Global Nomads
December 2, 2008 10:22 AM   Subscribe

Barack Obama has appointed several Third Culture Kids (TCKs) to his administration.
posted by gman (79 comments total) 11 users marked this as a favorite
 
One thing about "Third Culture Kids" is that they never, ever shut up about it.
posted by Electrius at 10:25 AM on December 2, 2008 [17 favorites]


I'm glad to see the Daily Beast (apparently) stopped that shit with the byline scorlling down the page with the reader.
posted by Navelgazer at 10:30 AM on December 2, 2008


President Van Buren grew up speaking Dutch.

And now you know... the rest of the story.
posted by East Manitoba Regional Junior Kabaddi Champion '94 at 10:31 AM on December 2, 2008 [2 favorites]


i think this is the default culture of the internet.

I've never felt particularly American, even though I've never left the country.
posted by empath at 10:36 AM on December 2, 2008 [4 favorites]


Didn't we elect one as president?
posted by boo_radley at 10:38 AM on December 2, 2008


Didn't we elect one as president?

Third sentence, first link.
posted by gman at 10:40 AM on December 2, 2008 [1 favorite]


As a TCK, I approve this message. Err.. this move.
posted by pyrex at 10:46 AM on December 2, 2008


I always wondered why Half-Elf was considered a distinct race.
posted by Midnight Rambler at 10:47 AM on December 2, 2008 [13 favorites]


So I guess, "is this entirely notable?", was the question I was driving at.
posted by boo_radley at 10:48 AM on December 2, 2008


This is some stupid bullshit. I'm a "TCK" and I have nothing in common with anyone who may or may not have grown up in some other country. We're just people, dammit--Obama's not "one of us" for me any more than any person with brown hair or a fondness for avocado would be. The first link's idiotic pop-psych generalizations don't help either.
posted by nasreddin at 10:51 AM on December 2, 2008 [7 favorites]


Electrius is right--you can spot them easily because of their unique sentence structure: "In [insert country], [insert counterpoint]."
posted by resurrexit at 10:54 AM on December 2, 2008 [3 favorites]


I read this as "Third World Kids" and I was imagining tiny black children with briefcases and mournful expressions.
posted by DU at 10:55 AM on December 2, 2008 [17 favorites]


From the first link: In 1984, Dr. Ted Ward, then a sociologist at Michigan State University, called TCKs “the prototype citizens of the future,” anticipating a time when a childhood lived in various cultures would be the norm rather than the exception. It seems that time is now. [emphasis mine]

What? This is not even close to the norm, unless you live on a military base or something.
posted by desjardins at 10:55 AM on December 2, 2008 [1 favorite]


Aramco Brats being some of the worst.
posted by gman at 10:58 AM on December 2, 2008


Electrius One thing about "Third Culture Kids" is that they never, ever shut up about it.

If there were a simple response to the question "where are you from?" - which is always one of the first to come up when initially meeting people - it wouldn't seem like TCKs go on and on about their background. That simple bit of small talk required an entire book for Obama to answer.

And did I tell you how much I miss fresh rambutans?
posted by Doktor Zed at 10:59 AM on December 2, 2008 [4 favorites]


One thing about "Third Culture Kids" is that they never, ever shut up about it.

I know, don't get me started! My brother and I have the added conversation stopper of being PK's too!

Jackasses, the lot of us.
posted by Pollomacho at 10:59 AM on December 2, 2008 [1 favorite]


I’m glad we have some more global thinkers who have traveled the world not from a position of full privilege, but all I really want is to see George Bush leaving the white house saying - ‘All I need is this lamp, this paddle game, and this chair. And that’s all I need too! …except for this’
posted by Smedleyman at 11:02 AM on December 2, 2008 [11 favorites]


“I read this as "Third World Kids" and I was imagining tiny black children with briefcases and mournful expressions.”

No, that’ll be when we outsource government operations.
posted by Smedleyman at 11:03 AM on December 2, 2008 [1 favorite]


I think living in various cultures can change your world-view. It's easiest to see the world as if it were filled with people like you. But living in another culture (not necessarily a different country) and experiencing another view of "normal life" can do wonders on broadening your view of things. Of course, you can be broad-viewed from simply taking in books, audio and video from other cultures, but living some place gives you the option to see everything working together.

