"A smile God designed to melt mortal men's hearts"
November 2, 2010 11:06 AM   Subscribe

Stunning Audrey Hepburn photos: now you too can leaf through this marvelous Taschen limited edition by famed Hollywood photog Bob Willoughby, which sold out in hours despite its hefty price tag.
posted by CunningLinguist (55 comments total) 32 users marked this as a favorite
 
Audrey Hepburn can melt a woman's heart too.

Thanks for this!
posted by morganannie at 11:09 AM on November 2, 2010


As irresistibly pixieish as Hepburn is in her younger years, I think my favorite pic of her has to be the one where she's wearing the red sweater. Although the ones where she's stretching in the red leotard are nice as well.

Thanks for posting these, as it's terribly unlikely that I'll ever even get to hold this book.
posted by Halloween Jack at 11:16 AM on November 2, 2010


Just looking at Audrey Hepburn makes me feel like a young man again.
posted by Old'n'Busted at 11:26 AM on November 2, 2010 [4 favorites]


My favorites are the ones with the fawn, Pippin, nicknamed Ip, that her husband Mel Ferrer brought home from a movie set to keep her company after a miscarriage.
posted by CunningLinguist at 11:28 AM on November 2, 2010 [1 favorite]


my favorite all time Hepburn movie has to be My Fair Lady a classic indeed.
posted by tustinrick at 11:42 AM on November 2, 2010


Yeah, I'm not a Hepburn fan, but that fawn is pretty damn adorable.
posted by Alvy Ampersand at 11:42 AM on November 2, 2010 [1 favorite]


This is good.

Put the commentary track for Charade on just now; listening to Stanley Donen and Peter Stone talk about Audrey Hepburn is hilarious and wonderful.

Stone: Everyone says, 'Audrey was so skinny, she was so thin.' She had three copies of everything she wore, and afterwards my wife... put in for the clothes and... they hung off her! Not because she was thinner than Audrey, she wasn't, but because Audrey was a large woman! She had big bones; she had broad shoulders. In spite of her thinness, she was tall and substantially built.
Donen: I hate to disagree, but I didn't think she was tall. I mean, she's not too tall for Fred Astaire and he's not a tall man. "
Oh, but she's 5'8".
Never.
You don't think so?
No.
...Standing on her money she was.
Yes.
Alright.
posted by carsonb at 11:49 AM on November 2, 2010 [6 favorites]


Brilliant. The ones where she looks like a doll being played with by random old men hit my uncanny valley at full speed though.
posted by shinybaum at 12:02 PM on November 2, 2010


I love Hepburn, and those shots seem to capture her at the height of her deservedly-famous beauty. But to be honest, it's even more astonishing to me how gracefully and beautifully she aged.
posted by OneMonkeysUncle at 12:03 PM on November 2, 2010 [3 favorites]


The commentary track on Charade is one of the best things.
posted by shakespeherian at 12:11 PM on November 2, 2010


The inside front cover.
posted by The Lady is a designer at 12:20 PM on November 2, 2010


To my eyes there's no one like her around today.
posted by tommasz at 12:21 PM on November 2, 2010


About the photographer:

Willoughby is widely credited with inventing the photojournalistic genre of film stills. He retired in 1972 to live in a castle in southern Ireland where he translated early Irish poetry.

Not a bad life I guess.
posted by marxchivist at 12:26 PM on November 2, 2010 [8 favorites]


I have a copy of this. It really is a lovely book.
Another Taschen limited edition that you can leaf through online is.
Ellen von Unwerth, Fräulein (I have this too, and it is one of my favourite books. And that is saying a lot)
posted by Megami at 12:32 PM on November 2, 2010


To my eyes there's no one like her around today.

That's certainly possible. But its just as likely that there are plenty of young women around today who are very much like her, but the apparatus of image-making and crafting of stardom have changed dramatically. The Hollywood system of old had the ability to finely tune the public image of young starlets, controlling precisely the information and images that reached the public. Now? Well, there's a lot less control and a lot less privacy. Just consider what an 18-year-old Audrey Hepburn's Myspace page would look like...
posted by googly at 12:51 PM on November 2, 2010 [2 favorites]


The pictures aren't showing up for me. I can see the interface just fine; the pages turn all fancily, but it's like leafing through a ream of photocopy paper.

