November 30

It's Christmas, Charlie Brown

"So as much as A Charlie Brown Christmas is about the significance of the religious tradition as what Christmas is "really about," it sees that tradition at least in part as a gateway to, and an inspiration for, other actions. It doesn't only suggest Christmas is really about the Bible story; it suggests Christmas is also really about friends, dogs, cooperating, the beauty of humble things, singing out loud, and hope." Linda Holmes, "'A Charlie Brown Christmas' At 50," for NPR's Monkey See. [more inside]
posted by MonkeyToes at 1:42 PM - 9 comments

My Dark California Dream

My Dark California Dream. Confusing one’s own youth with the youth of the world is a common human affliction, but California has been changing so fast for so long that every new generation gets to experience both a fresh version of the California dream and, typically by late middle-age, its painful death. [more inside]
posted by mecran01 at 12:48 PM - 12 comments

Brother, can you spare an hour for a CEO down on her luck?

The Beggar CEO and Sucker Culture castigates employers who think their employees should do extra work for free.
posted by chrchr at 12:01 PM - 82 comments

The New Yorker's Animated Cover

This week’s cover, “Mirror:” a collaboration between The New Yorker (Ware) and the radio program “This American Life" (Glass) and Hanna Rosin.
posted by OmieWise at 11:18 AM - 13 comments

Jeb! as Marilyn in the Style of Warhol

This week is Art Basel Miami Beach -- the United States' leg of the three-city Art Basel art fair, at which "267 leading galleries from North America, Latin America, Europe, Asia and Africa show significant work from the masters of Modern and contemporary art, as well the new generation of emerging stars." Also in attendance will be scores or hundreds of exceptionally well-heeled art collectors, plus three US presidential apsirants. [more inside]
posted by notyou at 10:47 AM - 2 comments

How I became afraid

So long as I was smoking, I would never reach the point where there would be nothing more to be done. Emmett Rensin on the peculiar self-management of anxiety.
posted by Zarkonnen at 10:41 AM - 6 comments

Leatherman – his colleagues found him a complete tool

The Weird World Of Military Nicknames is a (mostly lighthearted) article from a site that focuses on the British armed forces: "Of course the fresh-faced recruit is too junior to protest, if s/he even understands the black humour behind their re-christening. The nickname may stick with them for the rest of their career, and will be used all the more if it particularly upsets the poor soldier / sailor / airman lumbered with it." [more inside]
posted by taz at 10:26 AM - 39 comments

The Berkeley Fish House

Eugene Tssui designed the “Fish House” – based on the tardigrade, a segmented marine microanimal – for his parents in Berkeley, California. But that’s not the only interesting thing about him. . . . [more inside]
posted by ferdydurke at 9:53 AM - 10 comments

Dying Words Project

The AIDS Reporting of Jeff Schmalz, and How It Transformed the New York Times. [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen at 9:45 AM - 2 comments

Stepping Out at The Cross-Dressers’ Ball

The Seahorse Society of New South Wales is a support organization for transvestites. While it has been around since 1971, this year marks the first time that press has been invited to the annual ball. William Verity reports for A(ustralian) Broadcasting Corporations’s Earshot: posted by Going To Maine at 9:10 AM - 2 comments

"A mixture of beneficial and problematic experiences..."

"her challenges point to a need for tech companies to openly examine patterns of hostility toward underrepresented employees that stem from no apparent cause other than irrational bias." [more inside]
posted by Annika Cicada at 8:37 AM - 9 comments

Style Out There

Asha Leo of Refinery29 travels around the world to learn about international fashion subcultures and the way fashion affects society worldwide. So far she's met Gothic (and other) Lolitas in Amsterdam, Moroccan expat culture, hijra in India, Hasidic designers in Brooklyn, Korean matchy-matchy fashion for couples, and the highly colorful world of Japanese decora.
posted by divabat at 8:17 AM - 4 comments

What Teachers Do

National Education Association president Lily Eskelsen García on what teachers do
posted by aniola at 7:36 AM - 26 comments

Timed Travel

Ever wonder how quickly you could get from London to Winnipeg a hundred years ago? Turns out it's 5 to 10 days, according to an "isochronic" map from An Atlas of Economic Geography, compiled by John G. Bartholomew in 1914. [more inside]
posted by Etrigan at 7:17 AM - 33 comments

Global weather

Windyty is a very pretty way of visualising current and forecast weather data from around the globe.
posted by Dim Siawns at 5:32 AM - 11 comments

Hattie Brazier Stands Up

In 1958, James Brazier was beaten to death by sheriff's deputies and police officers in Dawson, Terrell County, Georgia. [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns at 4:55 AM - 9 comments

November 29

“My body knows it's time to say goodbye.”

Kobe Bryant to retire after this season. [Los Angeles Times] [more inside]
posted by Fizz at 9:02 PM - 62 comments

This place has changed a lot.

