July 24

Back to nature

Kate Kato is a designer who creates recycled paper models of the natural world. My favourites are her enhanced 3D books.
posted by jacquilynne at 7:10 AM - 0 comments

That time the Great Crown of England was pawned

In February 1338, the English Parliament approved a forced loan from Edward III's English subjects in support of his war against King Philip VI of France: 20,000 sacks of wool, which were to arrive in friendly Antwerp just before Edward landed with his troops in July. English wool, then the best in the world, could easily be converted into the gold needed to pay for troops and supplies. When Edward landed in Antwerp, his allies were there to greet him: The Duke of Brabant, the Count of Hainault, the Duke of Guelders, the Margrave of Juliers, and a host of lesser princes. But the wool wasn't. [more inside]
posted by clawsoon at 6:13 AM - 7 comments

I before E, except after... W?

Most kids who grow up speaking English learn the "I before E" rule, complete with its subparts "except after C" and "or when sounding like A". And some people learn some of the major exceptions, like "weird" and "height" and "caffeine" (so many exceptions, in fact, that as Stephen Fry and QI point out, the rule is essentially useless). But not many people go as far as Nathan Cunningham and use their programming skills to see whether C is really the letter that should be cited as the main exception. [more inside]
posted by Etrigan at 5:56 AM - 15 comments

Food for Soul

In the summer of 2015 Massimo Bottura, the acclaimed chef behind the three-Michelin-star restaurant Osteria Francescana, began a new project. Located in an abandoned theater in Milan, he invited artists and designers to transform the space into a welcoming place to share a meal. He also invited other world-class chefs like Rene Redzepi, Viviana Varies, Alex Atala, Ana Ros, Joan Roca and Daniel Humm to come create menus that changed daily. The result: Refettorio Ambrosiano. The mission: feed the hungry using food that would otherwise go to waste. [more inside]
posted by noneuclidean at 5:30 AM - 0 comments

Young Explorers

Follow Bejla and Tristan as they explore their world after recently mastering walking. [more inside]
posted by Stark at 5:21 AM - 0 comments

A New Canon: In Pop Music, Women Belong At The Center Of The Story

NPR offers a list of 150 albums by women that make up a new music canon. And they elucidate on the matter.
posted by hippybear at 3:24 AM - 27 comments

July 23

“...he used all my Guardian Arrows shooting at Bokoblins. ”

My Son Has Ruined Zelda: Breath Of The Wild by Mark Serrels [Kotaku] “A few details before I go into precisely how my son is ruining my Zelda game. A few answers to questions I suspect you might ask. Firstly why is my son playing Zelda? I dunno. It just happened and now it keeps happening. Secondly, why is he playing my game and not his own game? Simple answer: I’ve got all the cool power-ups and the cool weapons. His chances of actually inching his way through and earning those rewards at four years old are at monkeys writing Shakespeare odds at this point. Thirdly, why do I keep letting this happen? Love, ladies and Gentlemen. Love.”
posted by Fizz at 10:04 PM - 38 comments

"just as monstrous and mutant alge invade the lagoon of Venice"

Peter E. Gordon — The Authoritarian Personality Revisited: Reading Adorno in the Age of Trump, June 15, 2016.
My hope is that by reading Adorno again, we might discern how Trump at once instantiates the category of the “authoritarian personality” but also challenges its meaning. The AP study, I will suggest, contained two distinct lines of argument. The first of these arguments qualified as the “official” discovery of the research program, and its basic message is the one MacWilliams identified in the passages quoted above, namely, it claimed to have identified a new “psychological type.” The second argument was rather more sobering and radical in its implications: it suggested that the authoritarian personality signified not merely a type but rather an emergent and generalized feature of modern society as such.
[more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns at 9:03 PM - 10 comments

Brexit, Food & Sustainability.

Jay Rayner: “Michael Gove asked me to a meeting to share my expertise. I declined. Instead, I’ve given him a piece of my mind.” [more inside]
posted by lalochezia at 9:02 PM - 13 comments

New inexpensive iron catalyst converts CO2 to methane.

Visible-light-driven methane formation from CO2 with a molecular iron catalyst Doesn't seem like the efficiency is enough yet but seems promising.
posted by aleph at 8:54 PM - 11 comments

Not in a row!

Goats hug with their heads, according to yourdailygoats. This goat is prettier than most people, claims dailygoat. STOP WHAT YOU’RE DOING AND LOOK AT THIS HAPPY GOAT INSTEAD, demands daily-goat. Despite their names, none of these sites posts daily—Pbbbbbbbft! Goats previously.
posted by Johnny Wallflower at 4:02 PM - 23 comments

Not all eggs are egg-shaped

"Cracking the Mystery of Egg Shapes" Short graphic-rich description of a study of egg shape, with a software model in which the egg definitely came before the chicken.
posted by Quietgal at 3:24 PM - 7 comments

Sorry but ‘Sweetunia Orange Flash’ petunias will no longer be available.