In short, it's harder to cast the world as "Us vs Them" when you've lived among "them." From the first link:
Bethel feels vindicated by the collection of strong personalities that Obama has invited into the new administration. “He’s lived with so many differences around him in his lifetime, they don’t threaten him anymore,” she says.
But going to too much trouble to classify yourself as more worldly because of living many places just sets you apart from those who haven't traveled and lived abroad. You're now back in the role of being Elite, based on your mobility. The first link makes it sound like some best friends club, which isn't the idea (I think).
posted by filthy light thief at 11:04 AM on December 2, 2008 [2 favorites]


Garbage Pail Kids Rule!
posted by doctorschlock at 11:07 AM on December 2, 2008 [1 favorite]


As a person who knows several Aramco Brats and lives with one, they might as well have lived in Perfect Suburbia, USA.
posted by gman at 11:12 AM on December 2, 2008


they might as well have lived in Perfect Suburbia, USA.

Except with moonshine stills in their garages.
posted by Pollomacho at 11:15 AM on December 2, 2008


I like this Washington Post article: "He's Not Black"
posted by exogenous at 11:16 AM on December 2, 2008


Awww. I always knew I was biracial -- part indigenous American, part white.
posted by acro at 11:22 AM on December 2, 2008


Except with moonshine stills in their garages.

Siddiqi ain't the tastiest shit.
posted by gman at 11:28 AM on December 2, 2008 [1 favorite]


I just keep picturing this awful, pre-fab multicultural 80's boy band.
posted by ZenMasterThis at 11:28 AM on December 2, 2008 [1 favorite]


nasreddin, you have brown hair and like avocados too? MY BROTHER!
posted by Faint of Butt at 11:29 AM on December 2, 2008


<joke>
You know who else born into a culture different from the one he presided over as President?
&lt/joke>
posted by blue_beetle at 11:33 AM on December 2, 2008


d'oh
posted by blue_beetle at 11:33 AM on December 2, 2008


We're just people, dammit--Obama's not "one of us" for me any more than any person with brown hair or a fondness for avocado would be.

I can definitely appreciate that, but then, I've noticed that people who've lived extensively abroad tend to have much different attitudes towards their own country and other cultures than those who've lived primarily within their home country. This is not at all to say that someone who's spent their life in one country cannot be cosmopolitan and diplomatic; just that those who have spent significant time in other countries tend to be so.
posted by Marisa Stole the Precious Thing at 11:34 AM on December 2, 2008 [4 favorites]


I guess I am a TCK, though I didn't know this particular identity brand and research existed before.

One things that makes life difficult is, how do you answer the question "where are you from?" Are you from the state or country you were born but not raised in, the one you were raised in which is not the one you've lived in for the past 10/20/30 years, or what?

Another problem, particularly in the U.S. it seems, is that it's difficult to discuss your upbringing as a TCK (oh God, now I'm one of them) without sounding like a braggart. "Oooooh, I was raised overseas, aren't I cosmopolitan?" Now I just try to gloss over it as quickly as possible if it comes up in conversation.
posted by R_Nebblesworth at 11:41 AM on December 2, 2008


One thing about "Third Culture Kids" is that they never, ever shut up about it.
posted by Electrius at 12:25 PM on December 2


I'd say this is usually inimitably more interesting than "Could you pass the dip, I'm in law school" or "Nice to meet you, I went to Harvard".
posted by plexi at 11:51 AM on December 2, 2008


How well will they play with the SQK's?
posted by Zambrano at 11:56 AM on December 2, 2008


I can definitely appreciate that, but then, I've noticed that people who've lived extensively abroad tend to have much different attitudes towards their own country and other cultures than those who've lived primarily within their home country.

"Tend to" being the key phrase here. When I was at the wedding of a good friend (and Aramco Brat) in the Domincan, I had it out so badly with one of her father's (and fellow Aramco-ite) friends regarding his 'my USA, right or wrong' attitude, that her father and his best friend of 25 years haven't spoken since.
posted by gman at 12:00 PM on December 2, 2008


The Third Culture Kids haven't put out a good album since 1982, and, let's face it, that was only good because it had the single "New Wave Party Riot."
posted by Astro Zombie at 12:05 PM on December 2, 2008 [2 favorites]


Somewhat Quiet Kids?

Savoring Queenly Kumquats?

Sub-Quantum Kinetics?

