Borf is a dork.
July 15, 2005 1:14 AM   Subscribe

Borf is dead. The masked mystery whose ubiquitious graffiti has confused Washington for months is revealed to be an 18-year-old anarchist. He had a good run, though, getting his work on dozens of locations in D.C., then going on tour through Raleigh, New York and San Francisco, inspiring an internet following in the process. And while his work wasn't brilliant enough to match the romantic counterculture image he tried to create, there's a truly sad story behind his pseudonym and icon: both belong to a friend who committed suicide two years ago. Of course, that's unlikely to arouse the sympathy of the various city officials spending (I would assume) hundreds of thousands of dollars to remove his work.
posted by gsteff (62 comments total)
 
Eyewitness news made a boo boo.
posted by Citizen Premier at 1:25 AM on July 15, 2005


I hope that Satan has the penile fitness to get the thorny 30-incher up for this guy, too. Graffiti writers are the most pretentious kids around-- "I'm enlightening the populus! You object? It's because you can't possibly understand!"

If the authorities killed a couple, it might send a message.
posted by Mayor Curley at 3:43 AM on July 15, 2005


The message being - adolescence is now a capital crime.
posted by the cuban at 3:59 AM on July 15, 2005


...because as we all know, destroying public property is part and parcel of being an adolescent. Oh those crazy kids...
posted by dsquid at 4:15 AM on July 15, 2005


I just adore the concept that spraypainting a pattern on public property somehow "destroys" it.

Taking a sledgehammer to it, on the other hand.
posted by Josh Zhixel at 4:27 AM on July 15, 2005


I just adore the concept that spraypainting a pattern on public property somehow "destroys" it.

Yes, it's hyperbole. But it costs money. And it's a ridiculous undertaking often perpetrated by frustrated wannabe artists who think that they have a mind-blowing message that needs to be seen.

Here in Boston, we had an individual or a group that was big on painting the jersey barriers laid down for the Big Dig. And that was neat-- the barriers were stark and a little imposing and they weren't permanent structures. I liked spotting a new piece on my way to work.

But some little douchebag who thinks he'll blow my mind because he painted his trite anti-war message on a clean, permanent brick wall? He needs to be incarcerated to mellow his raging megalomania. Otherwise he'll graduate from art school and start doing performance art or some shit. And then we'll have to read a review about his shows where he slaps meat on his head to make a statement about consumerism. The only people who want art student defacement to continue are the makers of black clothes and the importers of foreign cigarettes.
posted by Mayor Curley at 4:47 AM on July 15, 2005


I just adore the concept that spraypainting a pattern on public property somehow "destroys" it.

Spraying oil paint "tags" on a traffic sign, which Borf has done many times, effectively destroys it.

Maybe he should use water based paints.
posted by dsquid at 4:53 AM on July 15, 2005


Meh. He's no Cool "Disco" Dan.
posted by Alt F4 at 4:58 AM on July 15, 2005


It says in the article he's from Great Falls. This is perhaps the wealthiest neighborhood in the area. Does that change anyone's perspective on him?
posted by poppo at 4:59 AM on July 15, 2005


He complained that folks in stores assume "all young people shoplift," and when he's reminded that he himself shoplifts spray paint, he says that's just more evidence of how messed up society is.

uhm... is the reporter in on the joke, or just totally confused by the apparent stupidity of the Borf? I can't tell. If she actually fell for it, then perhaps the she's part of that demographic for whom word of Borf really is a mind-blowing message that needs to be seen.
posted by sfenders at 5:01 AM on July 15, 2005


Yes, it's hyperbole. But it costs money.

It only costs money because people insist on removing it. If Picasso was painting murals in the middle of the night on city walls, removing that would surely cost money as well.
posted by VulcanMike at 5:10 AM on July 15, 2005


Alt F4 writes "Meh. He's no Cool 'Disco' Dan."

That's exactly what I was going to write. Cool "Disco" Dan. I'm afraid that dates us.
posted by OmieWise at 5:33 AM on July 15, 2005


Yes, it's hyperbole. But it costs money.

It only costs money because people insist on removing it. If Picasso was painting murals in the middle of the night on city walls, removing that would surely cost money as well.
posted by VulcanMike at 8:10 AM EST on July 15 [!]


