February 9, 2014

Scientific magic and the humble pickle

Bompas & Parr Present the World’s First Gherkin Chandelier.
posted by Bella Donna at 11:29 PM PST - 20 comments

Even Robots Get The Blus

Facebook Deploys Robots to Save Blu-ray From Extinction
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 11:10 PM PST - 65 comments

Luckily most of these songs aren't dreck

The Music Scene is a television series aired by ABC as part of its Fall 1969 lineup. The show featured performances from the top musicians of the week as compiled by “Billboard Magazine” and had a number of hosts, including David Steinberg and Lily Tomlin. Many huge names of the era, including The Beatles, James Brown, Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, Three Dog Night, Tom Jones on the initial program and Janis Joplin, Bobby Sherman, The Miracles, Sly & the Family Stone, Isaac Hayes, Stevie Wonder, Bo Diddley and Mama Cass Elliot, (who co-hosted as well as performed) among many others, appearing on subsequent shows. [more inside]
posted by Room 641-A at 10:52 PM PST - 18 comments

A tragedy of epic proportions.

What tools did the Vikings use to construct their ships? During the early years of the Song dynasty, while Sridhar Acharya's concept of "zero" was making it's way westward and a pair of anonymous Anglo-Saxon poets was committing the tale of Beowulf to animal skin, a Viking craftsman lost his tool chest. It is speculated that the chest fell overboard off a ship or through the ice into what was then a swamp on the modern island of Gotland, Sweden. The chest was unearthed in 1936 when a chain attached to the chest got caught on a farmer's plow. In it were the tools a Viking blacksmith/ship builder would need to ply his trade. Named the Mästermyr chest its discovery was a boon to archaeologists, historians, re-enactors, woodworkers and blacksmiths. The original tools (catalogue of the items) were restored and put on display. Numerous copies and tributes of the chest or selected tools have been made over the years including a complete replica of both the chest and contents made using period techniques as a 'net project of a blacksmiths and woodworkers. [more inside]
posted by Mitheral at 10:11 PM PST - 37 comments

So yeah, don't even worry about it, it's just an e-card, not a big deal

Just in time for Valentine's Day, Scarleteen launches rad e-cards for "hookups or friends with benefits, open or poly relationships, friendships, sexually exclusive relationships, exes turned friends, and even the love relationship one has with oneself." Art by Isabella Rotman.
posted by DarlingBri at 9:00 PM PST - 16 comments

Supernormal Stimuli

Is Your Brain Truly Ready for Junk Food, Porn, or the Internet?
posted by Cash4Lead at 6:59 PM PST - 103 comments

The key word is "publicly"...

Michael Sam blazes a trail. Michael Sam, University of Missouri star football player, Southeastern Conference Defensive Player of the Year and prospective draft pick in this spring's 2014 NFL draft, may become the first publicly gay player in the NFL. [more inside]
posted by roquetuen at 5:52 PM PST - 116 comments

Got vinegar?

Grandmothers knew it, but commercial technology made it passe... What other substance can burnish your scissors, clean your piano keys, deodorize lunch boxes, footlockers, and car trunks, purge bugs from your pantry, and keep corned beef from shrinking....as well as 145 other things? Not much.
posted by chuckiebtoo at 4:56 PM PST - 105 comments

The Geneva Beatus: Not what anyone was expecting.

The Beatus Cycle refers the nearly 30 surviving illuminated manuscripts based on an 8th century commentary on the Book of the Apocalypse by Saint Beatus of Liebana. The commentary is primarily composed of excerpts from works by theologians such as Augustine, Ambrose and Irenaeus. While the original manuscript had illustrations interspersed with the text, beginning with Maius in the mid-10th century, the paintings were moved to more prominent full or double pages with borders. (Here’s an example of the Maius manuscript format.) As the manuscript was repeatedly copied throughout the Christian portions of the Iberian Peninsula, the original iconography combined with Maius’ layout was preserved mostly intact. In 2007 a new Beatus manuscript came to light – the 11th-century Genevan Beatus. [more inside]
posted by korej at 4:16 PM PST - 6 comments

Catch Olympic Fever!