These photos are why I'm trapped in Tokyo forever now is an animated photo essay about ... some kind of Tokyo.
posted by grobstein at 7:55 PM - 13 comments

Touring America has become a nightmare

For a British band to tour America it costs 7000 dollars to even get into the place and the visas arrive so late so you have to cancel your flights and gigs and rebook everything losing money and gigs before you even get there between flight reschedules . [more inside]
posted by lmfsilva at 6:32 PM - 62 comments

You do unbend your noble strength, to think/ So brainsickly of things.

Why 'MacBeth' seems to play better onscreen than onstage.
posted by shakespeherian at 5:45 PM - 16 comments

How to Start an Intersectional Feminist Club

Step One: Read this article. [more inside]
posted by ourt at 5:25 PM - 3 comments

The Daily Life of Darth Vader

Born on Tatooine. Recently got into photography.
posted by ladyriffraff at 4:33 PM - 13 comments

Because (Wild) Life is Funny

The Winners (and a small flock of runners-up) have been named in the Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards
posted by oneswellfoop at 3:17 PM - 15 comments

Must love flow charts.

Were you thinking of buying a board game for someone this holiday season? Snakes and Lattes would like to help you pick just the right one.
posted by jacquilynne at 2:23 PM - 58 comments

Say Hello To My Little House

The four-bedroom/nine-bath house at 631 Parra Grande Lane in Montecito has been sold. Built on ten acres in 1906, El Fureidis--originally called Gillespie Estate or Gillespie Palace--is one of five homes designed by American architect Bertram Grosvenor Goodhue. If you're not familiar with El Fureidis and its long and dignified history, here's a tour, and a video of an infamous owner's wedding.
posted by mattdidthat at 12:43 PM - 31 comments

Several Witty SF/F Stories from 2015--Some Humorous, Some Serious

Heather Lindsley's "Werewolf Loves Mermaid," Sunil Patel's "The Merger," and Emil Ostrovski's "Tragic Business" develop humorous situations from SF/F motifs: cryptid romance, intergalactic business negotiations, and the cycle of death and rebirth, respectively. Lincoln Michel's "Dark Air" combines common weird fiction / horror situations with a very dry, very dark sense of humor. Naomi Kritzer's "So Much Cooking" is a serious SF story about a grave possibility, but it brings the matter home via a witty parody of a cooking blog.
posted by Monsieur Caution at 11:44 AM - 9 comments

It's like Uber for Willy Wonka boat rides.

WikiTravel calls The Shanghai Sightseeing Tunnel "A slow-moving tram, through a comically low-tech tunnel of antiquated 80's era rope lights, lasers and car dealership ilk inflatables." YMMV. [SLYT, lots of blinking lights]
posted by Room 641-A at 10:22 AM - 26 comments

Antitrust Antitrust Antitrust Bring Back Antitrust

After 18 years in operation, after a federal law mandating that hospitals work to prevent needle-stick, and after two successful lawsuits resulting in BD paying more than $400 million for violating anti-monopoly statutes, Retractable Technologies made only $34 million in global sales last year. BD, with an inferior, more expensive product, sold $8.4 billion, the payouts to its competitor serving only as the cost of doing business. In 2000, the Centers for Disease Control estimated 380,000 needle-sticks at hospitals every year. Today, they estimate 385,000. “You turn on the TV and watch politicians talk about unleashing the power of the free market, that’s absurd,” Shaw says. “The American public is being denied a free market, being denied competition.”
We need a new antitrust for a new predatory era.
posted by at 8:07 AM - 28 comments

They're everywhere!

Miniature Superheroes Brought To Life Through Absurd Scenarios. (More from VSEOK)
posted by Johnny Wallflower at 8:06 AM - 17 comments

You won't get a better collection of AfroSFF

Nigerian AfroSFF writer Wole Talabi shares links to his favourite 10 short stories of 2015 with a short intro.
posted by infini at 6:02 AM - 11 comments

“The thing about the adult industry today is that it’s a very low-margin

The Porn Business Isn't Anything Like You Think It Is [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns at 4:29 AM - 45 comments

"You can’t sell something to people if they don’t want that thing."

Sending and receiving emails are important parts of his job. On average, he gets an email every 45 minutes. Sometimes, the interval between emails is only two minutes. Other times, it’s three hours. Although many of these emails are unimportant or stress-inducing, some of them are fun. Before long, whenever Michael S has an internet connection, he starts refreshing his email inbox every 30 minutes, and then every five minutes and then, occasionally, every two minutes. Before long, it’s a compulsive tic – the pecking pigeon of web usage.
If the internet is addictive, why don’t we regulate it?
posted by rorgy at 4:19 AM - 41 comments

Puttin' on the (Nancy) Ritz: Daily Booster Packs for Five Card Nancy

Before people were doing things to Garfield, they were cutting up Nancy strips and playing Five Card Nancy (previously). Recntly, playing it the old-fashioned way (and not wi-- wow, is this still up? I remember when it was this big) has become a lot easier - earilier this year, classic Bushmiller Nancy strips began rerunning on GoComics. And if those are booster packs, Random Acts of Nancy (previously) is the one-per-pack uncommon/rare card. And, of course, there is the greatest of them all.
posted by BiggerJ at 12:05 AM - 12 comments

November 28

4:51 and 4 bottles of beer

The Beer Mile recorded lowered to 4:51.9. Lewis Kent has retaken the Beer Mile (a mile/four laps run with a 355ml beer downed before every lap) record with a run of 4:51.9. (previously record by James Nielsen.)
posted by skynxnex at 8:35 PM - 29 comments

“I was – always will be – his mother.”