And it only costs money when I replace my stolen television set...
Don't touch other people's property, picasso or not.
posted by jikel_morten at 6:26 AM on July 15, 2005


It only costs money because people insist on removing it.

Do you really want to live in a world where some vain little rich kid has written his simplistic aphorisms on every available surface?
posted by Mayor Curley at 6:28 AM on July 15, 2005


post no bills
posted by phirleh at 6:28 AM on July 15, 2005


Oh noes! Curley doesn't like ART STUDENTS!
"I was here, but I disappear." And good on him for Situationism. Get that man Lipstick Traces.
posted by klangklangston at 6:46 AM on July 15, 2005


Do you really want to live in a world where some vain little rich kid has written his simplistic aphorisms on every available surface?

Have you been to Times Square? ;)
posted by XQUZYPHYR at 6:47 AM on July 15, 2005


Borf did stencils and wrote "Borf" with a sharpy in a childish hand on everything from Metro cars to trash cans, wow. There are far more talented taggers in this town, I'm really disappointed that this guy gets the attention. I am not disappointed that he got caught.

Meh. He's no Cool "Disco" Dan.

Exactly. By the way, Disco Dan still tags along the Red Line in NE, either that or somebody is giving his old pieces touch ups out of respect from time to time. I don't think you are going to find many Borf touch ups.
posted by Pollomacho at 6:47 AM on July 15, 2005


This was on DC.Craigslist, and I'm reposting it here because it'll be gone in a few weeks but it echoes my own thoughts so well.

I usually just lurk, enjoying the (mostly) pointless banter while wasting time at work. However, this post really annoyed me. Borf-or whatever his name was, deserves nothing more than 30 days in jail and a $1000 fine for VANDALISM.

Plain and simple. That the Washington Post would devote a ream of column inches to VANDAL takes my breath away. Please-"Borf" defenders (devotees?), let's look at the facts here: a) he's a semi-talented 18 yo graffito "artiste" who, instead of climbing up street signs, should be hunkered over a sketch pad working on his technique (which is not very good). b) he claims to be some sort of "anarchist", yet he hails from that hot-bed of class warfare, Falls Church and c) he gives a BAD NAME to the SERIOUS artists in this town who all work very hard for ANY type of recognition.

Let's look at each point-his technique. It's not very original, sorta a cross between Andy Warhol and the sort of Agit-Prop that was popular, oh, say, 25 years ago or so. His only really novel idea was to climb up onto a large street direction sign and deface it (costing the taxpayers hundreds, if not 1,000's of $$ to clean up). And, unfortunately, even this was not very novel- remember "Cool Disco Dan?". This vandal was clever and daring enough to tag places that I'd think a chimp would have a hard time tackling. "Borf's" art" is not "precocious"-it's just plain BAADD. Good artists-and there are plenty in this city, spend YEARS developing their technique. His simple-minded graffito slaps these folks in the face, basically saying "hey-look at me-I'm not very good, but I make a "statement."

As for him being an "anarchist"-christ almighty. GIVE ME A FUCKING BREAK. He knows no more of "class warfare" than Paris Hilton. Due to my limited financial means, I live in a very poor, working class, majority-minority neighborhood who would (literally) DIE to live in a sumptious neighborhood like Great Falls. These people did not march on the IMF or World Bank declaring "Class Unity"- they HAD TO GO TO WORK. These people see Capitalism as a WAY OUT OF THEIR MISERY. "Borf" is nothing more than a spoiled little rich kid who has NOT A FUCKING IOTA OF A CLUE WHAT IT MEANS TO BE POOR. Screw him- nothing pisses me off more than little jerks like him trying to make a "statement about anarchy and the inequities of capitalism."
Oh-and no, I am not some right-wing sycophant. I am actually quite liberal. "Borf" would do good to c'mon by the local homeless shelter and do some volunteer time with "the masses."

Finally, and I touched upon this above, the people who valorize artists like "Borf" (and others- that dead junkie Basquiat comes to mind here), DEMEAN serious artists of all stripes. This kid has gotten more fucking press than any local artist I know of in recent months. I know PLENTY of very-talented, hard-working artists who labor in the fields and get SCANT recognition of their talents. This is a common complaint amongst the professionals in this town (full disclosure- I am one). Yet this fucked up little suburbanite VANDAL gets treated like he's the next Andy Warhol.