And who doesn't love a little luge? SLYT The Canadian Institute for Inclusion and Diversity has created a brief response to Russian homophobia.
posted by kinnakeet at 4:14 PM PST - 19 comments

Rainwave: video game music radio stations, programmed by voting

Rainwave is not an online video game music radio station that plays songs at at random. Rather, the site lets the users program the playlists, based on voting for individual tracks. As an anonymous user, you can still listen to the default station with all styles mixed together, or focus on game, chiptune, cover or ocremix songs.
posted by filthy light thief at 3:37 PM PST - 7 comments

Yuletide + Youtube = Festivids

Need to take a quick break? Check out the masterlist for Festivids, a multi-fandom fanvid exchange., a multi-fandom fanvid exchange. Over 200 fanvids went live this year, including one about a day in the life of a stormtrooper in Lego Star Wars, a stark look at life in the Ozarks in the Winter's Bone, and a tribute to Ruby Rhod in the Fifth Element. Vidding Previously 1, 2, 3; Festivids Previously [more inside]
posted by dinty_moore at 2:46 PM PST - 11 comments

Assembled DNA with a different backbone seems readable by cell machinery

Much easier to put together custom DNA An interdisciplinary study led by Dr Ali Tavassoli, a Reader in chemical biology at the University of Southampton, has shown for the first time that 'click chemistry' can be used to assemble DNA that is functional in human cells, which paves the way for a purely chemical method for gene synthesis. Writing in Angewandte Chemie International Edition Dr Tavassoli's team and his collaborators, Dr Jeremy Blaydes and Professor Tom Brown, show that human cells can still read through strands of DNA correctly despite being stitched together using a linker not found in nature.
posted by aleph at 2:27 PM PST - 17 comments

eStonia

Estonia, with a population of 1.3 million, might just have the most technologically forward-thinking government around.
posted by gman at 1:02 PM PST - 31 comments

Walking City

Walking City - "Referencing the utopian visions of 1960’s architecture practice Archigram, Walking City is a slowly evolving video sculpture. The language of materials and patterns seen in radical architecture transform as the nomadic city walks endlessly, adapting to the environments she encounters."
posted by codacorolla at 12:38 PM PST - 5 comments

I'd like a dumb grande wuppy duppy latte, extra hot, please

On Friday, a Starbucks opened in Los Feliz, Los Angeles. There is something a bit "weirdly off-kilter" about this location according to one customer. In particular, everything there, including the store name has the word "dumb" in front. The store is claiming parody-based fair use exemptions to intellectual property law, and so far, the (non-dumb) Starbucks appears not to have responded. In case you want to pick what you want before hand, their menu of dumb drinks is posted on Twitter.
posted by saeculorum at 10:43 AM PST - 152 comments

"Distressed babies"

AOL chief cuts 401(k) benefits, blames Obamacare and two "distressed babies". "AOL chief executive Tim Armstrong Thursday offered a number of unusual explanations for why his company pulled back its 401(k) benefits for employees this year. The first reason: Obamacare. The second: two women at the company who had 'distressed babies' in 2012." [more inside]
posted by tonycpsu at 9:59 AM PST - 215 comments

You Can't POP Your Cherry (HYMEN 101)

Informative article and hilarious videos concerning myths about female virginity.
posted by Brandon Blatcher at 9:41 AM PST - 31 comments

A financial engineering operation masquerading as a technology company

A series of columns by Robert X. Cringely about the decline and impending demise of IBM

posted by JeffL at 8:51 AM PST - 104 comments

I beg-ee, oh, make you hear me well!

Forty eight, uh-huh, count 'em, FORTY EIGHT Fela records are now available for streaming. Make you hear this one!
posted by flapjax at midnite at 6:19 AM PST - 28 comments

People held umbrellas over the people holding umbrellas over him

A man collapses on Oxford Street, London, England and convulses in a fit. Bystanders rush over and help. That evening, on Twitter, victim and helpers find each other again and tell their stories.
posted by MartinWisse at 5:13 AM PST - 16 comments

How it's made, when it's not made in the human pancreas: Insulin

In the 1920s, two tons of pig parts were needed to produce eight ounces of purified insulin. In 1982 Humulin, human insulin produced by recombinant DNA, became the first such product approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration. Diabetes Forecast offers a look into modern insulin production.
posted by Rob Rockets at 4:22 AM PST - 16 comments

Apollo of Gaza

Fisherman find an ancient Greek bronze statue in the waters off the coast of Gaza. Now the question is how it can be preserved and what its ultimate fate will be. Here Apollo is lying on Smurf sheets (photo from an Italian article). (Previously on underwater archaeology in the Mediterranean.)
posted by larrybob at 12:43 AM PST - 38 comments

« Previous day | Next day »