Hey, remember JPGs?
posted by Sys Rq at 12:59 PM on November 2, 2010 [2 favorites]


My favorite Hepburn movie is The African Queen.
posted by shakespeherian at 1:00 PM on November 2, 2010


I will just take this opportunity to say how much I love Taschen.
posted by Miko at 1:00 PM on November 2, 2010 [1 favorite]


>>My favorite Hepburn movie is The African Queen.

That is Katharine Hepburn.
posted by spec80 at 1:08 PM on November 2, 2010 [1 favorite]


We just watched Breakfast at Tiffany's the other day... It's got a horribly racist "asian-face" Mickey Rooney, and aside from that, where's the plot? It makes no sense. She's got a husband who supports her brother, even though he's in the Army, so what exactly is he doing..? She got the marriage annulled without his knowledge which I'm pretty sure is not possible, and what about the Sing-Sing mobster deal? How did she even come to know him, it's never explained.

And the party scene - it goes on forever, and it's great - but nothing happens! Who would dare put such a long, non-plot-advancing scene like that in a rom-com today? What a movie!
posted by r_nebblesworthII at 1:11 PM on November 2, 2010 [2 favorites]


That is Katharine Hepburn.

You'll notice I didn't specify.
posted by shakespeherian at 1:13 PM on November 2, 2010


I think shakespeherian was being facetious, spec80. At least I hope so. ;)
posted by Betty Tyranny at 1:13 PM on November 2, 2010


I love Taschen. Only they could release a $700 book and have nothing but praise heaped upon them. Why? Because they did it right.
posted by Theta States at 1:16 PM on November 2, 2010


I will just take this opportunity to say how much I love Taschen.

I do too, but would it kill them to print prices on their books?

I love Taschen. Only they could release a $700 book and have nothing but praise heaped upon them. Why? Because they did it right.

It's $700!?
posted by Sys Rq at 1:17 PM on November 2, 2010


I think shakespeherian was being facetious, spec80. At least I hope so. ;)

My face is perfectly fine, thank you.
posted by shakespeherian at 1:20 PM on November 2, 2010


Thank god for no jpg eh, sys rq? ;p
posted by The Lady is a designer at 1:20 PM on November 2, 2010


We just watched Breakfast at Tiffany's the other day

Capote didn't much care for it either. Try the book.

Myself, I can only take her in small doses. Low tolerance for gamine. And that voice - not so good.

That said, a better human being than me, and spread more positive wider than I ever shall.
posted by IndigoJones at 1:27 PM on November 2, 2010 [1 favorite]


to clarify, I like the movie precisely because of what I pointed out.

also, I had to look up the word "gamine"
posted by r_nebblesworthII at 1:39 PM on November 2, 2010


I'd seen some of these photos before, but not all - so thanks!

And I think her best film role was in Two for the Road, with Albert Finney. Definitely a must-see.
posted by chihiro at 2:40 PM on November 2, 2010


where's the plot? It makes no sense.

I weep for the youth of today.
posted by CunningLinguist at 2:46 PM on November 2, 2010 [7 favorites]


What a treat. I've always thought she was just the most beautiful woman I've ever seen. And as it turned out, she was beautiful inside and out.
posted by bearwife at 2:55 PM on November 2, 2010


Sys Rq: "It's $700!?"

It's a good book.
posted by boo_radley at 3:12 PM on November 2, 2010


Sys Rq: "It's $700!?"

Some people have pension plans for their old age, some of us collect Taschen limited editions. I think my investment is probably going to age the best.
posted by Megami at 3:32 PM on November 2, 2010


As long as it ages as well as Audrey!
posted by CunningLinguist at 3:46 PM on November 2, 2010


Check out Wait Until Dark, with a blind Audrey being stalked by Richard Crenna. Nice, funky little thriller.
posted by thinkpiece at 3:58 PM on November 2, 2010 [2 favorites]


The pictures aren't showing up for me. I can see the interface just fine; the pages turn all fancily, but it's like leafing through a ream of photocopy paper.


Do you have AdBlock on?
posted by oneirodynia at 4:04 PM on November 2, 2010


"Stunning" is extraneous when it comes before "Audrey Hepburn."
posted by Rarebit Fiend at 5:11 PM on November 2, 2010 [1 favorite]


The pictures aren't showing up for me. I can see the interface just fine; the pages turn all fancily, but it's like leafing through a ream of photocopy paper.

Sys Rq and others: try allowing Flash for this site, if you're using Flashblock, then reloading. It seems like there's a hidden flash object on the page.
posted by IAmBroom at 6:26 PM on November 2, 2010


Sorry, Sys Rq, I actually changed two things, and it seems the one I didn't mention was crucial: allow cookies for this site.