In 2015, a plant biologist noticed some bright orange petunias near a train station in Helsinki which in May 2017 caused the USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service [APHIS] to confirm that numerous varieties of petunias were not properly registered as being genetically engineered (GE). [more inside]
posted by bCat at 1:54 PM - 14 comments

When and how Big Mike replaced Michael

In "The Life of a South Central Statistic," Danielle Allen wrangles with the life and death of her cousin, Michael. While she went on to receive two PhDs, he was convicted of robbery and attempted car jacking. When he was released, she tried to help him get a second chance. (This is an excerpt from Allen's forthcoming book, Cuz. )
posted by anotherpanacea at 7:47 AM - 14 comments

I know I want to be going flippity flop in the wind.

Balls Out: The Weird Story of the Great Truck Nuts War
posted by Evilspork at 5:19 AM - 107 comments

July 22

“Relief! Dread. Satisfaction. Emptiness. Excitement.”

Pushing The Edges Of Play: Lessons Learned From Making 100 Games In Five Years [Indie Games] “Developer James Earl Cox has recently completed his 100 Games in 5 Years, having wrapped up development of his taxing, rewarding journey with a cute game about a kitten in a blanket that likes to meow about things. Games about the horrors of war. Games about the horrors of getting caught watching porn. Games about racing fishmen, the well-mannered homeless, cows, sacred snails. Games about silliness, life, despair, world issues, and anything and everything in between. Cox's work has explored many, many different themes, as well as the scope of the developer's sense of purpose and humor. Now, at the end of the adventure, Cox is left to reflect on what's he gained from this undertaking, finding he's learned a great deal from working with so many different genres, ideas, and stories.”
posted by Fizz at 9:33 PM - 5 comments

Get That Monster Off The Stage

The story of Finbarr Donnelly and his bands Nun Attax, Five Go Down To the Sea? and Beethoven. [more inside]
posted by motty at 7:58 PM - 3 comments

Darkness falls across the land / The midnight hour is close at hand

Stranger Things 2 is on its way. [SLYT] [more inside]
posted by Harvey Kilobit at 7:56 PM - 122 comments

Stellar optimization

Wibbly-wobbly magnetic fusion stuff: The return of the stellarator
posted by the man of twists and turns at 5:22 PM - 14 comments

Mr. Slippery and Erythrina are not on the list

Everyone knows the correct name for a raccoon is Trash Panda, but did you know about Duck Puppies? And you can probably guess the common name for a Fart Squirrel without peeking, but how about a Land Cloud? Bread Moisturizer (not an animal)? Or my favorite, the Dogtor? A few more are here; check out @CorrectNames for the rest.
posted by Johnny Wallflower at 2:54 PM - 46 comments

HOT Wheels!

Do you like Hot Wheels cars? YouTube user baremetalHW does. On his channel, he does all sorts of restorations and customization of old, worn out toy cars, as well as tips and tricks for folks who might want to try it themselves. [more inside]
posted by pjern at 1:29 PM - 12 comments

This is the Night Mail crossing the border, bringing the cheque ...

"This is the Night Mail crossing the border, bringing the cheque and postal order." The traveling post office, the specially designed and operated mail-sorting train, was invented in 1838 and documented as Night Mail in 1936. The British short film has become a classic of its own kind, much imitated (and parodied) by adverts and modern film shorts. Night Mail is widely considered a masterpiece of the British Documentary Film Movement, and schoolchildren often memorize W.H. Auden’s “Night Mail,” the ending poem that was added as almost an afterthought.
posted by filthy light thief at 11:04 AM - 17 comments

Syria’s refugees are feeding the world

Food has always been at the heart of Syrian identity, and for nearly a million refugees that is true in a new, sharper way. When homes are destroyed and families scattered, food is a rare constant. It can also be a means of survival. For those who have lost jobs and professional status, cooking is an easily transferable skill, so conflict tends to spread cuisines.
~ source article
posted by infini at 9:47 AM - 12 comments

Who's a good dog? / Qui est un bon chien?

On Wednesday, the premiers of Canada's provinces, gathered for a meeting, held a press conference at the Hotel MacDonald in Edmonton. They were upstaged by Smudge, the hotel's "Canine Ambassador," who decided to photobomb the press conference. [more inside]
posted by mandolin conspiracy at 8:36 AM - 20 comments

Color Our Collections - Again!

