July 1

The SCOTUS Marriage Decision, in Haiku

How can so many
learned justices be right
while four be so wrong?

posted by ubiquity at 7:58 AM - 0 comments

Farewell to America

Foreign correspondents posted to America talk about the future, and the past.
posted by grubby at 6:56 AM - 6 comments

Hello from the Magic Tavern

Hello from the Magic Tavern! A few months ago, Arnie Niekamp fell through a magical dimensional portal behind a Burger King in Chicago and found himself in a strange magical land called “Foon.” He's still somehow getting a weak wi-fi signal from the Burger King and so, as you do, hosts a weekly podcast from the tavern the Vermilion Minotaur, interviewing monsters, wizards, and adventurers.
posted by robocop is bleeding at 6:53 AM - 5 comments

The severity and sympathy of Ezra Pound

As bread owes something to the wheat winnower, etc. So much happening in between. A letter from Ezra Pound to French critic/academic, Rene Taupin. [more inside]
posted by GrapeApiary at 6:38 AM - 1 comment

I was not prepared for that

13 prepared guitar videos. A prepared guitar is a guitar that has been modified with various objects (such as alligator clips or chopsticks) in order to change the sounds it produces. Here are videos from thirteen different musicians who use prepared guitars (including Keith Rowe and Fred Frith).
posted by klausness at 5:50 AM - 3 comments

Your favorite trillion-dollar weapons platform sucks

Test Pilot Admits the F-35 Can’t Dogfight
posted by T.D. Strange at 5:28 AM - 47 comments

Pau ka wiliwili nahu ka mano

"No shark repellent has ever been found to be absolutely reliable. Scientists have tried sound, bubbles, dyes, chlorine, fish poisons and copper acetate, none of which conclusively discourages a famished shark. One device that might someday be developed into an effective repellent is a mixture of lye crystals and aluminum shreds, which could give an attacking shark a fatal bellyache."
--Shark! by Peter Benchley, the 1967 article in Holiday magazine that was developed into the novel Jaws.
posted by almostmanda at 5:17 AM - 8 comments

A planetary-scale platform for environmental data & analysis

According to Wired, "Paired with AI and VR, Google Earth will change the world". But just after its tenth birthday, Google Earth is already changing the world even without AI or VR, simply by giving scientists tools to map the world's problems (NYT). Google Earth Engine has become an emerging tool in environmental monitoring, conservation, water resources, regional planning, epidemiology, forestry, agriculture, climate science, and many other fields:
In 2007, not long after taking the job at Google, Askay flew to Brazil, helping an indigenous tribe, the Surui, map deforestation in their area of the Amazon, and this gave rise to a wider project called Google Earth Engine. With Earth Engine, outside developers and companies [and scientists] can use Google’s enormous network of data centers to run sweeping calculations on the company’s satellite imagery and other environmental data, a digital catalog that dates back more than 40 years.
[more inside]
posted by dialetheia at 1:02 AM - 8 comments

June 30

Counterfeit Content

he can use this maddening awareness to inform you about your credit report [via mefi projects]
posted by kagredon at 10:56 PM - 21 comments

"one of the strictest school vaccination laws in the country"

California Gov. Jerry Brown signs new vaccination law, one of nation's toughest "The bill, one of the most controversial measures before the Legislature this year, was introduced because of concern about low vaccination rates in some communities and an outbreak of measles at Disneyland that ultimately infected more than 150 people." (LA Times) [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome at 8:06 PM - 132 comments

Aarne–Thompson 410

What do Mark A. Bedau's Weak Emergence[PDF], Stewart Cohen's Contextualism, Skepticism, and the Structure of Reasons, Paul Benson's Free agency and self-worth, and Michael G.F. Martin's Perception, Concepts, and Memory have in common? They're all Sleeping Beauties. [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns at 7:57 PM - 3 comments

Powerful And Triumphant And Lonely All At The Same Time

“Happy people don’t need you to say you understand. As an artist I don’t have much to say to happy people. And that works out great because they’re busy being content. For the rest of us, coming to terms with rejection, failure, death, and the fragility of love is very important. Some people are self-conscious about these things and maybe they don’t want to talk about them, but sometimes it just feels good to know you’re not alone. Books and music do this better than possibly anything else."
Author Joe Bonomo explores the sadness, yearning, and warmth of the music of Greg Cartwright. [more inside]
posted by Turkey Glue at 7:35 PM - 4 comments

"The secret ingredient is imagination, fear."