Then reload the page. Give the pics each 2-4 seconds to load, too.
posted by IAmBroom at 6:35 PM on November 2, 2010


'Audrey was so skinny, she was so thin.'

This is probably a good time to remind everyone that Audrey's legendary thinness was a result of her anorexia. (FWIW, this link disputes that Audrey was anorexic, but only after detailing her lifetime habits of severely limiting her eating habits, and several telling quotes of her self-image weight issues.)

Let's not overglamorize body dismorphia, folks. It encourages more girls to puke & starve themselves. Audrey was stunningly beautiful, and kind-hearted, and talented; but her thinness was a dangerous edge to all of that - for her and for others.
posted by IAmBroom at 6:47 PM on November 2, 2010 [5 favorites]


where's the plot?

Just for the record: the movie does not make perfect sense, and it's for a reason: it's so coy about the basic structure of the story as to be essentially Bowdlerized, concealing some of the racier components of Holly's character. The movie is a fun confection, well played, but you'll find the book tells a different story.
posted by Miko at 6:54 PM on November 2, 2010


I weep for the youth of today.

Sigh...

The plot is not really that difficult; I was engaging in hyperbole. Doesn't go over well in text, I guess
posted by r_nebblesworthII at 7:46 PM on November 2, 2010


I don't really think any of the enduring charms of BaT had anything to do with the plot.
posted by CunningLinguist at 7:58 PM on November 2, 2010 [1 favorite]


for 700$ im not hiding it under the bed.
posted by clavdivs at 8:05 PM on November 2, 2010


Hence, "What a movie!"
posted by r_nebblesworthII at 8:10 PM on November 2, 2010


I feel like I am color blind. I wish I could see it, but I have never understood her appeal.
posted by Mei's lost sandal at 9:42 PM on November 2, 2010 [1 favorite]


@tommasz

I've thought Ann Hathaway hinted at some of the essence and charm of A. H. at times.
posted by tzelig at 1:55 AM on November 3, 2010


The flash interface is annoying. JPGs are here, but only a few are the larger ones as this is what Taschen published.
posted by quiet at 4:19 AM on November 3, 2010


: it's so coy about the basic structure of the story as to be essentially Bowdlerized, concealing some of the racier components of Holly's character.

I love both the short story and the film. Both are very different, but I never found the film to be coy. It's pretty blatant that Holly is a high class escort (just as it's blatant that Paul is a gigolo).

Thanks for this post! I wish there were more color pictures of Audrey. You get so used to seeing her in black and white, that you forget how colorful and human she really was.
posted by bluefly at 5:51 AM on November 3, 2010


By today's standards, it's coy. Think about how it would be done in a remake today.
posted by Miko at 7:26 AM on November 3, 2010


A year ago I was living in an art deco apartment building where one of her aristocratic half brothers lived as well.
When I met him in the hallway I was struck how kind he and his wife were. But more than that how refined their manners and enunciation were.

My father went to the same school as Audrey Hepburn around '38. (He doesn't have any interesting stories about her though) So I have a vague interest in her. But when I look at her pictures I see a grown woman with the body of an early adolescent, of a child. I don't think 'elegant', I think 'stunted'.
Also I don't think she was a very good actress.
Ah well.
posted by joost de vries at 10:45 AM on November 3, 2010


The real thing is always better than a Jennifer Love Hewett wannabe AH.
posted by stormpooper at 11:00 AM on November 3, 2010


when I look at her pictures I see a grown woman with the body of an early adolescent, of a child. I don't think 'elegant', I think 'stunted'.

I sort of agree; I don't get the mystique, and I think a lot of it had (has?) to do with an aesthetic of its time.
posted by Miko at 12:13 PM on November 3, 2010


Whenever I consider her beauty, her body doesn't enter into it at all. It's all about that perfectly-carved face and neck - exquisite jawline, amazing brow, astounding mouth. I actually couldn't remember what the rest of her looked like without doublechecking pictures.
posted by FatherDagon at 1:14 PM on November 3, 2010 [2 favorites]


To me, it's mostly her eyes. But hey, it's metafilter. Someone will always pop in to say your favorite band sucks/is outdated/makes girls anorexic.
posted by CunningLinguist at 1:25 PM on November 3, 2010


« Older I'll just pretend   |   Yours truly Newer »


This thread has been archived and is closed to new comments