'They thought I just sit on my ass all day and yell at the screen.'
July 8, 2015 3:36 AM   Subscribe

It was revealed this week that YouTube gaming star Felix Kjellberg, aka PewDiePie, made $7.4 million in 2014, sparking predictable Internet grizzling. He responds to the report in an admirably frank and charming way, discussing money, work, charity, hotdogs and the haters.
posted by nerdfish (76 comments total) 16 users marked this as a favorite
 
Kjellberg's next big thing is the launch of his book, titled This Book Loves You, a collection of inspirational quotes that he's said over the years as an online personality. For example: "Don't be yourself. Be a pizza. Everyone loves pizza."
OK charitable Swedish gamer bro, you're on: I'm a pizza - eat me.
posted by Dr Dracator at 3:49 AM on July 8, 2015 [3 favorites]


That guy's alright by me.
posted by Drexen at 4:03 AM on July 8, 2015 [5 favorites]


Excuse me while I FAKE SCREAM.
posted by Yowser at 4:04 AM on July 8, 2015


Also, fuck Polaris, which might just have the highest percentage of vile "talent" than any other agency on the planet.
posted by Yowser at 4:06 AM on July 8, 2015 [1 favorite]


Basically the same reason why reality tv shows exist. Live and let live, and haters gonna hate.
posted by numaner at 4:12 AM on July 8, 2015


I've been playing video games since before I could walk and all it's ever gotten me is yelled at to go outside. what am i doing with my life
posted by backseatpilot at 4:48 AM on July 8, 2015 [4 favorites]


It's great that he's found a way to monetize his work on these videos, but his shtick really is quite lazy. And let's not forget that the guy used to default to shouting or singing about rape until a growing backlash got him to back off of such jokes.
posted by kewb at 4:56 AM on July 8, 2015 [8 favorites]


I wish there was a scale of opportunity on this. Like is there something you can do in this vein that would net you 80-90K a year? Whenever I hear these stories it feels like the options are lose money, break even, make beer money, or make a ludicrous pile. Is anybody just sort of toodling along comfortably? Jessica Smith, maybe?
posted by Lentrohamsanin at 5:01 AM on July 8, 2015 [3 favorites]


Lentrohamsanin , there was a time in roughly 2010 or 2011 when you could do that.

One of the Mindcrack members forgot to censor in-game chat where he mentioned making $7000 a month.

He had about 50 000 subscribers at the time.
posted by Yowser at 5:06 AM on July 8, 2015 [1 favorite]


I'm more surprised that people are surprised that he makes that much.

He's has the most subbed channel, with the most individual views, on one of the largest websites in the world, owned by one of the largest companies in the world. How much would you think he makes?
posted by mayonnaises at 5:21 AM on July 8, 2015 [2 favorites]


That video is literally the first time I've seen PewDiePie open his mouth that hasn't triggered a primal and reflexive instinct to throttle him. Man is his shtick annoying.

I mean, he seems halfway likable and intelligent here. Who knew?

I'm more surprised that people are surprised that he makes that much.

It's probably less that people are genuinely surprised, and more that it provides a convenient excuse to vent existing annoyance with the guy.

Personally, I'm happy to criticize him for being horribly obnoxious (and/or avoid him to the extent possible), and not concern myself with his finances :)

(I have seriously considered knocking together a small Chrome plugin that hides all of his videos when browsing YouTube. He's almost unavoidable when you're looking for Let's Play videos.)
posted by escape from the potato planet at 5:31 AM on July 8, 2015 [5 favorites]


To be nitpicky, Pewdie Productions made 7.4 million USD in profit on a revenue of just under 7.5 million. He seems to pay himself a rather modest salary, and vlogging from your kitchen doesn't cost much, so the profit margin is huge (but of course he owns most if not all of the company so that's just a technicality :-)
posted by effbot at 5:40 AM on July 8, 2015


Is this someone I would have to own a computer to know about?
posted by Faint of Butt at 5:42 AM on July 8, 2015 [5 favorites]


There are worse people in the world that could be making that money, like bankers or (shudder) derivatives traders.
posted by blue_beetle at 5:45 AM on July 8, 2015 [14 favorites]


This makes me mad not at PewDiePie but at the 11-year old kids who sit around and watch other people play video games.