Sea Quest Kids?
posted by Pronoiac at 12:07 PM on December 2, 2008


I mean: You didn't really just spell culture with a Q, did you?
posted by Pronoiac at 12:10 PM on December 2, 2008


"SQK" probably stands for "People Who Consider A Broken Leg 'Psychosomatic'"
posted by DU at 12:12 PM on December 2, 2008


Fuck yeah, SeaQuest Kids.
posted by adamdschneider at 12:14 PM on December 2, 2008


DU: Oh, it's a French abbreviation. Or is that Russian? Or Latin?

"No really, I'm okay, I just need a glass of water."
posted by Pronoiac at 12:17 PM on December 2, 2008


On first sight, this sounds as useless as all the generation something talk. That said, my younger self sometimes did search the nets for a forum for people who grew up with hippie parents in a country other than their own. Sometimes you want to hear from others with similar experiences, sometimes you just want to belong to something, to be with people you hope are similar to yourself.
posted by dhoe at 12:17 PM on December 2, 2008




I wonder what DU stands for. You folks can make up your own jokes for that one.
posted by Zambrano at 12:18 PM on December 2, 2008


I wonder what DU stands for. You folks can make up your own jokes for that one.

David Upton? Depleted uranium? Damn unicorns?

Careful, Zambrano...lots of people will gleefully skewer you.
posted by Burhanistan at 12:27 PM on December 2, 2008


I wonder what DU stands for

Wonder no more
posted by Deep Dish at 12:29 PM on December 2, 2008


As a kid, I lived four years in France and have lived in the US for the better part of the last 6 years but for the rest of my life I lived in Iceland.

When I term myself anything I usually go by "immigrant."
posted by Kattullus at 12:41 PM on December 2, 2008


When I was at the wedding of a good friend (and Aramco Brat) in the Domincan, I had it out so badly with one of her father's (and fellow Aramco-ite) friends regarding his 'my USA, right or wrong' attitude, that her father and his best friend of 25 years haven't spoken since.

That, of course, is the flip side to it - ultra-patriotism. Some people, far enough or long enough away from home, lose perspective. They begin to see their home is something greater than what it is. As an American abroad, you can expect to encounter, depending on how long you're abroad, people who question you for your country's foreign policy (especially these past 8 years), so maybe there's a bit of defense mechanism in the ultra-patriotic reaction, too. But I think a lot of these guys are just homesick.

I remember reading The Man Without a Country when I was in grade school. I wondered then, how long would I have to be away from America before I would miss it so desperately that I'd end up building a little flag-festooned shrine to George Washington? Actually, now that I think about it, it's a pretty twisted story overall. So Nolan belts out "I wish I could spend the rest of my life never hearing about America again", and part of his sentence at his trial for treason is this elaborate, Dantesque punishment? What a bizarre story.

Sorry about that. I just can't believe this was required reading. Carry on.
posted by Marisa Stole the Precious Thing at 12:52 PM on December 2, 2008 [1 favorite]


Come on, I just need some water
posted by Pronoiac at 1:08 PM on December 2, 2008


This is some stupid bullshit. I'm a "TCK" and I have nothing in common with anyone who may or may not have grown up in some other country.

You make a fair point, because you're right. Not everybody can be painted with a broad brush. Even among TCKers there are subcategories. Sure there are the "I never feel like I'm home" outsider types, but there's also those who are not like that. I agree it's silly when people pull the "I'm better because I'm more world/cosmopolitan" card about being a TCK, but I honestly wouldn't call it bullshit not just because I'm a TCK, but because I grew up and knew many of them. It's dismissive to the idea that some people have a legitimately hard time with identity issues or social awkwardness. Yea it's the internet/global age, but really? There's no difference at all? Especially when it comes to kids and uprooting from whatever culture they call their home and how they learn to adapt to it? There's a reason there's such a thing as culture shock. The TCK designation is used a lot as an identifying and coping mechanism for adults such as educators or parents to help them help third culture kids. I think it's incorrect to use it as a "I'm a special snowflake" designation, when it was more or less used a lot of times to actually help kids not feel like so much of a weirdo or outsider by giving them something to identify with.

