We're All on Drugs
July 16, 2009 8:02 AM   Subscribe

The Top 200 Brand-Name Drugs in 2008 (via)

The top brand-name and generic drugs for 2007 and 2006 are also listed, as separate posters.
posted by Orange Pamplemousse (76 comments total) 6 users marked this as a favorite
 
Do Americans have high cholesterol?
posted by Bathtub Bobsled at 8:06 AM on July 16, 2009


Three antipsychotics in the top 30.
posted by The Straightener at 8:09 AM on July 16, 2009 [1 favorite]


Everyone has indigestion and is stressed out.
posted by Unicorn on the cob at 8:12 AM on July 16, 2009


We beat penicillin!
posted by burnmp3s at 8:13 AM on July 16, 2009 [10 favorites]


Do Americans have high cholesterol?

Where does it say this data is limited to America?

Three antipsychotics in the top 30.

And...?
posted by Brocktoon at 8:15 AM on July 16, 2009 [1 favorite]


Bathtub Bobsled, yes.

But one thing to keep in mind is that these sales don't necessarily reflect the prevalence of the disorder/disease/whatever, but its chronic nature. A single-dose antibiotic isn't going to rank in sales when compared with an asthma medication (ie. 4 and 7), simply because asthma is something that must be treated for years and years, racking up a lot of repeat business.
posted by Orange Pamplemousse at 8:15 AM on July 16, 2009 [1 favorite]


Ask your doctor...
posted by Thorzdad at 8:16 AM on July 16, 2009


Also, it appears that drugtopics.com actually compiled the data; Njarðarson Group just prettied it up.
posted by Brocktoon at 8:17 AM on July 16, 2009




Where's Paxil? I thought that was one of the most commonly prescribed anti-depressants?
posted by exhilaration at 8:18 AM on July 16, 2009


All the brand names sound like Star Trek characters.

Ensign Xalatan©, set course for Depakote™, and be on guard for the Combivent®.
posted by permafrost at 8:19 AM on July 16, 2009 [12 favorites]


"As part of our efforts to educate students about how chemistry positively impacts our lives..."

...or to educate MeFites about how Big Pharma owns our lives. I shouldn't complain; I'm on seven daily meds that seem to be keeping me alive (including one antidepressant), only one on that poster; otherwise I'm totally generic.
posted by wendell at 8:19 AM on July 16, 2009


The insulin analogs and interferons are so festive!
posted by CaseyB at 8:20 AM on July 16, 2009 [2 favorites]


"...these sales don't necessarily reflect the prevalence of the disorder/disease...."

Also because many of the drugs in the top 20 are quite expensive (e.g., up to $400/month for Seroquel and Topamax). That's why hydrochlorothiazide is way down on the generic table from 2007, even though it is one of the most commonly prescribed generic drugs (it costs pennies per pill).
posted by robstercraw at 8:21 AM on July 16, 2009


#79 sure looks effective.
posted by rokusan at 8:23 AM on July 16, 2009 [1 favorite]


The ranking is by $, not by count.
posted by DU at 8:23 AM on July 16, 2009


*pops pill of Mathrightinol, the drug for people who have to correct other people who are using math wrong*
posted by DU at 8:25 AM on July 16, 2009 [1 favorite]


I have a picture of myself as a small child wearing Procrit (#118) on my head.
posted by robstercraw at 8:26 AM on July 16, 2009 [1 favorite]


Three antipsychotics in the top 30.

And a non-trivial percentage of those prescriptions are due to the corrupt work of Dr. Joseph Biederman, a Harvard psychiatric researcher who took over $1.6 million in undisclosed consulting fees from drug makers basically in exchange for studies showing that atypical anti-psychotics are safe for use in children. From the second NY Times article, "Dr. Biederman’s work helped to fuel a fortyfold increase from 1994 to 2003 in the diagnosis of pediatric bipolar disorder and a rapid rise in the use of powerful, risky and expensive antipsychotic medicines in children."
posted by jedicus at 8:26 AM on July 16, 2009 [3 favorites]


Number 9 - Oxycontin
posted by caddis at 8:26 AM on July 16, 2009


That's the difference between small molecules and biologicals CaseyB.

Well that, and biologicals are where my paycheck comes from.
posted by Kid Charlemagne at 8:28 AM on July 16, 2009 [1 favorite]


robstercraw, many of these drugs are waaaaay more expensive than $400/month, and can make hundreds of millions from a very small population.