Go outside and get in trouble and shoot off bottlerockets and make a goddamned fort or swim in a river or some shit. Jesus Christ. Fucking kids. Gives me goddamned agita.
posted by (Arsenio) Hall and (Warren) Oates at 5:53 AM on July 8, 2015 [12 favorites]


I feel bad for these kids because clearly they're doing it wrong. You're supposed to watch your FRIENDS play games on their TVs, and then when they die you can mock them relentlessly until they get angry, kick a hole in a screen door, and get grounded for a week.

Not that I would do that... ahem.
posted by selfnoise at 5:59 AM on July 8, 2015 [11 favorites]


This makes me mad not at PewDiePie but at the 11-year old kids who sit around and watch other people play video games.

Look, fine, I'll go, I just need to finish part 58 (of 137) of this 100% run through this minecraft map...
posted by Theta States at 6:01 AM on July 8, 2015


The lower bound for being able to make it a full-time job seems to be a daily video or two with a subscriber base of around a quarter million viewers . Views are what pay the bills, but that seems to be the minimum level to get by.

Those with a million or so subscribers seem to all be afflicted with house buying or renovation syndromes.
posted by bonehead at 6:03 AM on July 8, 2015 [1 favorite]


Whenever I hear these stories it feels like the options are lose money, break even, make beer money, or make a ludicrous pile. Is anybody just sort of toodling along comfortably?

Smaller video series producers, like CGPGrey and Brady Haran (lots of channels including Numberphile) and others. They get by doing YouTube as a full-time job. But they still work really hard, and you either have to have a million subscribers, or release videos very often.
posted by smackfu at 6:06 AM on July 8, 2015 [4 favorites]


I guess I'm too old. I checked out this guy's channel. Millions of hits for his videos. Watched bits of a couple. It's somewhat sad, to me, that such inanity is preferred fodder for many young minds now.
posted by rmmcclay at 6:06 AM on July 8, 2015 [1 favorite]


Oh my god, do you old people have no self-awareness or what
posted by blue t-shirt at 6:10 AM on July 8, 2015 [44 favorites]


the 11-year old kids who sit around and watch other people play video games.

So I dunno, I was just observing one of them in action. He watched a couple of YouTube game play videos on the gaming rig, then he flipped over to FL Studio to work on his current electronica piece, then he went looking for a soldering iron to fix the power supply for his laptop (I stopped him), then he built a gigantic tower in Minecraft, then he uploaded a photo of his dirt bike to Facebook and changed his avatar, then he posted a couple of snarky comments under an ironic handle in a Google+ thread. That last bit is the only thing that concerns me.
posted by effbot at 6:12 AM on July 8, 2015 [11 favorites]


I subscribe to a few people on YouTube who put out videos pretty frequently and I've always wondered about the economics of it - are they just doing it for love or are they actually making enough money to justify the effort? For instance, Frank Howarth has lovely woodworking videos, some of them with stop-motion animation that must take forever. He puts out maybe one a week and they get 70k-100k views - I have absolutely no idea what YouTube pays for something like that.
posted by zempf at 6:12 AM on July 8, 2015 [2 favorites]


A rough, first order estimate is that you can earn about $1 per 1000 views.
posted by LastOfHisKind at 6:15 AM on July 8, 2015


Oh my god, do you old people have no self-awareness or what

Agita!
posted by (Arsenio) Hall and (Warren) Oates at 6:29 AM on July 8, 2015 [4 favorites]


So...this is all predicated on being eligible for Google Adwords revenue, right?
posted by oceanjesse at 6:30 AM on July 8, 2015


is this somehing I would have to grasp the concept of money to know about
posted by DoctorFedora at 6:31 AM on July 8, 2015 [13 favorites]


Thanks to Maron last week I realized I'm now a grumpy old man. I rarely watch "celebrity" type creators of original content on YouTube because fuck me, most of them are boring, and I loathe the quick editing cuts that is so much in fashion.
posted by lmfsilva at 6:38 AM on July 8, 2015


Also I had the realization last year (went through a phase of watching/playing DOTA2) that watching people play video games online really isn't all that different from tuning in on Sunday & watching people play football.
posted by zempf at 6:41 AM on July 8, 2015 [13 favorites]


He's no Boris H├Ącker.
posted by Ice Cream Socialist at 6:42 AM on July 8, 2015


Kids these days. They love this shit. They'll be alright.
posted by chavenet at 7:00 AM on July 8, 2015 [4 favorites]


MetaFilter: Sitting on our asses all day and yelling at the screen.
posted by fairmettle at 7:19 AM on July 8, 2015 [7 favorites]


Also I had the realization last year (went through a phase of watching/playing DOTA2) that watching people play video games online really isn't all that different from tuning in on Sunday & watching people play football.