For example, as someone said above the "TCKers don't ever shut up about it" is something I've had to deal with that I find quite annoying because it just makes me feel bad when I'm just stating a fact about myself especially when it comes to background (cross reference the "If you're from Africa why are you white?" quote from the movie Mean Girls). I myself try really hard to not be one of those obnoxious conversation stoppers/dominators, which in college just made me become more introverted than I already was in social situations because I'd only volunteer info when asked for it. Again as another poster said above, it really is hard to sometimes talk about things without giving a whole background about where you've come from. And that's why a lot of TCK kids strongly identify each other in a "one of us" kind of way, because there's a bit of "oh crap, me too!" moment of giddiness where you don't feel like an obnoxious jackhole or like you're boring or grinding conversation to a halt when you have to qualify things all the time. (TL;DR past askme answer. We just don't ever shut up, amirite?)
posted by kkokkodalk at 1:18 PM on December 2, 2008 [4 favorites]


In the case of FCC transition chair Kevin Werbach, the cultures in questions are American and Tauren.

If only he had been a level 80 Forsaken.
posted by Justinian at 1:18 PM on December 2, 2008 [1 favorite]


Electrius is right--you can spot them easily because of their unique sentence structure: "In [insert country], [insert counterpoint]."

I guess Slashdot is populated with TCKs, then.

In Soviet Russia, TCKs spot you
posted by davejay at 1:38 PM on December 2, 2008


Marisa Stole the Precious Thing : I've noticed that people who've lived extensively abroad tend to have much different attitudes towards their own country and other cultures than those who've lived primarily within their home country.

With the exception of ultranational expats that you've already mentioned, I find people who have spent a really large amount of time abroad tend to avoid phrases like "America is the greatest land on Earth" and the like.

It's not that they aren't patriotic, it's just that when viewed from a distance, the flaws in our system may seem more apparent, and exposure to some of the other great places out there my reveal that for some, America isn't the most perfect place ever.

At the very least, most of them are aware that it's not a black and white issue, and if for no other reason, these people can bring something good to our government.
posted by quin at 1:38 PM on December 2, 2008 [1 favorite]


Obama has caught a bit of flack for American exceptionalism in regard to his leitmotif "in no other country on Earth is my story even possible", but it strikes me as a sincere, recognizable conviction for someone of his background, whether or not one wants to label him "TCK".
posted by Doktor Zed at 2:11 PM on December 2, 2008


I wonder what DU stands for.

"Utterly Dyslexic."
posted by Pronoiac at 2:21 PM on December 2, 2008 [15 favorites]


I wouldn't say that "TCK"-ism is total bullshit, but some of the cutesy-tootsey stuff on the linked websites is a combination of lame and overreaching. The feelings of rootlessness, outsider-ism, and 'always being homesick' I would think are pretty unique to people who were raised as expats. And people have accused me of being aloof; I think some of that comes from the social akwardness people have talked about; and some from not understanding or being interested in the kind of 'tribalistic' associations that many people value, whether it's their country, football team, political party, or whatever.
posted by R_Nebblesworth at 2:25 PM on December 2, 2008


Siddiqi ain't the tastiest shit.

No, but when it's all you got, you learn to deal with it. But then, you'd know that, if you ever lived in Saudi Arabia, where something something counterpoint something.
posted by mckenney at 2:28 PM on December 2, 2008


In Soviet Russia, [counterpoint inserts] you.
posted by Fezboy! at 2:47 PM on December 2, 2008 [3 favorites]


Mobile Gonads.
posted by gman at 2:56 PM on December 2, 2008


Never heard of the TCK term before but I guess I'm one.

To me it means not having friends you've known since you were at primary school, because they're scattered all over the globe, not having a home-town and generally being a foreigner wherever you go... actually it's pretty awesome
posted by JustAsItSounds at 3:12 PM on December 2, 2008 [1 favorite]


Isn't this rightfully called "Second Culture Kids"? Or am I missing something? If you were born in country A, grew up in country B, and moved to country C, that's a third culture.
posted by crapmatic at 3:53 PM on December 2, 2008


If you were born in country A, grew up in country B, and moved to country C, that's a third culture.
The assumption there is that you stop at C.

Anyway, from the State Dept. description cited in Wikipedia: TCK "refers to someone who [as a child] has spent a significant period of time in one or more culture(s) other than his or her own, thus integrating elements of those cultures and their own birth culture, into a third culture" (This also assumes that the parents share the same original culture as well. As has been pointed out, (a) it's complicated, and (b) TCKs do tend to go on about it.)
posted by Doktor Zed at 4:22 PM on December 2, 2008


Pffft, not enough Americans have a first culture.

