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Lego urban decay in black and white
January 28, 2011 12:45 PM   Subscribe

Mike Doyle is making a series of intricate decayed Lego buildings. With irregular arrangements of bricks and careful choice of texture the results approach photorealism in black and white.

Two-storey with basement (the making of).

Three-storey Victorian with tree (Work in progress shots).

Via The Brothers Brick.
posted by Lorc (15 comments total) 26 users marked this as a favorite

 
Pretty sure this is a double.
posted by that's candlepin at 12:49 PM on January 28, 2011


Wasn't there a moratorium on "Detroit in decline" posts?
posted by M.C. Lo-Carb! at 12:51 PM on January 28, 2011 [3 favorites]


The photos are better quality this time. Wow, these are stunning.
posted by longsleeves at 12:55 PM on January 28, 2011


What the hell is up with grown ups and Lego? Plus all that would be way more impressive if he made it with real Lego, the 2X2, 2X4 and 2X8 only.

I recently became aware that tales of eight year olds making perfect scale representations of The Millennium Falcon weren't as impressive as I was giving them credit for as they buy kits with specialty shapes and instructions. Which seems the antithesis of what Lego is about, at least when I was a kid.

And yeah, get the hell off my lawn.
posted by Keith Talent at 12:56 PM on January 28, 2011 [2 favorites]


I have to give him credit for being able to conceptualize in his mind's eye what it is going to look like when he does that final b/w photo.. nice work
posted by HuronBob at 1:04 PM on January 28, 2011 [1 favorite]


HuronBob, I believe the photos themselves are full color. The lit backgrounds are color.

I'm pretty sure that it's the models themselves that are monochrome, which makes it even more impressive.
posted by loquacious at 1:30 PM on January 28, 2011 [1 favorite]


Amazing. Thanks for the post.
posted by Rock Steady at 1:30 PM on January 28, 2011


The fact that modern Lego has about sixteen different shades of gray makes this easier than it might have been in the 70's, yes.
posted by rokusan at 1:50 PM on January 28, 2011 [1 favorite]


The first building at least seems to have been done using white, black and transparent colourless bricks only.
posted by Lorc at 2:16 PM on January 28, 2011


Double or not, this is the most awesome Lego stuff I've ever seen. Thanks!
posted by Namlit at 2:22 PM on January 28, 2011


loquacious...ahhh..yes, of course... I think i assumed that because of the statement in the fpp.
posted by HuronBob at 5:06 PM on January 28, 2011


Gorgeous. Thanks, Lorc. This is what I come to MeFi for.
posted by Slithy_Tove at 6:53 PM on January 28, 2011


What the hell is up with grown ups and Lego? Plus all that would be way more impressive if he made it with real Lego, the 2X2, 2X4 and 2X8 only.

I recently became aware that tales of eight year olds making perfect scale representations of The Millennium Falcon weren't as impressive as I was giving them credit for as they buy kits with specialty shapes and instructions. Which seems the antithesis of what Lego is about, at least when I was a kid.


Shut up, seriously. I am so sick of hearing people get all bent out of shape because everything didn't stay magically preserved in amber, unchanging since you were 11.

There is an incredible amount of skill and work on display here and it pisses me off to see it casually dismissed by someone who won't be happy unless things are exactly how they used to be. Get over your childhood.
posted by Legomancer at 6:56 PM on January 28, 2011 [9 favorites]


I really like it! I love old Victorians, and I respect the ingenuity involved in making these projects.
posted by Katjusa Roquette at 12:00 AM on January 29, 2011


http://marcosbessa.blogspot.com/2011/02/en-mike-doyle-artist-of-moment.html

Recently posted interview with the creator.
posted by Lorc at 3:14 AM on February 5, 2011


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