Except for the stadium full of 80,000 people and the betting odds. I know that there are video game competitions and those strike me as not dissimilar to large sporting events. But I feel like watching someone complete a task in Minecraft is more akin to watching a basketball player's recorded workout session. Then again, I'm an admitted grump.
posted by (Arsenio) Hall and (Warren) Oates at 7:20 AM on July 8, 2015


Most people don't realize that YouTube is the new TV for most kids, now. Except deeper, broader, and more egalitarian. There's a subject, a channel, a personality for everyone. And if they're inspired to emulate what they like, they can, and often do, just that -- without begging understanding parents to move to Hollywood and try desperately to get some work in a hotel commercial.

And what, you hate annoying personalities and quick cuts? God, I hope you didn't grow up with MTV or Nickelodeon or some shit. Or wait, is that different? I just don't "get" Beavis and Butthead, or whatever you nostalgize from your own vapid youth?
posted by gilrain at 7:24 AM on July 8, 2015 [15 favorites]


I for one am very serious about arguing why the nonsense from my generation is better than this generation's. I think it's something worth getting mad about, and I intend to do just that.
posted by (Arsenio) Hall and (Warren) Oates at 7:29 AM on July 8, 2015 [6 favorites]


Even when I was young, I thought there was nothing more excruciating than watching other people play video games. (And don't get me started about watching other people play sports.)
posted by entropicamericana at 7:31 AM on July 8, 2015


And by the way, it's not just the kids. I'm 31 and stereotypically "don't even own a TV", but I don't get to boast about that anymore because yeah, I do often tune (tube?) into some favorite channels with my partner at the end of the day.

We have channels for exploring new food ideas, channels for learning about history, channels for science, channels for comedy, channels for art criticism, and, yes, channels for other people (creatively, amusingly, or informatively) playing video games.
posted by gilrain at 7:33 AM on July 8, 2015 [7 favorites]


If people are being fake grumpy about something they honestly don't like, that's pretty darn confusing.
posted by smackfu at 7:34 AM on July 8, 2015 [6 favorites]


I for one am very serious about arguing why the nonsense from my generation is better than this generation's. I think it's something worth getting mad about, and I intend to do just that.

I watch quite a bit of YouTube stuff, including a lot of Let's Plays. I just don't think the whole "scarecam"/yelly man formula is any good. Pewdiepie has figured out a formula with a very broad, but very shallow appeal; he's following in the footsteps of generations of popular entertainers in that regard. He's the Michael Bay of Let's Play: great production values and obvious market appeal, but pretty hard to defend except as a successful commercial enterprise.

And then you learn about stuff like the aforementioned rape jokes, which were pretty frequent in his videos until about two years ago when people got upset enough that some of his fans threatened to jump ship. That doesn't indict Youtube or even scarecam LPs or any of it, any more than the creepy racial stereotypes in a couple of the Transformers movies are an indictment of all cookie-cutter action movies. But it does make it harder to write off any and all complaints as "oh you olds are just getoffmylawning."
posted by kewb at 7:45 AM on July 8, 2015 [3 favorites]


I don't like PewDiePie either. If you judge an entire medium by only its most generally popular entries, you'll find worthless not just YouTube, but also music, painting, film, poetry, fiction...

I shouldn't get worked up, though. This is just a classic "your (or the kids') favorite source of entertainment sucks."
posted by gilrain at 7:53 AM on July 8, 2015 [1 favorite]


Metafilter: It's the Children who are Wrong. If you really don't get the appeal of PewDiePie, this Kotaku profile is a good thing to read.