Biologics tend to be very expensive, and some of the cancer drugs on the list are fantastically expensive.
posted by Mister_A at 8:29 AM on July 16, 2009


It's like a periodic table of dysfunction and disease.
posted by malocchio at 8:31 AM on July 16, 2009 [1 favorite]


Despite the lawsuits and DEA activity against prescribers, Oxycontin is still 22nd by sales.
posted by PeterMcDermott at 8:32 AM on July 16, 2009


In making a joke about a a) math b) drug, I failed to use any of the letters x, y or z. /me hands in geekmedian license
posted by DU at 8:33 AM on July 16, 2009


Also, NovoSeven is not on the list - that is a huge product (in terms of dollars, not # of scripts). InVivo blog says NovoSeven did $340 million in Q1 2009. Some of these other numbers seem suspect too.
posted by Mister_A at 8:33 AM on July 16, 2009


Oooh! Let's play some Prescription Bingo at the meetup!
posted by Sys Rq at 8:34 AM on July 16, 2009


Top 200 drugs by number of prescriptions dispensed

I think this is a more telling list. And boy, do a lot of us have thyroid problems.
posted by kimdog at 8:36 AM on July 16, 2009


OK, look at 85 and 95. These shoule be the same drug in a different dosage form but it's too different diagrams, neither of which is an antibody.

To quote the bard, "I call bullshit!"
posted by Kid Charlemagne at 8:37 AM on July 16, 2009


The report leaves out biologics and only shows small molecule products. Enbrel has something on the order of $6.5 billion in annual sales.
posted by caddis at 8:37 AM on July 16, 2009


wait, they do have Enbrel, but they seem to have no idea of the sales.
posted by caddis at 8:40 AM on July 16, 2009


nothing pisses me off more than Nexium. Omeprazole is off patent!

For science nerds: Omeprazole is a mixture of both left and right handed drugs. Only one of them has the desired effect (the S-enantiomer). Facing losing the patent, what did the drug company do? Purified the effective enantiomer! That's all it is, and yet tons of people are still paying absurd amounts of money for nexium. Two omeprezoles has the exact same amount of effective drug as one nexium. Sigh....
posted by slapshot57 at 8:42 AM on July 16, 2009 [4 favorites]


Yeah, what's more, Humira had something like $4.5 billion in sales last year. Whereas if you add up Humira and Humira Pen from the chart you don't even get $1 billion. Is this profit, maybe? But even that seems like too low a margin.
posted by jedicus at 8:46 AM on July 16, 2009


Here they report $3.6B for Enbrel.

Also, look at #1–that's the lowest sales figure I've seen reported for Lipitor. If you read through the small print here, you'll see that Pfizer reports Q3 sales of $3B for Lipitor, which sounds a lot more like the $12B annual number I've generally heard for the brand. Is it possible that they are using US sales figures? Might explain a few things...
posted by Mister_A at 8:47 AM on July 16, 2009 [1 favorite]


Fascinating stuff.

Looking at the 2007 generics data, the generic antibiotic azithromycin had sales of $1.3 billion. I imagine it's hard to make, therefore expensive despite being generic. I got a kick out of #55 on the same list.
posted by exogenous at 8:48 AM on July 16, 2009


I agree slapshot, Nexium is the most ridiculous drug out there. Great job of marketing, though–they just carried the Prilosec "purple pill" over to the new purple pill and people made the switch. Here's a place for effective healthcare reform.

I should note that the FDA has become a little tighter on the me-too drugs but not tight enough.
posted by Mister_A at 8:51 AM on July 16, 2009


Here's where they got the info. The 2008 list for generics is there, and this fun one with patent expirations for 2008 and 2009 (PDF).

nothing pisses me off more than Nexium.

Ugh, and Xopenex. Hate.
posted by little e at 8:52 AM on July 16, 2009


Despite the lawsuits and DEA activity against prescribers, Oxycontin is still 22nd by sales.

That's pretty amazing.

I grew up in the seventies, and I am not unfamiliar with the occasional "opiate as entertainment". Now I'm pushing 50 and have had both shoulders and a knee worked on. I take two 10/325 oxycodone pills for pain maybe two or three times a month.

A few years ago, I was in pain but had run out of pills. A coworker who took serious medication for a back condition ( many opiates, including Fentanyl patches) gave me a "spare" Oxycontin. Holy shit, that little pill was strong. If my two oxycodones = a buggy ride, that one Oxycontin = bullet train.