In closing- I think he should APOLOGIZE, PAY, and DO SOME COMMUNITY SERVICE- perhaps a battered women's shelter in SE? Or maybe, live in a run-down, shit-hole neighborhood, toil 15 hours a day for George Bush's minimum wage and see what it is to WORK FOR A FUCKING LIVING.

Thank you for allowing me to rant. You may go back to your regularly scheduled program.
posted by brownpau at 6:57 AM on July 15, 2005


Very nice brownpau, could/did not put it better myself.
posted by Pollomacho at 7:02 AM on July 15, 2005


he claims to be some sort of "anarchist"

brownpau, it seems like the guy you're quoting missed the point. "Borf" claims to be some sort of anarchist not because he thinks he is one, but to ridicule them. It's a deliberate parody of protest. If not the name, then the fact that he protests against "aging" sort of gives it away, no? Being older than 18 is to be prohibited? Remind you of any 60's movies? There is no way this guy is doing anything other than intentional parody. Yes, maybe he does "DEMEAN serious artists of all stripes" ... but only because that's exactly what he intends to do. He is only able to successfully do it because the press, the public, and people like you play along by getting all outraged at his adolescent audacity, instead of bored by his uninspired parody like you should be.
posted by sfenders at 7:21 AM on July 15, 2005


Yeah, regardless of my feelings on graffiti and stenciling, Borf really comes off as an overly idealistic adolescent. I figure in five years he's going to look back at himself and groan.
posted by Josh Zhixel at 7:33 AM on July 15, 2005


Borf isn't really all that interesting in and of himself. Most of the interest in the local press is probably driven by the sheer ubiquity of Borf's tagging. In some neighborhoods, it's just everywhere. It's a fixture of the local landscape (and yes -- mainly in upper class white neighborhoods in the city).

I'm basically indifferent to graffiti, but I'd rather hear that the authorities had caught some of the folks spray-painting "MS-13" on local property. Those are the ones that scare me.
posted by 김치 at 7:38 AM on July 15, 2005


If it's parody, it's not very good parody, and I doubt from reading the interview that he's sophisticated enough to indulge in such layered self-referential satire.

On the other hand, I was surrounded by exactly this kind of conceptual quasi-anarchist meta-nihilism in art school, and Borf is no different, having been to art school himself, so perhaps the poor parody does arise from the lack of sophistication.

The sad part is that it's all "art." The graffiti is art, the statements are art, the dubious parody is art, society's reactions are part of the art, this thread is part of the art, the debate on whether it's "art" is part of the art. I've found that this kind of indiscriminate, flailing Dadaism tends to be the refuge of those too lazy or self-involved to really explore and question the nuances of meaning, perception, and authorship -- concepts around which the movement was originally centered. Oh, I forgot: questioning the very seriousness of it? That's part of the art too.

Well, he's 18, so I guess Federal P.M.I.T.A. prison will soon be part of the art as well.
posted by brownpau at 7:48 AM on July 15, 2005


The ONLY, thing I can find that make me believe there is anything of real depth in his statements, sfenders is the Prudhomme line. He may have gotten lucky on that one, I don't give him much credit. Otherwise he's just like any other overindulged 18 year old. Spraypainting stencils that say "Grownups are obsolete" does not make you a situationist, this is not the Great Rock and Roll Swindle, its an 18 year old tagger who's read a book and used it to justify his behavior.
posted by Pollomacho at 7:55 AM on July 15, 2005


Weird! A company I work for requires a lot of survey photos, and one particularly grungy photo was just passed around to us this week.

Notice the "BORF!" graffiti.
posted by Shane at 8:28 AM on July 15, 2005


Shane, I know where that is, that's blocks from my house!

Notice the profound depth of "message" in the Borf tag.
posted by Pollomacho at 8:42 AM on July 15, 2005


I didn't mean to imply there was any depth to it. That line from Prudhomme, profound though it may be, is so widely abused that it fits in perfectly with the rest of the schtick.

this kind of indiscriminate, flailing Dadaism

I don't know, to me it seems like almost the opposite of Dadaism, though I can't explain why. It's like whatever force Dada was rebelling against has been removed, and without it the artist starts attacking his own shadow instead.
posted by sfenders at 8:43 AM on July 15, 2005


I would like to find which one of Prudhomme's works the line "Property is theft" is quoted from? Perhaps it was Fork in the Road? Seasoned America? I'd bet it was Louisiana Tastes. I'm sure his treatise on a property free existence and anarchy is tucked neatly between Mama's Jambalya and Uncle Tom's Turducken.