I have nothing but admiration for PewDiePie. Not a fan myself, but he's made a huge amount of compelling entertainment on top of video games. Why shouldn't he make millions of dollars? He's a star indie producer, good for him. I'm mostly amazed that the business arrangements line up to work for him. Is most of his income from YouTube ad revenue sharing? That's remarkable.

The "watch people play games" content I like is League of Legends. Mostly Riot's slickly produced professional sportscasts, but also random streamers on Twitch. No one's quite talking about how much money individual streamers are making, but rumors are in the $10,000 to $1M / year range. This article suggests the top North American streamers have maybe 1/100 the audience of PewDiePie. This student project estimated top North American streamers at about $100,000 a year. The $1M/year numbers are for Chinese players and are rumor, no hard data.
posted by Nelson at 7:56 AM on July 8, 2015 [5 favorites]


Most people don't realize that YouTube is the new TV for most kids, now.

I saw a note recently about a parent who disciplines their child by restricting him to only watching television instead of YouTube. Like it or not, this is where the mass entertainment puck is going.
posted by LastOfHisKind at 7:57 AM on July 8, 2015 [5 favorites]


Fake grumpy is perfectly put. That is certainly what I was going for. Being actually mad about popular YouTube stars would be an extremely funny thing to get worked up about. Knowing this, I also recognize that deep within me, there is the knowledge that I do not understand why a person would find enjoyment watching others play video games. Such behavior is a great mystery to me. It's a far off prairie on the edge of the map of the human heart; a place I've not been and wouldn't know how to get to even if I cared to visit.
posted by (Arsenio) Hall and (Warren) Oates at 7:57 AM on July 8, 2015 [1 favorite]


The motivation to watch other people do something you also enjoy doing and seeing how their approach differs from your own, picking up new techniques, or discovering related things you may also like isn't some huge mystery.
posted by gilrain at 8:02 AM on July 8, 2015 [3 favorites]


There are people who open Kinder eggs who get 140 million+ views per month, which is about half of what PewDiePie gets. (And presumably about half the money. Think about that: $3M/yr for opening Kinder Eggs. You don't even have to talk.) So I'm not surprised at someone with an entertaining schtick getting billions of views and making money from it.
posted by clawsoon at 8:03 AM on July 8, 2015 [4 favorites]


I do not understand why a person would find enjoyment watching others play video games

I just recently watched a discussion among my friends who are parents of ~2-6-year olds whose kids will watch YouTube videos of someone (sometimes an adult, sometimes a child) unboxing (or un-gift-bagging) and playing with toys. Dozens of times over and over, if allowed. They take away the iPad when it starts to get creepy.

So...it gets worse, I guess. (This lady made 4.9MM last year.)
posted by Lyn Never at 8:05 AM on July 8, 2015 [1 favorite]


Adults enjoy aspirational consumption as much as children, if home buying, home improvement, and travel shows are any measure.
posted by gilrain at 8:08 AM on July 8, 2015 [13 favorites]


I've totally watched Let's Plays. I don't own any gaming consoles but sometimes I hear about a particularly interesting game (Bioshock Infinite, The Last of Us) and want to see what the fuss is about. I consider it like a miniseries. Also I'm too lazy/unskilled to play the hard parts, even if I did have a console, so it's nice to be able to skip those and just see the story elements.

I used to watch clips of PewDiePie's teamups with Cryaotic, when that was a thing. They had really charming, goofy chemistry. He hams it up too much now for my taste though.

I dunno, guys, all you people wondering why someone would want to watch another person play a video game might as well be saying "I don't understand audiobooks, why would you want to listen to someone else read a book?" or wondering why someone would want to watch sports. Games can be enjoyable for reasons beyond the pleasure you get from playing it yourself.
posted by Solon and Thanks at 8:37 AM on July 8, 2015 [6 favorites]


Home buying, home improvement, and travel shows, though, can be informative in a way that lets you learn how to buy a home (as far as what options are out there), how to fix a house, and what to look for when you travel to a place. Watching someone play a video game though, isn't as informative, unless you're looking for help for that game. The only time I've ever watched an entire Let's Play series was for Shantae, because I lacked a gameboy emulator and I wanted the next best thing to experience her hair-whipping and animal-transforming-dancing.