I keed, I keed.
posted by grapefruitmoon at 5:36 PM on December 2, 2008 [1 favorite]


Staus Quo, Kids
posted by Zambrano at 5:52 PM on December 2, 2008


status
posted by Zambrano at 5:54 PM on December 2, 2008


I want to be the guy that gets paid to come up with shit like "TCK" and "GenX". "Boomer" worn out? Bust out Generation X. X? Please. Millennials are where it's at. Milliwhats? It's all about the TCKs. Man, that's got to be a sweet gig.
posted by MikeMc at 7:26 PM on December 2, 2008


Fascinating concept, this TCK thing, but I think also, too narrowly defined. The common characteristics are exhibited also in people that lived outside their home culture without their parents, even as adults. My partner, who is 35, has never lived as an adult in his home country, except for the periods still with parents, during some of his education. I myself have some of this, and I barely ever even left my home state with my parents (but I'm an outlier in most regards anyway, pretty much always have been). And living abroad the last 10 years, in 4 different countries, has only enhanced things. As regards the US, I have not lived in my home state in 27 years, and have been very nomadic my entire adult life. Yet, 30+ years ago, I had a TCK housemate, and we got on well due to our commonality.
posted by Goofyy at 8:13 PM on December 2, 2008


I remember reading about TCK's a while back and thinking about something my mother told me decades ago: "you're from both worlds, and neither. You'll never completely fit in anywhere". Kind of a crushing thing to say to a 'tween, but she was pretty much right.

Labels are useful up to a point. They are more like signposts, saying "Cleveland 30 miles" or "Budapest 3452 miles". Or maybe like that signpost on M*A*S*H - everyone had a pointer set to somewhere, but the important thing was that they were all tied to that post, together. That's what they had in common.

Really, about the only thing that TCK's (or mix ups or mutts) have in common is that you can't make assumptions about what they'll be like, except very very generally. Maybe.


also: Metafilter: lots of people will gleefully skewer you.
posted by lysdexic at 9:37 PM on December 2, 2008


Barack Obama is left-handed and likes Spider-Man comics. He's like meeeeeee too!
posted by Cantdosleepy at 2:21 AM on December 3, 2008


Forwarded the links onto the girl I spoke of earlier. Her response:

well well. i did not realize there was a name for us.
TCK's. Elitist and exotic. Perfect. Everyone else can fuck off.
posted by gman at 4:05 AM on December 3, 2008


Aramco Brats being some of the worst.

I'm sorry that's been your experience. Mine couldn't be more different.
posted by empyrean at 4:05 AM on December 3, 2008


empyrean - Americans who've lived there don't tend to share my opinion.
posted by gman at 4:15 AM on December 3, 2008


The accompanying Wikipedia page is insufferable. How about a 'characteristic of TCKs'

More welcoming of others into their community. [26]

Where the reference is a sketchy Tripod page with no references or authority of its own...
posted by tmcw at 4:47 AM on December 3, 2008


So does this explain why my aunt does nothing in her life but organize high school reunions for her ex-pat high school in Japan? Cause I've always thought that was a bit sad.
posted by threeturtles at 7:00 AM on December 3, 2008


The Third Culture Kids haven't put out a good album since 1982, and, let's face it, that was only good because it had the single "New Wave Party Riot."

Wow. Making this fantasy album into a reality should totally be worked into a MeFi music challenge somehow.

We could sell the finished product on MetaFilter and donate the proceeds to various Third Culture Kid identity crisis support groups.

So now I'm a "third culture kid," I guess (as if there weren't enough black marks on my record already). Sorry about that. I'll try to stop having spent part of my childhood in another country so I can come off as less obnoxious when people ask me where I'm from or when I relate some experience I had in that other country.
posted by saulgoodman at 7:47 AM on December 3, 2008


Eh, most of the kids I knew who were raised abroad were pretty low-key about it. Then again, I grew up in an area with a LOT of military families, so not having been raised in just one place was a little more normal. Bonus: most of the navy brats acknowledged that the three years they spent on base in Japan was a whole 'nother thing from actually being raised as a missionary's kid in Indonesia or a hippy kid in Guatemala.