It's like whatever force Dada was rebelling against has been removed, and without it the artist starts attacking his own shadow instead.

Isn't that pretty much what situationism, the movement this kid claims to follow, is? The grand spoof exposes the faults of society. It was literally from this movement that Punk rock got mainstreamed. Punk as mainstream continues to be a Grand spoof on us all. Malcolm McLaren got the absolutely worst band he could find and made them Rock gods. In the most delicious irony of all, the Sex Pistols album explaining and exposing the spoof actually sold less.

So is Borf trying to accomplish a grand spoof on us all? Yeah maybe, but I wouldn't say I or too many others were terribly fooled by him (though it does look like the Raleigh news reporters were). He is pretty much who everyone expected him to be, tada! I'd say it's more like an episode of Scooby Doo than a manifesto.
posted by Pollomacho at 9:10 AM on July 15, 2005


I'd much rather look at this guy's stencils than yet another hideously sexist/racist/classist billboard selling shit that no one needs.
posted by cmonkey at 9:18 AM on July 15, 2005


Brownpau:

What I think you fail to realize is that the entire "Borf" simulacra is actually a parody of unsophisticated self-parody. It's like if Avril Lavigne finishes playing at Superbowl XXXX, then yanks off her face and OMG it's Andy Kaufman, alive after all these years. Think of it as meta-squared, or maybe even cubed.

I'm not quite sure what the message is here, but trust me, it's the most brilliant thing you'll ever read.
posted by iron chef morimoto at 9:27 AM on July 15, 2005


Prudhomme
Do you folks mean Proudhon, or has a situationist flan just hit me in the face?
posted by punilux at 9:48 AM on July 15, 2005


Perhaps it was Fork in the Road? Seasoned America?

haha... yeah, well. I thought that looked odd, but then I googled it and found a few thousand other people attributing that line to Prudhomme. Oh well.

Anyway, he doesn't come close to the sophistication of Guy Debord. I'd say this is closer to AdBusters-level cleverness.
posted by sfenders at 9:52 AM on July 15, 2005


Do you really want to live in a world where some vain little rich kid has written his simplistic aphorisms on every available surface?

If the alternative is living in a world where rich corporations cover every available surface with ads--which is what seems to be the situation--then yes, I do.
posted by dobbs at 9:57 AM on July 15, 2005


Also, I have no idea what "situationism" really is, and I have this nagging suspicion that anyone who claims that they do would be quickly denounced, excluded, and ridiculed if any situationists were around to catch them at it.
posted by sfenders at 9:58 AM on July 15, 2005


Situationism in a nutshell. Yeah, I hadn't heard of it till today either.
posted by brownpau at 10:00 AM on July 15, 2005


His "thinking" reminds me of me & my circle when I was that age. Poor kid. But I never had the get-up-and-go to run all over painting stuff, and besides I considered it a silly thing to risk getting arrested for: I'd rather have risked jail for smashing the state, not decorating it. (Now, old and tired, I just post my brilliant propaganda to the Infobahn.)

Speaking of graffiti, if anybody's ever seen some (probably ancient and faded) graffiti consisting of the word "CUBA", sometimes with clouds and stuff around it, that was a buddy of mine from Baltimore back in the late '70s - early '80s. I remember feeling all warm inside when I'd see his tag all over places like downtown DC, San Francisco's Tenderloin, Chicago near the Greyhound station, and along Interstate 80 in the middle of Nebraska (maybe he could not afford to take Greyhound the whole way across); but the last time I recall seeing any "CUBAs" was the late '80s, and that was old then.

(Damn, here I sit telling boring stories of somebody else's "glory days"; please quonsar shoot me quick!)
posted by davy at 10:00 AM on July 15, 2005


at the end of the day its my word that outlasted yours .




posted by mishaco at 10:05 AM on July 15, 2005


I read lots of Situationist stuff, long ago. Forgot most of it by now. Here's a bit that seems relevant:

At this point in the world’s development, all forms of expression are losing their grip on reality and being reduced to self-parody. As the readers of this journal can frequently verify, present-day writing invariably has an element of parody. As the “User’s Guide” notes: “It is necessary to conceive of a parodic-serious stage where the accumulation of detourned elements, far from aiming to arouse indignation or laughter by alluding to some original work, will express our indifference toward a meaningless and forgotten original, and concern itself with rendering a certain sublimity.”