That said, I'm an adult who don't find home buying and home improvement shows aspirational, because they're often very unrealistic for my life. I do watch travel shows to know where to travel though, because you really can just fly somewhere and go to that exact spot once you've saved up enough.
posted by numaner at 8:39 AM on July 8, 2015


Watching someone play a video game though, isn't as informative, unless you're looking for help for that game.

Well, yeah! That's a big reason to watch people play games. I can't tell you how many young kids I know who spend half their gaming time playing Minecraft and the other half watching people play Minecraft. Then applying what they learned from the video into their own games. Kids learn by watching others do things; why not learn from watching videos?

For myself, part of why I like watching League of Legends players is that I play the game myself and it's fun to watch the experts and imagine myself playing at their level. Or to learn to play better. When the new champion Bard came out Aphromoo played a lot of Bard. I watched every video clip I could find to try to figure out how to play Bard better myself. It's not complicated to understand the appeal of that.

But I think there's something more interesting going on with watching people play games; the social aspect. I love watching Aphromoo because he's not only a good player, he's also quietly hilarious and laid back. It's fun to watch him enjoying himself. LoL fans for instance have interesting relationships with their favorite streamers. Popular streamers are friendly and personable in a surprisingly intimate way. It feels quite personal watching someone playing at 1am, listening to them ramble on and chat with viewers and listen to their music. Oh yeah, and watching them play the game too. I find this kind of mediated social relationship a bit creepy, it's too synthetic for me. But it's also sincere and fun for a lot of people so why not?
posted by Nelson at 9:10 AM on July 8, 2015 [1 favorite]


Watching someone play a video game though, isn't as informative, unless you're looking for help for that game.

I have no data to back this up, but I think a lot of the more long-lived and popular "let's play" type series are for games that do benefit from watching someone else for tips or inspiration - Minecraft especially, but also Kerbal Space Program, other crafting-type games, and MOBAs.

I like watching videos about KSP because I play the game and I like to see what kinds of wacky ships people can come up with. I also watch lots of "quick looks" just to get a sense of the new games that are coming out and to be able to discuss them at least semi-informatively, even though I only game on PC and a lot of these games never show up there. I especially like watching local multiplayer games with a good "cast" because I just can't seem to wrangle three other people to come over and play Towerfall or Magicka on my own couch.
posted by backseatpilot at 10:30 AM on July 8, 2015


I've seen an episode or two of this kid's show last year. While the content is not up my street (I go on YouTube these days to catch John Oliver clips), my inner 12-year-old thinks PewDiePie's awfully cute!
posted by droplet at 10:30 AM on July 8, 2015 [3 favorites]


Speaking of video content about games for kids, does anyone know anything about Good Game: Spawn Point? It's an Australian show about gamer culture that's very popular with The Kids, or so the Internet tells me. The shows are online. It's more of a traditional TV production than something like PewDiePie but seems to be aimed at the same demographic. It also seems pretty good.
posted by Nelson at 10:36 AM on July 8, 2015 [1 favorite]


I'm 32 and didn't really grow up around games, other than Mario. I became a gamer by watching other people play games, and by watching people on YouTube play games. Frequently still, watching someone else play gives me the confidence to try something new. I've watched a lot of Let's Plays that offered different perspectives and insights than I had. Also, it's pretty fun to watch someone play something like a horror game...especialy if you're too scared to play. Like you're getting to experience a horror movie with other people without having to be totally emersed in it.
posted by persephone's rant at 10:40 AM on July 8, 2015 [6 favorites]


So...this is all predicated on being eligible for Google Adwords revenue, right?

YouTube ad rev share. It's not AdWords.
posted by GuyZero at 10:42 AM on July 8, 2015


Also, it's pretty fun to watch someone play something like a horror game...especialy if you're too scared to play. Like you're getting to experience a horror movie with other people without having to be totally emersed in it.

Yes, this. I cannot for the life of me play a horror game -- I get way too immersed, and while I understand that some people get a kick out of the adrenaline rush that fear provides, I am not one of those people. The only horror games I've ever completed were Silent Hill 2 and 3, and only because the story dragged me through them kicking and screaming. However, I can watch video of someone else play a horror game all day long. (Unless they have one of those stupid-ass facecams.) And besides horror games, there are bunches of other games I'd never play because don't like a particular type of gameplay, but am interested in the story. Or just games I can't run because I don't have that hardware.