I don't know who "needs" Oxycontin, but it can't be that many. I can certainly see the appeal for abuse, though.
posted by Benny Andajetz at 8:57 AM on July 16, 2009


jedicus - Somehow I missed that story. Wow. Though it's hardly surprising considering how frequently SSRIs were prescribed to kids before the jig was up.

Also let's have a moratorium on trade names for drugs that sound like destructive verbs. I don't want to abilify anything ever.
posted by inoculatedcities at 8:58 AM on July 16, 2009 [1 favorite]


The top 50, unbranded:

1. Atorvastatin
2. Esomeprazole
3. Clopidogrel
4. Fluticasone/Salmeterol
5. Lansoprazole
6. Quetiapine
7. Montelukast
8. Venlafaxine
9. Oxycodone
10. Pioglitazone
11. Escitalopram
12. Aripiprazole
13. Topiramate
14. Duloxetine
15. Olanzapine
16. Valaciclovir
17. Rosuvastatin
18. Ezetimibe/Simvastatin
19. Lamotrigine
20. Celecoxib
21. Insulin glargine
22. Levofloxacin
23. Dextroamphetamine/Amphetamine
24. Pregabalin
25. Valsartan
26. Fenofibrate
27. Tamsulosin
28. Risperidone
29. Valsartan/Hydrochlorothiazide
30. Ezetimibe
31. Donepezil
32. Tiotropium
33. Methylphenidate
34. Rabeprazole
35. Sumatriptan
36. Lidocaine
37. Levetiracetam
38. Sildenafil citrate
39. Tenofovir/Emtricitabine/Efavirenz
40. Enoxaparin
41. Sitagliptin
42. Mometasone furoate
43. Zolpidem
44. Modafinil
45. Ziprasidone
46. Tenofovir/Emtricitabine
47. Eszopiclone
48. Etanercept
49. Risedronate sodium
50. Mycophenolic acid
posted by Sys Rq at 9:11 AM on July 16, 2009 [3 favorites]


In the top row, Seroquel is the only one I haven't seen an advertisement for.
posted by vespabelle at 9:13 AM on July 16, 2009


Seroquel is an antipsychotic that is more widely used as a sleep aid, it's currently given out like candy for insomnia in community mental health clinics. From its label:

"Although less common compared with the other atypical antipsychotics, some people may develop side effects known as "extrapyramidal" effects (for example: restlessness, tremor, stiffness) or tardive dyskinesia (slow or jerky movements that one cannot control)."

Abilify:

"Abnormal or uncontrollable movements of face, tongue, or other parts of body. These may be signs of a serious condition called tardive dyskinesia (TD), which may be permanent."

Tardive dyskinesia

There are many who suffer from very severe psychotic disorders who would not be able to keep a roof over their head or stay out of the prison system without the help of antipsychotic medications, but the side effects that can come with this class of drugs are very, very severe.
posted by The Straightener at 9:17 AM on July 16, 2009


Pfizer manages to keep moving the goalpost on their number one Lipitor cash cow. The patent was originally set to expire in 2010, and it's been pushed back to June 2011.
posted by SteveInMaine at 9:18 AM on July 16, 2009


Oxycontin is nooooot to be fucked with. I was diagnosed with fybromgalgia about three years ago and have been lucky to have been covered by healthcare and treating the disease with a mix of Oxycontin (prescribed by my GP) and weight loss to lesson the stress on my joints.
Unfortunately, my healthcare ended on the last day of last month. I ran out of my medication for the first time in YEARS about a week ago. At first, I thought I'd be ok.
Then the flu-symptoms. Then the shakes, the chills, and a feeling like splinters of ice in all my joints. A bit of depression, a bit of hopelessness, and a huge dash of 'Well, I'm never taking that medication again!' mixed with an equal amount of 'God, I can't wait for my benefits to kick back in.'
Suxxor. Now I know.
posted by Bageena at 9:25 AM on July 16, 2009


What? No meloxicam? No carisoprodol? Some Top 200 list.
posted by Cookiebastard at 9:29 AM on July 16, 2009


... otherwise I'm totally generic

Don't be so hard on yourself, wendell. You are a unique and special snowflake.
posted by filthy light thief at 9:34 AM on July 16, 2009


Sometimes I feel lonely because I seem to be the only person in the developed world that doesn't take any drugs. Do they have a pill for that yet?
posted by trip and a half at 9:39 AM on July 16, 2009 [1 favorite]


You know...I'd actually like to hear from someone who can tell me that these drugs are more indicative of what is AFFECTING patients...than what is being MARKETED to patients.
posted by hal_c_on at 9:40 AM on July 16, 2009


SteveInMaine, the first sentence in your link says that a patent that was struck down is being reissued.