So... I don't think Borf quite made it to that stage.
posted by sfenders at 10:12 AM on July 15, 2005


brownpau writes "The sad part is that it's all 'art.' The graffiti is art, the statements are art, the dubious parody is art, society's reactions are part of the art, this thread is part of the art, the debate on whether it's 'art' is part of the art. I've found that this kind of indiscriminate, flailing Dadaism tends to be the refuge of those too lazy or self-involved to really explore and question the nuances of meaning, perception, and authorship -- concepts around which the movement was originally centered. Oh, I forgot: questioning the very seriousness of it? That's part of the art too."

Dude, that is deep. Pass the bong.
posted by terrapin at 10:16 AM on July 15, 2005


iron chef morimoto writes "Superbowl XXXX"

I assume you mean Super Bowl XL.
posted by terrapin at 10:22 AM on July 15, 2005


If the alternative is living in a world where rich corporations cover every available surface with ads--which is what seems to be the situation--then yes, I do.

What's the difference?
posted by Pollomacho at 10:24 AM on July 15, 2005


Borf was my guardian angel. Wherever I went, he was there; even on the side of a coke machine at a rest stop in New Jersey. I didn't walk alone.

I have zero interest in the proposed theories surrounding the why of what he did or the relentless attempts to pigeonhole his “artistic statement”. The point is that Borf made me smile – maybe only me from the sounds of it. He was something human in a sterile uptight landscape, particularly in areas where human traits are actively eschewed.

What's the difference?
At least in the case of Borf, the difference is that of innocence and intent. I'd rather have someone telling me how the world should be, naive or not, rather than reminding how the world is.
posted by darksquirrel at 10:35 AM on July 15, 2005


darkdquirrel, you said it! I can't speak upon the artistic merits of Borf, but what a refreshing change it was to have someone in DC showing a little creativity. This city needs Borf, and I personally will be sad to see him go.
posted by modavis at 10:57 AM on July 15, 2005


I'd rather have someone telling me how the world should be, naive or not, rather than reminding how the world is.

Then you prefer the ads to Borf then? I'm confused. Ads provide a fantasy world, "drink this, smoke this, be thinner, sexier". Borf spraypaints a picture of a kid that shot himself and writes his name on abandoned buildings and trash can lids. Now, which one of those is the world as it should be and which is the world as it is?
posted by Pollomacho at 11:02 AM on July 15, 2005


As a guerilla artist, I make a point of never making my 'improvements' permanent. And we usually leave a bottle of Johnnie Walker and an apology note to the workers who have to remove the handiwork.

Also the Situationist are frequently cited as inspiration for the work of the BLF. Our founder Jack Napier has read their work and summarized their work: a bunch of bored French philosophy students wrote an completely impenetrable script hoping no one would catch on it's absolute BS
posted by MiltonRandKalman at 11:10 AM on July 15, 2005


Now, which one of those is the world as it should be and which is the world as it is?

Neither. They're both remote from anything real or even realistic.
posted by sfenders at 11:19 AM on July 15, 2005


If the alternative is living in a world where rich corporations cover every available surface with ads--which is what seems to be the situation--then yes, I do.

I think that there are more scenarios than those two.
posted by Mayor Curley at 11:26 AM on July 15, 2005


Neither.

(And both, of course, are real enough in that the catchy slogans, the semiotic snares that catch anyone literate enough to be deceived, are etched into the city and don't go away when you close your eyes.)
posted by sfenders at 11:38 AM on July 15, 2005


Also the Situationist are frequently cited as inspiration for the work of the BLF.