Also, some LPers are just entertaining in their own right. My go-to example is Supergreatfriend, who is just a really funny and well-spoken guy. Or take Chip Cheezum & General Ironicus's Metal Gear Solid 3 LP, where Chip knows and demonstrates every damn thing there is to know about that game, while Ironicus, who knows nothing about it, makes very funny and occasionally baffled commentary. Or Lobos Jr., who is such a pro at From Software's notoriously-difficult Souls games that he did a run of Bloodborne using only a torch as his weapon. (Apparently, his current game is a run of the first Dark Souls with the video flipped upside-down.)
posted by rifflesby at 11:20 AM on July 8, 2015 [6 favorites]


There are people who open Kinder eggs

I cannot stop watching this what have you done
posted by The Minotaur at 11:29 AM on July 8, 2015 [3 favorites]


Does PewDiePie even do that many Let's Plays? He only has a few on his channel (I started watching his Catherine one and it's awesome) but most of the others weren't very drawn out (his Witcher 3 one is only a few videos) and others are just him goofing around (Skate 3 and GTA 5).
posted by gucci mane at 11:31 AM on July 8, 2015


SuperGreatFriend is truly an argument for the (well done) Let's Play form as both entertaining documentary and oral-visual history of an entire game.
posted by gilrain at 11:31 AM on July 8, 2015 [4 favorites]


I have zero interest in buying a house or watching Anthony Bourdain mug his way around the world, but I'm totally down for (say) a reading of how Dark Souls relates to Joseph Campbell, or stitching together environmental clues to tease out the story of Bloodborne's Father Gascoigne. My motivation for watching this stuff is the same as my motivation for hearing what other people think of a movie or album or novel: it's interesting to watch people engage with art and see what they get out of it, because it's probably different from what I got out of it.

And that's just one reason to like watching someone else engage with a game. There are also swathes of games I'm never going to play, because I don't have the mechanical skill or find the gameplay obnoxious, but I'd nonetheless like to experience them in some limited way.

Kjellberg's stuff doesn't speak to me, but it clearly speaks to his huge viewership. And, as always, people want to make this difference of personal preference about the correct assignment of moral value. I'm not saying Kjellberg is flawless -- his history of rape jokes and non-apology-apologies for them cannot be dismissed as simply a difference of aesthetic preference. I'm also not saying that aesthetic preferences are entirely divorced from real-world consequences. I am saying, though, that the connection between preference and consequence isn't as simple as "I don't like a thing, therefore the thing is stupid and bad, therefore the people who love the thing are empty-headed naifs whose inanition and lack of judgment will cause civilization to dissolve like the dog biscuit in Gatsby".
posted by amery at 12:09 PM on July 8, 2015 [4 favorites]


When I watch gameplay on YouTube, it's either bullet chess or Ronnie O'Sullivan dominating a snooker table. I believe I've encountered PewDiePie's videos previously but found nothing there of interest to me.

But the charming, upbeat frankness here makes this guy easy to like. And when he responded to the complaint that soldiers defending our freedom make so much less money ("Yeah, you're right. War is such a better cause... that needs more of our money and attention. That... it's really worked out well throughout history, so you make a really good point there."), I felt like sending him a large bundle of cash.
posted by fredludd at 2:06 PM on July 8, 2015 [3 favorites]


I've been playing video games since before I could walk and all it's ever gotten me is yelled at to go outside

What's been bugging me lately is it's school holidays here in Queensland so all the kids are at home. And it seems that all a lot of them do is ride their bikes around up and down the street outside my house. I'm like, why aren't you inside, didn't your parents buy you a fucking Xbox? Your bikes are noisy and your laughter is irritating me. Is there some kind of Xbox-donating charity I can turn to for kids whose parents don't love them?
posted by turbid dahlia at 3:13 PM on July 8, 2015 [11 favorites]


The generational conflict in this thread is adorable. Y'all sound like hipster grandpas yelling through your spade-cut beards at the kids on your artisanal single-source Soft Buffalo lawn.
posted by Sebmojo at 3:31 PM on July 8, 2015 [3 favorites]


Something I don't get about people in any generational discussion: Why so little recognition that tastes just differ? I'm 40. I enjoy gaming. I hate watching other people play video games. But, that's on me. It doesn't mean there's anything wrong with Let's Play videos. It doesn't mean there's anything wrong with me for not enjoying Let's Play videos. They're fine for existing, and people are fine for liking them, and people are fine for not liking them.
posted by Bugbread at 4:07 PM on July 8, 2015 [2 favorites]


Of course, hence my first comment.

