January 12, 2013

Live Action Toy Story

Live Action Toy Story. The entire movie. [SLYT]
posted by reductiondesign at 11:24 PM PST - 42 comments

Start with a kiss to break the tension?

Russell Brand Interviewed by Marlena Katene. Marlena Katene (theaacjournalist) also does a range of interviews with all sorts of comedians and celebrities.
posted by greenhornet at 9:21 PM PST - 13 comments

8-bit Music

YouTube user "rakohus" uploads his own 8-bit versions of various songs. Enjoy songs by Kanye West, PSY, Nicki Minaj, and other artists in all of their 8-bit glory.
posted by Evernix at 8:42 PM PST - 9 comments

"Mexsicko" City No More

After years of dedicated rehabilitation, the people of Mexico City have transformed from one of the worst environments in the world to one of the "greenest" cities in North America, but there are still challenges to be faced.
posted by BZArcher at 5:22 PM PST - 29 comments

Adult cat, ridin' on a ram

A cat rides backward on a ram.
posted by The Whelk at 5:20 PM PST - 40 comments

R_co's archive of EDM mixes on Soundcloud: "It's good to share"

There is a universe of recorded DJ mixes to sort through, enough to keep you entertained and dancing for years. Souncloud user R_co fills a pocket of this cosmos with thousands of mixes and some live shows to stream and download, spanning styles and decades, from Bob Marley and the Wailers live in 1975, to a Shep Pettibone Mastermix Danceparty from 1983, Mark Farina live in Los Angeles, 1996, or Masters at Work live in Miami at WMC, 2003, and Carl Craig in Ibiza, 2012. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief at 3:29 PM PST - 25 comments

Platinum coin idea preemptively shut down

The Treasury Department will not mint a trillion-dollar platinum coin to get around the debt ceiling. If they did, the Federal Reserve would not accept it.
posted by bookman117 at 2:03 PM PST - 144 comments

What went wrong and how to fix it.

Stimulus or Stymied?: The Macroeconomics of Recession: An American Economic Association panel discussion on the Great Recession between four leading economists - Paul Krugman (Princeton), Valerie Ramey (UCSD), Harald Uhlig (Chicago) and Carlo Cottarelli (IMF), chaired by Brad DeLong (Berkeley).
posted by moorooka at 1:54 PM PST - 9 comments

Viewing the Earth from orbit changes your perspective

The Overview Effect
posted by Brandon Blatcher at 1:21 PM PST - 26 comments

Treat your facebook friendships like a marketer

Facebook Friend Analyzer A new, fun way to be creepy [SLYT]
posted by UsernameGenerator at 11:33 AM PST - 30 comments


Trust Me, You Do Not Want to See This Video of a Giant Parasitic Worm Slithering Out of a Dead Spider’s Stomach
posted by Artw at 11:14 AM PST - 148 comments

Supralude's Near Deaf Experience of Williamburg

That Night In Williamsburg is a neat little motion capture time-lapse (with After Effects) of office lights synced to music. [slvimeo] [via]
posted by quin at 10:53 AM PST - 5 comments

Alaska ISN'T an island?!

Que Sera Sera posts about "Weird incorrect facts from childhood that other people have kept in their heads without reconsidering until the moment it hits them." Lots of people are learning new things in the comments. Via defectiveyeti.com
posted by artychoke at 9:39 AM PST - 626 comments

Gorgeous photos of earth tweeted from the International Space Station

Commander Chris Hadfield (previously!) and Thomas Marshburn are tweeting photos they are taking from the ISS. [more inside]
posted by gingerbeer at 8:29 AM PST - 22 comments

Free Beer: The Truth About Dishonesty

Are you more honest than a banker? Under what circumstances would you lie, or cheat, and what effect does your deception have on society at large? Dan Ariely, bestselling author and professor of psychology and behavioural economics at Duke University visits the RSA to examine the mechanisms at work behind dishonest behaviour, and the implications this has for all aspects of our social and political lives. (28:46)
RSA Animation of excerpts of this lecture and related ones: The Truth About Dishonesty (11:08)
posted by Blasdelb at 6:11 AM PST - 15 comments

"This bout brought in about 2,000 people…in a town of 3,000 people"

Journalists miss the real ($60M) roller derby story. Every time.
posted by iamkimiam at 5:00 AM PST - 46 comments

Ibn Battuta, Travels in Asia and Africa 1325-1354

"To the world of today the men of medieval Christendom already seem remote and unfamiliar. Their names and deeds are recorded in our history-books, their monuments still adorn our cities, but our kinship with them is a thing unreal, which costs an effort of imagination. How much more must this apply to the great Islamic civilization, that stood over against medieval Europe, menacing its existence and yet linked to it by a hundred ties that even war and fear could not sever. Its monuments too abide, for those who may have the fortunate to visit them, but its men and manners are to most of us utterly unknown, or dimly conceived in the romantic image of the Arabian Nights. Even for the specialist it is difficult to reconstruct their lives and see them as they were. Histories and biographies there are in quantity, but the historians for all their picturesque details, seldom show the ability to select the essential and to give their figures that touch of the intimate which makes them live again for the reader. It is in this faculty that Ibn Battuta excels." Thus begins the book, "Ibn Battuta, Travels in Asia and Africa 1325-1354" published by Routledge and Kegan Paul. Step into the world of "the first tourist" who made his mark as the world's greatest traveler before the age of steam. [more inside]
posted by infini at 3:27 AM PST - 21 comments

18 down of the 19, which is being treated with 13 15

The Rev John Graham (better known as Araucaria) is the most loved, feared and respected of British crossword compilers. Aged 91, and still at the top of his game, his achievements include the 26-letter anagram that some fans have described as 'the best crossword clue ever'. So it was only natural that he should use a set of cryptic clues in one of his own puzzles to break the news that he is dying of cancer.
posted by verstegan at 1:53 AM PST - 29 comments

Open access, open internet, closed book

Aaron Swartz, web technologist, has committed suicide. First mentioned on Metafilter for his involvement in the standardization of RSS in 2001 as a ninth-grader, most of Swartz's 26 years were devoted to leaving a lasting impact on the web. Swartz co-founded Infogami, which merged with the internet aggregator Reddit, and also founded the Internet activist organization Demand Progress which fought against the SOPA/PIPA legislation. His framework for web servers, web.py, was first released in 2006 when Reddit switched from Lisp to Python and continues to be actively used and updated. In a 2008 attempt to make a public version of the contents of the PACER public court records database, Swartz angered government officials when they learned he had downloaded 20 million articles, which he subsequently made freely available. In 2011 he was indicted for data theft for downloading large amounts from the academic article repository JSTOR. Despite JSTOR's statement indicating "no interest in this becoming an ongoing legal matter," the US case continued with additional charges, to which Aaron pled innocent in September of 2012. [more inside]
posted by Llama-Lime at 1:13 AM PST - 537 comments

Property Rights! In! Spaaa​aaaaa​aaaaa​aaaaace!

Practical, economic development of space — treating it not as a mere borderland of Earth, but a new frontier in its own right — has not materialized. Still, the promise is as great as it ever was, and, contrary to popular opinion, is eminently achievable — but only if the current legal framework and attitude toward space can be shifted toward seeing it as a realm not just of human exploration, but also of human enterprise.
posted by the man of twists and turns at 1:12 AM PST - 17 comments

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