"The idea is that Hannibal is always eating people, regardless of what he’s feeding you. So I wanted it to look like something that could be lamb’s tongue but probably was a people tongue. Lambs’ tongues are so homely, and once you cook them they just look creepy and unappetizing, and what I want more than anything is for the food to look so delicious that you want to reach into the screen and try it, even though you know it’s people. It’s the personification of Hannibal. He’s the Devil. Why do you like him? Why do you want to get to know him? Why do you want to eat these tongues? They’re people!"
How Hannibal's food stylist, Janice Poon, creates hypothetical human meat
posted by Room 641-A at 6:40 PM - 41 comments

The Millennial Depeche Mode?

The New Division has a new album... Gemini. It's very New Wave 3.0 you can stream it here John Kunkel began writing new wave/synth pop songs in 2005 while attending California Baptist University in Riverside, California, heavily inspired by bands such as New Order and Depeche Mode. Over the next few years, the New Division began to develop into a full band, with Michael Janz and Mark Michalski joining Kunkel on synthesizer, and Brock Woolsey contributing guitar. The group gigged heavily around Riverside, developing its modern take on '80s-inspired sounds, and began digitally self-releasing singles and EPs in 2010. start here: Introspection a little darker here: Alive
posted by bobdow at 6:39 PM - 10 comments

"I try to be as responsive as I know how."

The Ultra Hal chatbot converses with itself. Ultra Hal is a learning chatbot and virtual assistant from zabbaware, as well as a $29 ticket to an Uncanny Valley of sexism, materialism and banality.
posted by snuffleupagus at 6:26 PM - 32 comments

The best New Works in every department of Literature

Well before Netflix, there was the circulating library. Although circulating libraries large and small were well-established in Britain by the middle of the eighteenth century--some of them, perhaps most (in)famously the Minerva Press, becoming publishing houses themselves--the most powerful circulating libraries came into being during the Victorian era. [more inside]
posted by thomas j wise at 3:09 PM - 6 comments

He's My Guy

Mighty Mouth Records has just released Volume 2 of The Best of Laurice. Vol. 1 was described as "70's rock meets mainstream British pop in an explosive style fusion of pre-punk, glam, psychedelic and gay themed musical gems." Featuring such catchy titles as "I'm Gonna Smash Your Face In" (as Grudge) and "Flying Saucers Have Landed." From MMR: "Recorded in the early to mid-70's at various studios in London, UK, these tracks, many previously unreleased, demonstrate the versatility and originality of a singer-songwriter who challenged society's rules ..." Vol 2 still available on vinyl. Both also on achem Spotify. Enjoy.
posted by zbsachs at 2:32 PM - 1 comment

"So does a piece of shit!"

Comedian Jack Carter has died at the age of 93. The Comic's Comic site has some great clips, as well as a link to the Shit Jack Carter Says tumblr. Also this great anecdote: "William Morris sent Reggie Rose the screenwriter, you know. He came to one of our first meetings and said, 'A sketch has got to have a beginning, a middle and an end.' Larry Gelbart said, 'So does a piece of shit!' And that was the end of Reggie Rose."
posted by anothermug at 1:43 PM - 15 comments

No other WWII training accident took so many American lives.

DISASTER AT SLAPTON SANDS Scimitar was holed when she was rammed by another vessel and was ordered to return to port. Incredibly, no one bothered to inform the operation commander of this! This left tiny Azalea to act as the sole escort. As events showed, this might have been enough except for one unspotted typographical error in the orders. The American ships were tuned to the wrong radio frequency and could not transmit to or receive from the British ship or coastal stations. [more inside]
posted by Michele in California at 1:43 PM - 11 comments

China’s annual human rights report on the US

Full text: The Human Rights Record of the United States in 2014. via
posted by infini at 1:10 PM - 27 comments

Brighton's probably still pretty expensive.