Thanks Ortho-McNeil
posted by Kid Charlemagne at 9:43 AM on July 16, 2009


In the top row, Seroquel is the only one I haven't seen an advertisement for.

You obviously don't read online medical journals for articles on psychiatry. Ads for Seroquel are everywhere.

It's used for bipolar adults to treat mania, depression, and transient psychosis. It's also prescribed for sleeplessness, which makes sense in a bipolar patient as sleep problems can trigger manic episodes. It hasn't been tested for long-term use and the side effects are pretty bad, unfortunately many doctors don't seem to take them seriously. The straightener mentions some of the weirder side effects. Rapid weight gain and diabetes are side effects of Seroquel as well. My friend who takes it is non-functional for 12-14 hours a day, another common side effect.

I could never imagine prescribing it for simple insomnia.
posted by kathrineg at 9:50 AM on July 16, 2009


By the way, I am not a doctor or mental health professional, just a layperson with an abiding interest in psychology and psychiatry.
posted by kathrineg at 9:52 AM on July 16, 2009


I though MetaFilter threads were supposed to be in English.
posted by GuyZero at 10:07 AM on July 16, 2009


Why is this chart a PDF and not a JPG? I find that completely unnecessary.

Man, doctors love to prescribe the hydrocodone/acetaminophen ... "take two of these every 4-6 hours and stop calling me."
posted by mrgrimm at 10:08 AM on July 16, 2009


It hasn't been tested for long-term use...

No new drug has been tested for long-term use becasue of when the patent clock starts ticking. Doing long term testing would be a lot like taking your research budget and throwing it into the street.

I'm not saying this is a good thing, hell, I've said it was a bad thing previouosly, but I'm not exactly calling the shots anywhere.
posted by Kid Charlemagne at 10:08 AM on July 16, 2009


Top 200 drugs by number of prescriptions dispensed

I think this is a more telling list. And boy, do a lot of us have thyroid problems.


Wow, if you add up the thyroid replacements in the top 20 you get 87,644 prescriptions. I don't know which other ones on that list are equivalents but it seems to win by a mile.
posted by girlhacker at 10:14 AM on July 16, 2009


We're All on Drugs

Well, no, other than caffeine and the occasional aspirin. Are all of you on prescription drugs all of the time? Maybe weaning a few people should be part of that US health care reform plan in the works.
posted by pracowity at 10:35 AM on July 16, 2009


Suxxor. Now I know.

I've never taken it, but from what I've read, Suxxor is a tough one to kick. You've got to taper off very slowly.
posted by Ratio at 10:46 AM on July 16, 2009 [2 favorites]


I've never taken it, but from what I've read, Suxxor is a tough one to kick. You've got to taper off very slowly.

That or any other opioid.
posted by blucevalo at 10:53 AM on July 16, 2009


Thanks for the Seroquel info The Straightener and kathrineg. It's true, I don't read medical journals! But I had seen the drug name as two of my tenants take it.* I'm guessing the side effects are worth it for them. One of them told me they had been hospitalized 20 times previously, but they have been living in their own apartment successfully for a few years now (and this is regular "family" housing, not supported disabled/mental health housing.) So, yay for drugs (even if they have scary side effects!)


(*note, I'm not snooping through their medicine cabinet, but they provided the info as part of their deductible medical expenses. turns out I couldn't deduct it because medicare pays for it which is a good thing because the monthly cost is almost as much as a monthly SSI benefit.)
posted by vespabelle at 11:06 AM on July 16, 2009