My son, the mass murderer: ‘What did I miss?’ [The Guardian] In 2006, Charlie Roberts walked into an Amish school in Pennsylvania and killed five young girls. His mother talks about trying to comprehend his actions.
posted by Fizz at 4:41 PM - 38 comments

This Is Not Real

This Is Not Porn (.net) (previously here) has been showing "rare, candid, funny, beautiful, strange and awesome celebrity photos" for five years. But now the site has added a category for debunking fake celebrity photos, whether through a frivolous use of photoshop, a malicious use of photoshop, or simply a misidentification. Also, don't miss the collection of gifs.
posted by oneswellfoop at 2:14 PM - 7 comments

Eavesdropping on the Hidden World

In March of 2010, programmer Eric Fry discovered a cheap digital tuner from Realtek could be modified to receive more than mere TV and FM Radio. Much more. [more inside]
posted by endotoxin at 1:54 PM - 31 comments

Also, Play Stations, kitty litter, and dinners at Alinea.

Did you buy a gold plated dildo on Black Friday? Are you sure? [more inside]
posted by jacquilynne at 1:43 PM - 44 comments

The IKEA Dictionary

The IKEA dictionary explains the origin of over 1200 IKEA product names.
posted by jedicus at 11:13 AM - 48 comments

"When you looked down at Earth, did you always know where you were?"

Chris Hadfield meets Randall Munroe - a conversation between the astronaut and the cartoonist.
posted by moonmilk at 9:37 AM - 23 comments

I'll show you where my shoe fits.

Cabinet Battle #1, explained
posted by roomthreeseventeen at 6:51 AM - 37 comments

The New, Ugly Surge in Violence and Threats Against Abortion Providers

The deadly shooting at a Colorado Springs Planned Parenthood clinic is part of a disturbing trend.
Three people were shot dead and nine injured Friday at a Colorado Springs Planned Parenthood clinic, the first time since 2009 that anyone has been killed in an incident linked to activity at an abortion clinic. The attack comes amid an exponential increase in threats and violence against abortion providers since the release of a series of viral—and widely debunked—videos.
[more inside]
posted by the turtle's teeth at 6:00 AM - 270 comments

November 27

Neural net describes video in real time

Is this scary or awesome or what?
posted by holist at 11:40 PM - 37 comments

3 immature techs: digital comps, transistors, and large-scale programs

No Damned Computer is Going to Tell Me What to Do! - The Story of the Naval Tactical Data System, By David L. Boslaugh, Capt USN, Retired
It was 1962. Some of the prospective commanding officers of the new guided missile frigates, now on the building ways, had found out that the Naval Tactical Data System (NTDS) was going to be built into their new ship, and it did not set well with them. Some of them came in to our project office to let us know first hand that no damned computer was going to tell them what to do. For sure, no damned computer was going to fire their nuclear tipped guided missiles. They would take their new ship to sea, but they would not turn on our damned system with its new fangled electronic brain.
[more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns at 8:07 PM - 22 comments

Heathcliff, it's me-- Cathy...

300 Kate Bush Impersonators Pay Tribute to the Wuthering Heights Video. There is an instructional dance video, if you'd like to recreate this at home. And the original, for your reference. (Open Culture has the backstory.)
posted by frumiousb at 5:25 PM - 69 comments

Funky Friday

"Don't Push Your Luck" is the newest release from L.A. funk and soul band, Orgone. More tracks over at Soundcloud.
posted by Room 641-A at 5:25 PM - 5 comments

“Why can't people just sit and read books and be nice to each other?”

The New York Times 100 Notable Books of 2015 The year’s notable fiction, poetry and nonfiction, selected by the editors of The New York Times Book Review.
posted by Fizz at 2:54 PM - 27 comments

You might say the secret ingredient is salt.

Laurel Randolph comes up with Simpsons inspired recipes for Paste Magazine - Clove And Tom Collins Pie - Little Meatloaf Men - Üterbraten - Thanksgiving edition.
posted by The Whelk at 9:40 AM - 59 comments


The XKCD comic for 11/24/15 is this game. The goal seems to be collecting as many gold coins as you can and put them in a coin.. depositor. (protip: you can keep pressing up to keep jumping up through the air. Hoverboard technology is sweet) [more inside]
posted by numaner at 8:33 AM - 48 comments

Endless Sky

Endless Sky is a space trading and exploration game, dubbed as a spiritual successor to Escape Velocity. It's free to play, available for Windows, Mac, and Linux, completely open-source (GPLv3), and available on Steam. [more inside]
posted by schmod at 8:19 AM - 34 comments

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