I think the BLF (just checked out their website) and other "guerilla artists" doing the same kind of work could benefit immensely from paying better heed to the laws and best practices of detournement as described here. In particular, "Détournement is less effective the more it approaches a rational reply" seems too often forgotten. For instance, the McDonalds billboard just seems like a crude imitation of precisely the same kind of advertising done by the original, to an end that is different but just as arbitrary. At least Borf manages to be a little more mysterious than that.
posted by sfenders at 12:15 PM on July 15, 2005


Then you prefer the ads to Borf then? I'm confused. Ads provide a fantasy world, "drink this, smoke this, be thinner, sexier".
Really? I see an ad and think "Oh look. Someone's trying to sell me some fucking cigarettes. No, no...I don't think I need any IP telephony solutions...but thanks anyway, Cisco". Which, for the record, is no fantasy of mine. I suppose that when forced through such a literal lens you can indeed force me into dismantling my own point, however, I think You know as well as I that the core meaning of both ads and graffiti lie outside of strict visual literalism. Try as we might, we're unable to do away with intent. And while you might be able to argue otherwise; I do propose that the intent behind an ad is much less noble than the intent that motivates young Borf.
posted by darksquirrel at 12:38 PM on July 15, 2005


cmonkey writes "I'd much rather look at this guy's stencils than yet another hideously sexist/racist/classist billboard"

Would you still feel that way if it was your garage door?

I just hope they catch the antisocial vandal that seems bent on leaving his "TRIK" tag on every public space he can reach around here. The glass etching is especially irritating for some reason..
posted by Mitheral at 12:57 PM on July 15, 2005


Long Live Borf!! The guy was great. I hate graffitti. But I have to admit that I admired his work and his best was really good.
posted by Ironmouth at 1:05 PM on July 15, 2005


the intent behind an ad is much less noble than the intent that motivates young Borf.

O Noble Borf! You died for our sins. Driven to madness, pursued by demons, you struggled to break through the spraypaint surface. Though it contains you still, you caught a glimpse of the other side. Consumed by samsara, you embraced dorkiness and gave birth to a crippled meme. Borf! Patient repetition of your name has brought me to a translucent happiness. Borf! Its terrible beauty has left me numb. Borf! I can take no more. The repulsive idiocy of Borf has elevated my soul enough for today.
posted by sfenders at 1:08 PM on July 15, 2005


TURK 182!
posted by klangklangston at 2:37 PM on July 15, 2005


With many of the images, the most impressive feature is sheer audacity......He changed stop signs in bustling Logan Circle to read "CAN'T STOP BORF."

Over time, there was so much of his graffiti, a Borf backlash emerged......He's democratizing graffiti. People are decorating the District's streets, even if it's just to make fun of him.

Oh, come on. Writers have been doing this stuff for decades.

Apart from perhaps sheer saturation, there's nothing special about this guy.
posted by sellout at 4:49 PM on July 15, 2005


Fuck this kid. How could you possible defend him?
posted by cpchester at 5:39 PM on July 15, 2005


How can you possibly defend yet another white wall, or worse, yet another billboard. It's only a problem if you make it one.

I think his work is awesome. He's part of the recent resurgence of good iconic graffiti that includes artists like banksy.

I welcome his addition to the public space. I'd love to have his tag on my door, or any of my stuff.
posted by blasdelf at 6:07 PM on July 15, 2005


For instance, the McDonalds billboard just seems like a crude imitation of precisely the same kind of advertising done by the original

Direct art criticism to Ron English. As for the mimicry, we intentionally use advertising language against ads. Blending keeps the improvement in the mental peripheral and from being torn down. The Johnnie Walker is still up after 2 weeks as of this morning because it looks like it's 'supposed' to be there.

As for the laws, with the exception of collaborations with Ron English all of our improvements are non-destructive and non-permanent, the only laws we break are trespassing and conspiracy.
posted by MiltonRandKalman at 7:33 PM on July 18, 2005


Don't read Debord - he's a pretentious arse. Read Larry Law's "Spectacular Times" pocketbooks for Situationist theory with simplicity and humour.

As Vaneigem said, "People who talk about revolution and class struggle without referring explicitly to everyday life, without understanding what is subversive about love and what is positive in the refusal or constraints, such people have a corpse in their mouth." (The Revolution Of Everyday Life)
posted by Pericles at 8:55 AM on July 20, 2005


OMG...cool "disco" dan was mentioned on metafilter. Twice. My life is complete.
posted by If I Had An Anus at 10:22 AM on July 21, 2005


I don't really care what borfs message was, it looks cool. And his stencils are good. It would be a shame to paint over his "99 bottles of beer" wall.
posted by Suparnova at 3:09 PM on August 4, 2005


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