"Thank you for looking for me"
May 13, 2022 7:14 PM   Subscribe

Last February, Polygon published an article about the Video Game History Foundation's search for the creator of an Atari 2600 game, "Wabbit". Now, their search has come to fruition.

A pretty obscure title from a pretty obscure publisher (Games by Apollo, later known just as Apollo), "Wabbit" has the distinction of being the first home console video game with a playable human female protagonist.

After Apollo folded, the programmer, Van Tran, moved over to MicroGraphic Image, a company founded by other former Apollo workers, where she would go on to write an (eventually unreleased) Atari 5200 conversion of Solar Fox.
posted by hanov3r (6 comments total) 43 users marked this as a favorite
 
This grateful Gen-Xer thanks you for sharing — vintage computing / video game histories are my jam :)
posted by retronic at 7:40 PM on May 13 [2 favorites]


Wow, what a charming story and delightful profile. Thanks so much for posting!
posted by hippybear at 7:54 PM on May 13 [1 favorite]


What a wonderful story! I love how proud she is of her work and her unique accomplishments. Also she went on to get a CS degree and is still working in software. Not bad for someone who dropped out of high school because of a language barrier!

(I just came back from Houston excited about Viet-Cajun food. I'd love to read a book about the experiences of Vietnamese immigrants after the war, particularly those who settled around the Gulf Coast.)
posted by Nelson at 6:32 AM on May 14 [4 favorites]


computing / video game histories are my jam :)

I urge anyone who loves this kind of story to check out the Preserving Worlds series on YouTube or on Means.Tv if you have a subscription. Great stories about old games and the communities that still care about them.
posted by signsofrain at 2:34 PM on May 14 [3 favorites]


There is SO MUCH of this stuff going on right now. I've watched multiple documentaries about such things, some of them very lengthy. I find them fascinating. Do I need to start a series of posts about this kind of thing? I'd just been letting them slide by unless they were something I felt were truly notable.
posted by hippybear at 2:40 PM on May 14 [2 favorites]


I'd love to read a book about the experiences of Vietnamese immigrants after the war, particularly those who settled around the Gulf Coast.)

I don't know of books, but look up VAYLA and Boat People SOS, , and there was also a documentary about the community's fight agaInst an emergency landfill in new orleans east after Katrina.

There are a couple of Vietnamese American social science scholars at UNO who may be worth reading.

There are also Hmong people (Hmong Americans? I dunno) in and among the Vietnamese American communities.
posted by eustatic at 4:24 PM on May 14 [2 favorites]


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