It starts with a vanguard class of young creative types reclaiming zones of social and economic dereliction, setting up what Ehrenhalt sardonically describes as “projects through which a small coterie of local artists seek to display their sheer edginess to one another”. The hipster pioneers are followed by young couples with bourgeois-bohemian sensibilities – what the French call “bobo” – who breed and fill the pavements with space-age prams. I was that cliché once, wheeling my daughters around Hackney in the gentrificational transition between murder rates falling and Foxtons arriving on the high street. Then come the really wealthy types who like urban edge fully blunted by waves of demographic change. Before you know it a draughty three-bedroom Victorian terraced house in what was once a slum costs more than £1m. [more inside]
posted by Kitteh at 12:36 PM - 28 comments

Take with a grain of salt

Are you ready to start using/buying "Artisan Salt"? You can also buy over 100 different kinds of salt at The Meadow.
posted by growabrain at 12:21 PM - 86 comments

Male and female mice process pain differently, study finds

New research into the pain processing of mice has found male and female mice process pain differently, and the discovery may also apply to other species, including humans. Scientists are now questioning what this means for the future of medical research, which until now, has had a strong bias towards experimenting on male mice. [more inside]
posted by sciatrix at 12:10 PM - 20 comments

A Rude Awakening

Sitting in his surgical gown inside a large medical suite in Reston, Va., a Vienna man prepared for his colonoscopy by pressing record on his smartphone, to capture the instructions his doctor would give him after the procedure. [more inside]
posted by katie at 11:58 AM - 109 comments

China Girls, Color TV, And Racial Bias

The Atlantic covers the fight over color TV, the women who helped push it, and how racial bias influenced the evolution of the technology. Of note is the history of bias influencing all sorts of imaging technologies, pushing towards fidelity of reproducing lighter skin tones at the expense of darker ones.
posted by NoxAeternum at 11:30 AM - 9 comments

50 Shades of Flashheart

50 Shades of Flashheart. The immortal words of Christian Grey put into the mouth of Blackadder's Lord Flashheart. (Single serving tumblr.)
posted by immlass at 11:02 AM - 24 comments

still cheaper than a condo

For $350K You Can Spend Eternity In Manhattan [more inside]
posted by poffin boffin at 10:52 AM - 24 comments

“I just want to spend my money on food & beers & going to hear music."

Chef Paxx Caraballo Moll is a rock-n-roll chef who creates inventive vegetarian food with the native foods of Puerto Rico.

They're also one of nine individuals profiled in Mala Mala, a feature length documentary exploring the lives of young Puerto Ricans in the trans community that recently premiered at the Tribeca film festival. [more inside]
posted by Juliet Banana at 9:50 AM - 8 comments

Demons For Dummies Ca. 1775

"A selection of pages from an 18th-century demonology book comprised of more than 30 exquisite watercolours showing various demon figures, as well as magic and cabbalistic signs. The full Latin title of Compendium rarissimum totius Artis Magicae sistematisatae per celeberrimos Artis hujus Magistros, roughly translates to “A rare summary of the entire Magical Art by the most famous Masters of this Art”. With a title page adorned with skeletons and the warning of Noli me tangere (Do not touch me), one quickly gets a sense of the dark oddities lurking inside its pages." - The Public Domain Review presents illustrations from a 18th century guide to demons and demonology (NSFW illustrated nudity, snakes on bits.)
posted by The Whelk at 9:37 AM - 28 comments

I will what I want.

Misty Copeland has been promoted to principal dancer of the American Ballet Theater, making the thirty-two year old the first Black dancer to hold such a position. [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen at 9:23 AM - 16 comments

Let me hear your balalaika's ringing out...

