Matters" posts at National Council for Education Channel
Townsends covering the Smallpox mitigations by the American revolutionary army
posted by SoundInhabitant at 3:54 PM on September 14, 2020


For anyone unfamiliar with AskHistorians, here's the latest digest of questions with interesting answers. That's just from the last week.
posted by A Thousand Baited Hooks at 5:12 PM on September 14, 2020


-deleted-
posted by ovvl at 6:09 PM on September 14, 2020 [9 favorites]


For other historical perspectives on the year of unusual, I recommend:
Joanne Freeman's ongoing "History Matters" posts at National Council for Education Channel
Townsends covering the Smallpox mitigations by the American revolutionary army


Another book for this pile: A Paradise Built In Hell by Rebecca Solnit. I'm reading it now for my book club; the blurb will tell you it's about the grass-roots communities that pop up immediately following disasters, where people will band together and try taking care of each other in the interim before the "People In Charge" get there, and how often the survivors actually get weirdly fond of what life was like in that brief time. But then she does a deeper dive into how that may be because a disaster is a disruption in the current societal order - and maybe that disruption was a good thing.

It was really interesting to read that whole chapter about "why do the people in charge think that the masses would panic in a disaster aftermath" recently, I'll tell you what.
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 6:41 PM on September 14, 2020 [4 favorites]


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