Of course, yes, there were some exceptions -- there's always the kid who's constantly nattering on obnoxiously about the cultural superiority of being raised abroad (usually tone-deaf, too, and unaware of his own privilege.) Meanwhile, there's always the kids who are insecure and jealous and will unfairly accuse kids who spent part of their upbringing abroad of elitism or be basically a racist dick about the idea of being brought up in another culture. Wevs. Jerks is jerks. Kids are sometimes obnoxious.
posted by desuetude at 8:04 AM on December 3, 2008


I'm partly delighted that there's a term for my experience growing up, and partly disappointed that my experience is common enough to merit a term.

I'm curious as to what I should do to shut up about it, though. "Where are you from?" is a very common, very polite small-talk staple, and for most people the answer is a quick and simple one. For me it's an epic tale, and not one I like to tell in casual social settings, but no matter how I try and deflect the question it ends up getting people more curious about it and I end up having to tell an abbreviated version of the story.

If I mention my hometown, I'm asked how I ended up where I am. If I say it's a long story, I'm met with looks of incomprehension and disbelief. If I say I moved around a lot, I get asked for examples.

I'd be very open to any suggestions as to how to casually and politely move past the topic without going into my background at all, but I have no idea how to do so as of now.
posted by MrVisible at 8:21 AM on December 3, 2008



I'd be very open to any suggestions as to how to casually and politely move past the topic without going into my background at all, but I have no idea how to do so as of now.


I dunno, it's never been all that big of a deal for me. I just say, "Well, I was born in Russia, but I've lived all over the US. I went to high school in Milwaukee [insert smirking about Midwest/suburbia here; YMMV outside NYC]. So where are you from?" If I have to talk about it, I have a brief spiel and then move on to something else.
posted by nasreddin at 8:47 AM on December 3, 2008


Wow, you were born in Russia? What was that like?
posted by MrVisible at 9:14 AM on December 3, 2008


I want to be the guy that gets paid to come up with shit like "TCK" and "GenX". "Boomer" worn out? Bust out Generation X. X? Please. Millennials are where it's at. Milliwhats? It's all about the TCKs. Man, that's got to be a sweet gig.

TCK was coined by a sociologist. Sociologists seem to love acronyms. I reviewed a sociology book that got into issues of philosophy of science, and it was full of them - STS, SSK, ANT... - So become a sociology professor, and start publishing articles, and you're on your way to coining an acronym.

Generation X was the title of a book about British youth in the 60s, apparently, which is how it caught on. So if you want to influence the culture with your cool phrase, just write a book that somehow taps into the zeitgeist and give it a name that Billy Idol and Douglas Coupland pick up on... Does sound like a "sweet gig."
posted by mdn at 11:40 AM on December 3, 2008


I always wondered why Half-Elf was considered a distinct race.

Good point! Take Dior. He's traditionally considered to have been the first of the Half-Elven, right? But in reality, being the son of Beren and Lúthien, he was really half Man, one quarter Elf, one quarter Maia (Lúthien having been born to an Elf and a Maia). Now, that of course makes Elwing 5/8 Elf, 1/4 Man, 1/8 Maia. With her famous passion for making things even more complicated she got it into her crazy head to marry Eärendil, himself born to an Elven mother and a Man father (who was eventually considered an Elf and allowed into Valinor after all, but I digress), making Elros and Elrond 9/16 Elf, 3/8 Man and 1/16 Maia.

This is where the Valar -- in their divine wisdom -- said okay, okay, hold it guys, even we don't know what the hell is going on here anymore, you gotta pick what you wanna be. (The conflict of interest, by the way, should be obvious by now: both of the twin brothers are descended in part from Maiar (lesser Ainur), and they are being put on the spot here by the Valar (greater Ainur). Nowhere does it say that Valar have this kind of authority over other Ainur -- even be they mere lowly Maiar -- and, to boot, the Valar allowed all this kinky cross-breeding to happen in the first place!

Anyhow, so it came to be that Elrond chose to be an Elf and sailed West never to return, while Elros opted to be a Man and sired the royal line that extends all the way down from the Kings of Númenor to the Chieftains of the Dúnedain, culminating in a dark figure who turned out to be a long-awaited leader, renewer and bringer of hope, who sadly would never be inaugurated because it was revealed he was actually born in Jakarta as a Kenyan national.
posted by goodnewsfortheinsane at 10:12 AM on December 11, 2008 [3 favorites]


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