Life in USSR showcases in photos the daily life of the Soviet people.
posted by griphus at 9:18 AM - 14 comments

The alphabet of months: a year of living with multiple sclerosis

I write a lot of notes to myself these days, but this one is different. Remember the body. A strange thought. How could I forget it? And yet I do.
[...]
I have had MS for a little over a year and this has been the surprising, sometimes embarrassing challenge in my particular case: where does the disease end and where do I begin? What is the illness and what is just my maddening response to it?
Games writer Christian Donlan (previously) writes about neurology, language and life since his diagnosis with multiple sclerosis.
posted by Otto the Magnificent at 9:07 AM - 10 comments

"Her body is never a plot point. It is simply allowed to be."

I am just about the biggest advocate for “representation matters” there is, but as a white woman I never really felt it applied to me all that much. Watching Fury Road, I realized how wrong I was. I’ve been this way my entire life and I’ve never felt “handicapped.” I’m disabled, yes – there’s shit I just can’t do, but an invalid I am not. For the most part I’ve always approached life with a “figure out how to do it and just get it done” attitude; I am loathe to admit I can’t do anything and I never give up without exhausting all the possibilities available to me. Watching Fury Road, I felt like I was watching my own struggle brought to life (albeit in a very fantastical setting), and I don’t think I ever realized how truly profound that could be for me.
Laura Vaugh talks about her response to seeing a kick-ass woman with the same disability as her on the silver screen. [more inside]
posted by MartinWisse at 8:50 AM - 76 comments

The Life and Death of Misty Upham

“My name is Misty Upham, and someday you will know that name as the best living Native American actress.” This story is about her demise. How she went missing for 11 days. How she was found by folks enlisted by her family, and not by the police. How she was mocked when she most needed help. How she survived rapes. How she inspired kids. And how as an indigenous woman, she was not alone in facing injustice.
posted by goatdog at 7:13 AM - 30 comments

To bid them farewell.

For most of US history, our relationship with death was more intimate than it is today. Americans often died at home and remained there until burial, where they were washed, wrapped in shrouds, and laid out on boards while the family made preparations for a funeral feast and an at-home funeral. In addition to family, women known as “Layers Out of the Dead,” helped take care of the immediate tasks following a death. This homespun approach to death largely persisted until the Civil War, when embalming, hospitals and eventually funeral directors changed the way we dealt with our deceased. But now, with home funerals and even green burials slowly regaining acceptance, a new generation of “Layers Out of the Dead,” are emerging.
posted by zarq at 6:36 AM - 15 comments

June 29

Men! Gild your hair in the colors of MetaFilter...

In fashion news, apparently, Merman colour is the next big thing in men’s hair. This styling and particular coloring replaces "man buns" as the in-thing for the man-about-town. Radiant blues and purples predominate, with the occasional green, and the occasional very green. The effect also used on beards and mustaches for that rainbow-hipster identity. Headwear co-ordination is a possibility, and age is not a barrier; neither is being a merman when in a serious boardroom meeting. Yellow is also a choice, and many bright colors at once are possible. For MeFites wanting to make a statement, some do's and dont's. And finally, a personal favorite: you can be very old and still cool.
posted by Wordshore at 9:49 PM - 145 comments

The word forces us to reconsider ideas of default gender identities

"While Friday marked a historic victory for the LGBTQ community, it turns out there’s another advancement to celebrate: Last week, the Oxford English Dictionary released a list of 500 new entries, and among the more notable additions was cisgender. The word —which is defined as 'designating a person whose sense of personal identity matches their gender at birth'— is seen as an opposite and complementary term to transgender." Why the Oxford English Dictionary's Addition of Cisgender Matters (Anna Diamond, Slate) [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome at 7:46 PM - 199 comments

Scandals Of Classic Hollywood

The Gloria Swanson Saga: Part One
Gloria Swanson wasn’t here to make friends. She wasn’t “just like us.” She didn’t take out the garbage or “wear cotton” or go to the bathroom. Lady had a gold-plated bathtub. She married a Marquis. She was 4’11,” wore a 2 ½ in shoes, and had a waist approximately the size of my neck. She looked most beautiful when frowning. And for a period in the 1920s, she was the biggest star in the world. Swanson wasn’t evil, and she probably wasn’t even a bitch, but she just knew how to run that game. She was of a different set of stars — a different breed than Garbo, Dietrich, and other classic idols — that truly lived like demi-gods. And when Hollywood began to change the way it made and distributed films in the late ‘20s, she was one of dozens destined to remain a relic of an earlier time.
[more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns at 7:38 PM - 42 comments