#ColorOurCollections "is a week-long coloring fest organized by 107 libraries, archives, and other cultural institutions around the world. Using materials from their collections, these institutions are sharing free coloring content with the hashtag #ColorOurCollections and inviting their followers to color and get creative with their collections." [more inside]
posted by carter at 8:21 AM - 2 comments

Best Home Cooks of All Time (American)

How these cooks changed the way we cook and eat.
posted by MovableBookLady at 7:54 AM - 36 comments

The lane is built to help you.

Take 7 1/2 minutes to improve your bowling game with The hidden oil patterns on bowling lanes. Also, you should go bowling because it's fun.
posted by hippybear at 6:46 AM - 48 comments

July 21

Wet White Shirt

Jane Austen died 200 years ago this year. There are events planned. There are too many adaptations to list, though most will cite the BBC's production of Pride and Prejudice, starring Colin Firth in a wet white shirt. Australian improv artists and rappers Sense and Spontaneity pay tribute to the scene, which wasn't in the book, in Dear Mr. Darcy. Jane's portrait will soon feature on the British £10 note.
posted by adept256 at 9:51 PM - 34 comments

TAKE TRADEMARK REGISTRATIONS WITH A BOULDER OF SALT

Nintendo trademark suggests Nintendo 64 Classic Edition [Polygon] “Nintendo may be planning to release the next iteration of its “Classics” console series: the Nintendo 64, if recent European trademark filings from the company are any indication. On July 18, Nintendo filed four graphical trademarks with the European Union Intellectual Property Office. Each one is a simple piece of black-and-white line art, a 2D graphical representation of a Nintendo console or controller.”
posted by Fizz at 9:17 PM - 38 comments

😮

Brock is a very little boy who just discovered the joy of paint chip samples. [SLYT]
posted by Room 641-A at 5:32 PM - 27 comments

History doesn't repeat itself, but it rhymes

Sixty-odd years ago, at the height of the Cold War, the Australian Labor Party (a predominantly working class political party founded in the union movement, and with a large, largely Irish and Italian, Catholic constituency) was torn apart when a faction of social and religious conservatives, citing the threat of Communism, split off to form the Democratic Labor Party. Led by Catholic hardliner B.A. Santamaria, the DLP would keep the ALP in opposition for almost two decades, giving the (right of centre, and then predominantly mainstream Protestant) Liberal Party a long spell in office. Now, lead by Santamaria's intellectual heirs, the same thing may be happening again—this time to the Liberal Party. [more inside]
posted by acb at 5:18 PM - 17 comments

They're good wolves, Bront

Your dog is basically a super social wolf, and scientists may have found the gene that makes him want to cuddle with you. [more inside]
posted by Johnny Wallflower at 2:12 PM - 23 comments

So then Jada said, "Tiffany, what the hell is a Groupon?"

Comedian Tiffany Haddish tells Jimmy Kimmel about hanging out in New Orleans with Will and Jada Smith.
posted by Mchelly at 12:25 PM - 29 comments

Euron Greyjoy looks like a guy ...

Uproxx shares a list of 22 things Euron Greyjoy looks like.
posted by hanov3r at 11:50 AM - 43 comments

Lying to ourselves about mortality is what separates us from cats.

It's Okay to be a Coward about Cancer. Josh Friedman, tv writer and showrunner of the (late, beloved) tv series Terminator: the Sarah Connor Chronicles, shares some thoughts on dealing with cancer. Cancer doesn’t give a damn how tough you are. Cancer doesn’t care if you stared down the North Koreans, or won the Tour De France, or wrote two seasons of a scary robot show.
posted by suelac at 11:29 AM - 34 comments

A setup; a reveal; a slow Homeric smile.

You got the dud. You got the dud. You got the dud.

(Original Simpson's clip for context.)
posted by cortex at 11:28 AM - 18 comments

A treasure trove of electronic tunes from Aphex Twin and his aliases

Aphex Twin recently launched a countdown on his website. It began on the same day he performed at Field Day festival in London, where he sold a mysterious 12" and, for the first time in his career, live-streamed his set. And then he dropped the biggest bomb: an expanded collection of the Richard D. James releases since 1991, even pulling from some of his alternate alias side projects (AFX, Polygon Window, The Tuss, etc). You can buy FLAC or MP3s, or use the embedded streaming audio player with unlimited access to the entire catalog, and there's still more to come...
posted by filthy light thief at 11:01 AM - 20 comments

The moustache is still there and will be for centuries.