I want to clarify though, like amery said, good videos of analysis of video games can be fascinating. It's just like watching a great documentary or an in depth discussion of my favorite shows and movies. Most Let's Plays are definitely not like that.
posted by numaner at 4:20 PM on July 8, 2015 [1 favorite]


I'm 43 and I enjoy watching Let's Plays. I started just for hints but now I mostly watch games that my clunky old laptop can't handle or that are on some platform I don't own.
posted by Ice Cream Socialist at 5:42 PM on July 8, 2015 [2 favorites]


Same here ICS. I started watching a really entertaining Bloodbourne playthrough last night because while I'm interested in the game I a) wouldn't have the patience for it, b) don't have a PS4, c) don't have a PC that could run it, and d) it's not being released on PC anyway. But the dude playing it is doing it in a skilled way and his commentary is fairly interesting and all in all it's an enjoyable thing to watch.
posted by turbid dahlia at 6:24 PM on July 8, 2015


It was also amusing and a little bit enlightening to me to notice slowly, as I read through the thread, that not all, but at least some of "I don't understand why anyone would watch someone else play a game" is based on not noticing the parallel to serial TV or audiobooks at all---what do you mean you might want to follow along with the story, what story?

The watching-cooking-shows equivalence for stuff like Minecraft and KSP is easier to get across than watching-a-movie equivalence given a movie made from a 50000-line script from BioWare, it seems... which is amusing.
posted by seyirci at 6:34 PM on July 8, 2015 [1 favorite]


South Park had an episode about PewDiePie and I have to agree with Kyle: playing a video game has to be way more interesting than watching someone else play it.

Though, droplet, yes, he is a very attractive young man.
posted by bendy at 6:48 PM on July 8, 2015 [2 favorites]


turbid dahlia: Same here ICS. I started watching a really entertaining Bloodbourne playthrough last night because [...] the dude playing it is doing it in a skilled way and his commentary is fairly interesting and all in all it's an enjoyable thing to watch.

Care to link? There are a few games - Bloodborne, The Last Of Us, etc - that i'd dearly love to play, but no PS4. Smart or interesting LP's might scratch the itch, since I mostly play for story.
posted by pseudonymph at 8:17 PM on July 8, 2015


My sons love PewDiePie. I hate him because he put 'I am a pug do you want a hug' in my head and every now and then it comes back again, much like the chewie ad in 'Inside Out'.
posted by h00py at 8:37 AM on July 9, 2015


Why watch somebody play a video game when you could play it yourself?
Why watch a cooking show when you could cook something yourself?
Why watch a car restoration show when you could restore a car yourself?
Why listen to an album when you could sing yourself?
Why watch sports when you could play them yourself?
posted by LastOfHisKind at 6:49 AM on July 11, 2015


Why read someone's comment when you can write one yourself?
posted by effbot at 7:22 AM on July 11, 2015 [3 favorites]


Why favorite someone else's comment when you could favorite mine?
posted by DoctorFedora at 3:27 PM on July 12, 2015 [1 favorite]


Oh sorry pseudonymph, I missed your request! I'm watching the EpicNameBro playthrough, ten episodes in and it's still pretty good. Here.
posted by turbid dahlia at 9:29 PM on July 12, 2015 [1 favorite]


turbid dahlia: Oh sorry pseudonymph, I missed your request! I'm watching the EpicNameBro playthrough, ten episodes in and it's still pretty good. Here.

Hoorah, thanks! Chromecast + mug of hot tea + voodoo doll to curse the plague gods who sent me this runny nose and sandpaper throat + this playthrough = now i'm set for tonight.
posted by pseudonymph at 11:01 PM on July 12, 2015 [1 favorite]


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