Baby Tree Kangaroo raised by surrogate Rock Wallaby

In a world-first for conservation a tree kangaroo has been raised by a rock-wallaby surrogate mother [SLYT] When Makaia, a Goodfellow's Tree Kangaroo, was only five weeks old, he lost his mum. He needed a nice warm pouch to grow big and strong in, so Adelaide Zoo tried something that had never been done before... a Yellow-foot Rock-wallaby was found to be his surrogate mum. Up until now this special breeding technique, known as 'cross-fostering', has only been done with closely related wallaby species. (Includes footage of a baby tree-kangaroo unravelling a toilet-roll dispenser)
posted by coleboptera at 7:37 PM - 20 comments

And with that, for the very last time, goodbye

After nine years, 222 episodes, 100 panelists and three governments, Sandi Toksvig hosts the News Quiz for the final time (autoplaying video). Sandi is leaving her most dysfunctional family at the New Quiz (autoplaying audio) to help lead the Women's Equality Party. Miles Jupp will be the next host.
posted by gladly at 7:10 PM - 50 comments

Pixel Dailies

@Pixel_Dailies gives you a theme or subject every day for you to draw. They retweet and blog their favorites each day. The art club just had its first birthday.
posted by curious nu at 5:54 PM - 1 comment

Struck by Lightning

This morning, The New Yorker's Rachel Aviv exposed the case of Louisiana death row inmate Rodricus Crawford, a possibly innocent 23 year old man prosecuted by notorious Caddo Parish assistant district attorney Dale Cox; at the same time, the Supreme Court refused to halt lethal injections in Oklahoma (or, as some had hoped, nationwide) and recently exonerated and freed former death row inmate Glenn Ford lost his life to lung cancer. [more inside]
posted by sallybrown at 5:29 PM - 61 comments

The Frenzy About High-Tech Talent

"A recurring complaint is that not enough of our young people and adults have the kinds of competence the coming century will require, largely because not nearly enough are choosing careers that require the skills of STEM...The US has all the high-tech brains and bodies it needs, or at least that the economy can absorb."
posted by Lycaste at 3:42 PM - 117 comments

Does the moral universe arc?

On conscience, morality, and Theodore Parker in part. "Look at the facts of the world. You see a continual and progressive triumph of the right. I do not pretend to understand the moral universe, the arc is a long one, my eye reaches but little ways. I cannot calculate the curve and complete the figure by the experience of sight; I can divine it by conscience. But from what I see I am sure it bends towards justice." -Theodore Parker, 1853.
posted by shenkerism at 2:33 PM - 18 comments

1948-2015

Yes co-founder and bassist Chris Squire has died. [more inside]
posted by prize bull octorok at 12:30 PM - 105 comments

A taste for isometrics

Spotting real-world architecture in Monument Valley
posted by Artw at 12:00 PM - 7 comments

“SO DO I!!!!!”

Why Disney Marriages Never Work: [SLYT] What happens after the credit roll is the truly depressing part.
posted by Fizz at 11:59 AM - 34 comments

XOXO NAKED PISSAR DENIED

License plates Massachusetts won't let you have.
posted by jessamyn at 11:15 AM - 96 comments

Gee, I wish we had one of them doomsday machines.

How World War III became possible: A nuclear conflict with Russia is likelier than you think (SLVox).
posted by Cash4Lead at 10:38 AM - 106 comments

Being Disabled Means No Marriage Equality For Many People

Getting married means losing life saving services for many people with disabilities. "How do you tell a person to choose between having food to eat and getting married? How do you tell a person to choose between their medication or their therapy or their wheelchair or their program that helps them to be more independent and self-sufficient and getting married?"
posted by stoneweaver at 10:32 AM - 51 comments

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