23. Dextroamphetamine/Amphetamine

Number twenty-three? Fuck that shit. I gotta start grabbing the world by the balls, you know? Just gotta reach in there and squeeze. Did you see the fucking Apprentice last night? I know right. I should totally be on that show, everyone on there is so fucking dumb, but not me. I'm number twenty-mother-fucking-three. Can you believe the shit that's ahead of me? Who's even heard of Levaquin? Is she the chick from Chicago that wears the fuck-me boots to all the meetings? Well no shit she's at twenty-two, if I got on my knees everytime you'd be calling me fucking Oxycontin. But seriously though we need to figure out why we're not even in the top ten. I know it is because I went to fucking state school and no one moves ahead if they went to fucking state school, even though I've been in at least, what? Twice as many hours as Actos? Ever see Actos after 6PM? No fucking way, that's because him and Prevacid went to Dartmouth together. Oh you didn't know that? Yeah make perfect fucking sense now doesn't it?
posted by geoff. at 11:19 AM on July 16, 2009 [8 favorites]


Geoff, take your medicine.
posted by PlayboyBuddy at 11:52 AM on July 16, 2009 [1 favorite]


I just finished Generation Rx by Greg Critser (author of Fat Land). It's a good overview of Big Pharma since the 60s.
posted by djb at 11:59 AM on July 16, 2009 [1 favorite]


Geoff, take your medicine.

Um, I think that's actually a startlingly awesome rendition of someone who did, in fact, take that medicine.
posted by solipsophistocracy at 12:13 PM on July 16, 2009


Pfft. This list is lame. Why back in the 90's The top four most prescribed drugs in the country were name-brand, patented, SSRI's that kept America placid and well medicated. Then the patents started expiring in the 2000's, and you know what happened? We started two wars.

Get more people pilled up, doped up, and drugged up, I say. Daddy needs his quarterly dividend check!

But on a more personal note, I need to get on the ball because I'm not on any of these. But they look fun. And not a benzene in sight. My back always hurts, can I take something for that? Maybe Backotac or Bacottack or Sleepium , or something? I hear all the ladies are taking Asperma, maybe they have something special for guys, like Testenaze or Enhardian. Do they have any that taste like grape? Or bubble gum? How about those squiggly ones. Squiggly probably tastes like bubble gum. Bubble gum rules all.

Plus, all those hexagons remind me of the special graph paper you'd use to draw outdoor campaigns in Dungeons and Dragons back in the 80's. Conquest! I am the King of Cialis!
posted by Pastabagel at 1:14 PM on July 16, 2009


I'm surprised at the absence of benzodiazepines.
posted by clockzero at 1:21 PM on July 16, 2009 [1 favorite]


Well, no, other than caffeine and the occasional aspirin. Are all of you on prescription drugs all of the time? Maybe weaning a few people should be part of that US health care reform plan in the works.
posted by pracowity at 1:35 PM on July 16


Seconding that. I don't think I've taken a prescription drug in about 25 years. I could probably stand an antipsychotic every now and then, but I think my erratic behavior keep everyone else's mind on their fucking business ISN'T THAT RIGHT, JANET?!

You know...I'd actually like to hear from someone who can tell me that these drugs are more indicative of what is AFFECTING patients...than what is being MARKETED to patients.
posted by hal_c_on at 12:40 PM on July 16


I understand the sentiment, but patients can only get these drugs from dealersdoctors who should be dispensing care first. And drug commercials are the worst marketing there is. Seriously, I've seen a trillion Nexium ads, and I still don't know what the hell it's for. Does it stop you from running slowly in fields of heather and sunflower? Or maybe it helps you to do that? I have no clue. Nexium - For the Next Time She's in the Mood. Is that slogan right? Ditto Seroquel. But I know Plavix is mouthwash. And Enablex is what my alcoholic friends give me at the start of every Friday night.
posted by Pastabagel at 1:34 PM on July 16, 2009


Three observations everyone should make:

1. Almost every single one of those drugs (excepting cancer and anti-infectives), expensive as they are, has a cheaper and equally efficacious and safe alternative. This means that saying "the price of prescription drugs is too high" misses the point. It's like saying a Gucci bag costs too much.

1b. It therefore also places the onus on docs to choose cost effective meds; but you have to incentivize them to do this.

2. "There are three antipsychotics on the list." You've been brainwashed. 11 years ago Seroquel was determined to be an antipsychotic. Now, they show that it treats depression. So we think it is an antipsychotic that treats depression. This is an accident of history. It could just as easily have been determined first to be an antidepressant, and now an antipsychotic, and today we'd be talking about this magic antidepressant that treats psychosis.

None of those drugs have identity, only utility. To say we need or don't need any of them is dangerously myopic.