Salvador dali's moustache is still intact.
posted by storybored at 10:37 AM - 21 comments

Why Women Pretended to Be Creepy Rocks and Trees in NYC Parks During WWI

Imagine taking a quiet stroll through the expansive wilderness of Van Cortlandt Park in Bronx, New York. You’re surrounded by a forest of oak trees, stony ridges, and a tranquil lake—completely isolated and alone in nature. But in 1918, visitors to the 1,146-acre park were unaware that they were in the company of a group of women hiding among the rocks, trees, and grass. [more inside]
posted by twilightlost at 7:33 AM - 46 comments

Mathematical Paintings of Crockett Johnson

From 1965 until his death in 1975 Crockett Johnson painted over 100 works relating to mathematics and mathematical physics. Of these paintings, eighty are found in the collections of the National Museum of American History. We present them here, with related diagrams from the artist’s library and papers. [more inside]
posted by Wolfdog at 6:20 AM - 15 comments

Or at least those that a relatively well read American would know

The Most Iconic Books Set in 150 Countries Around the World is probably a deeply silly list, but perhaps fun to argue about on a Friday afternoon?
posted by MartinWisse at 6:01 AM - 82 comments

there is a reason it looks like pvc piping and couplings...

In 2002, the Science Museum of Minnesota absorbed the Museum of Questionable Medical Devices when the curator's health failed. Many of them are still on display, but even those of us unlucky enough to live far from St. Paul can still tour the museum virtually. Come see the foot-powered breast enlarger! Feast your eyes on the Prostate Gland Warmer! Marvel at the Timely Warning! But whatever you do, perhaps don't sample the delights of the Shoe-fitting X-Ray or the Relaxacisor.
posted by sciatrix at 5:08 AM - 32 comments

Big Pacific Behind The Scenes Filming Pufferfish Building A Nest

Take 15 minutes to watch "Chapter 1" of this Big Pacific episode "Behind The Scenes", wherein a film crew innovates ways to film a pufferfish building a nest to attract a female. I'm sorry there is no transcript, and I can't check for region blocking. [more inside]
posted by hippybear at 3:42 AM - 11 comments

Does “Fuel On Hand” Make Coal and Nuclear Power Plants More Valuable?

Does “fuel on hand,” stored onsite in substantial amounts, make fueled power stations somehow more resilient and valuable than other generators? It’s a good question with more claims than analysis, but historical experience may suggest useful insights. (Rocky Mountain Institute)
posted by flabdablet at 3:19 AM - 6 comments

July 20

“...keep them playing – and paying.”

Server Crashes, 40GB Patches and DLC: Gaming's Biggest Irritations Explained [The Guardian] “Video games have changed immeasurably since the days of tape loading and cover-mounted floppy discs. Today, we get lifelike 3D virtual worlds where the player can seamlessly connect with companions and opponents from every corner of the globe. An online triple-A title will now offer literally hundreds of hours of fun spread across years of play. Yet, inflation aside, the price we pay at the till remains the same now as it was 25 years ago. To make this possible, a lot of things have changed about the way the games industry works – but those changes haven’t always been well received. When problems arise, frustrated consumers will often blame “money-grubbing” publishers or “lazy” developers. But is that fair? We asked the industry to explain five of the most controversial aspects of modern games buying – and, crucially, why they happen. 1. Downloadable content 2. Season passes 3. Day-one patches 4. Pre-orders 5. Server crashes” [more inside]
posted by Fizz at 9:01 PM - 60 comments

The One Where Rachel Killed Everybody

A peculiar detail on this Friends DVD cover has Twitter exploding with conspiracy theories.
posted by Etrigan at 6:45 PM - 64 comments

"a love story between one woman and her vagina"

Yes, God, Yes is a 10 minute film by Karen Maine starring Natalia Dyer. It is based on Maine's experiences of growing up Catholic in the Midwest in the 1990s, and coming of age sexually in the age of America Online. Maine was interviewed by Marta Bausells about Yes, God, Yes in The Guardian.
posted by Kattullus at 5:54 PM - 3 comments

I want to be able to remember those stories and enjoy them while I can

The Heartbreaking Story Of A Man And His ‘68 Camaro - David Obuchowski
I ask him if his dad still knew about the Camaro in the end. He says he did, and they’d reminisce about it often.
“Oh, he’d get a kick out of it. We’d get a kick out of it when we’d talk about it. I’d say, ‘Remember, dad, when I was in the service, and I heard from my friends you were cruisin’ Main in it?’ And he’d laugh.”

posted by CrystalDave at 4:22 PM - 5 comments

The Lawyer, the Addict

The Lawyer, the Addict (New York Times). Tragic and thoughtful piece about one of the brightest stars in the Silicon Valley legal industry, drug abuse in the profession, and the mental health tolls of a professional culture of overworking.
posted by naju at 4:17 PM - 42 comments

Life Advice in Exchange for Potatoes

You Don't Have to Love your Body
posted by ThePinkSuperhero at 4:06 PM - 30 comments

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