3. Drug cos are out to make money. Ok. But the real "culprit" in getting a drug to be used a lot (Lipitor) or not is academic medicine. Data or no data, if the Expert Consensus is to use a drug, it gets used. I'm still fighting a ten year battle against Depakote, first line mood stabilizer, in the absence of any data at all.
posted by TheLastPsychiatrist at 2:51 PM on July 16, 2009 [1 favorite]


Sorry, typing too fast, I meant "three observations everyone should take note of"
posted by TheLastPsychiatrist at 2:52 PM on July 16, 2009


Well, no, other than caffeine and the occasional aspirin. Are all of you on prescription drugs all of the time? Maybe weaning a few people should be part of that US health care reform plan in the works.

Yeah, yeah, you're all better than us because you don't have mental health problems or cancer or diabetes or HIV or heart problems.

Let me tell you, my daily dose of Effexor is waaaaay healthier than the alternatives I could have chosen. I'm glad I'm in Canada and no one's glibly talking about sacrificing my mental health in order to have national "health" care.
posted by heatherann at 6:22 PM on July 16, 2009 [1 favorite]


This could have been interesting but they fucked up the data too badly for it to have any value.
posted by caddis at 6:36 PM on July 16, 2009


Fact: prescription opiates are a perk reserved for the American elite... Free drugs are, with free sex, the top perks of fame in America. That's why every American celebrity is on drugs. Your favorite stars, your champions of family values, your adored Wall Street predators -- every one of them is a junkie.

But they aren't running any risk of arrest. Prescription opiates aren't even illegal -- not if you're a success. When Winona Ryder was dumb enough to shoplift at Saks, she got searched and was found to be carrying seven different prescription drugs, mostly opiates. But she didn't do a single day for drugs, because it turned out doctors had prescribed every one of them. Nobody ever explained why a healthy young woman like her needed a prescription for liquid Demerol. Losers like you couldn't get that stuff even if you were on your deathbed, screaming in agony. But Winona had a bottle of it -- and got it back, with apologies, from the cops who busted her
.
posted by jcruelty at 11:47 PM on July 16, 2009


geoff.: Number twenty-three? Fuck that shit. I gotta start grabbing the world by the balls, you know? Just gotta reach in there and squeeze. Did you see the fucking Apprentice last night? I know right. I should totally be on that show, everyone on there is so fucking dumb, but not me. I'm number twenty-mother-fucking-three. Can you believe the shit that's ahead of me? Who's even heard of Levaquin? Is she the chick from Chicago that wears the fuck-me boots to all the meetings? Well no shit she's at twenty-two, if I got on my knees everytime you'd be calling me fucking Oxycontin. But seriously though we need to figure out why we're not even in the top ten. I know it is because I went to fucking state school and no one moves ahead if they went to fucking state school, even though I've been in at least, what? Twice as many hours as Actos? Ever see Actos after 6PM? No fucking way, that's because him and Prevacid went to Dartmouth together. Oh you didn't know that? Yeah make perfect fucking sense now doesn't it?

I do, in fact, take two 15mg capsules of Dextroamphetamine daily; this is in treatment of my ADD.

All I can say is: us ADD people are weird, man. I've seen normal people on several of the medications I've taken over the years, and it really whacks them out. Me? I couldn't really relax without it; and I know that I've been careful to avoid dependency, so that isn't the reason why. My brain is very clearly different from other people's brains.

Also, it's fun to whip out my little pill bottle and say: “GOD, I need some AMPHETAMINES!” just to see the reactions I get from people.
posted by koeselitz at 3:03 AM on July 17, 2009


TheLastPsychiatrist: You've been brainwashed.

Well, gee, that's not an unfortunate choice of words in a discussion about psychiatric drugs, is it?
posted by koeselitz at 3:17 AM on July 17, 2009


“GOD, I need some AMPHETAMINES!”

Seconded.
posted by Sys Rq at 7:38 AM on July 17, 2009


I'll settle for a decent cup of coffee.
posted by caddis at 7:51 AM on July 17, 2009


I don't know who "needs" Oxycontin, but it can't be that many. I can certainly see the appeal for abuse, though.

It's for people who have built up a tolerance to opiates. Since you only take them twice a month at most, you don't have a tolerance. If you took them daily (either because you were in pain, or for fun), after a few days you'd find that they didn't work nearly as well after that fifth or six day. A terminal cancer patient's daily intake might kill a healthy, non-opiate-using person.
posted by oats at 2:48 PM on July 17, 2009


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