Join 3,521 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)


Rapscallions ought not to challenge gifted rappers
February 13, 2011 12:36 AM   Subscribe

"What's Your English?" - A Youtube rhyme-off between the British Professor Elemental and the Canadian Baba Brinkman regarding the commonalities and differences between variations on the English language, courtesy of the Macmillan Dictionary. (Previous Brinkman, Previous Elemental)
posted by Katemonkey (24 comments total) 30 users marked this as a favorite

 
Fanned as flagtastic.
posted by hypersloth at 1:07 AM on February 13, 2011


english = usa imperialism.
posted by - at 1:42 AM on February 13, 2011


english = usa imperialism.

Without overthinking the matter, how about "no"?
posted by bicyclefish at 2:24 AM on February 13, 2011


They both pronunciation. There is no noun in pronunciation.
posted by pracowity at 2:27 AM on February 13, 2011 [1 favorite]


I lost a word in the editing. I meant to write that they both mispronounce pronunciation.
posted by pracowity at 2:30 AM on February 13, 2011


I've heard it said that Hinglish, an English creole spoken in India is the world's most common language now. One of my favourite things about Code 46 (and there were many) was the way the characters spoke a language based on English but containing words from many languages; to convey the idea that cultures had merged.
posted by alby at 2:31 AM on February 13, 2011


Motown. That is all I am typing.
posted by clavdivs at 2:40 AM on February 13, 2011


I laughed my rosy British arse off. Splendid stuff. Absolutely top hole. It warms the cockles to know we have a sterling cove like the professor holding the fort against the colonial barbarians!
posted by Decani at 4:16 AM on February 13, 2011 [1 favorite]


Upon first glance, I thought it was going to be an English professor. Upon re-reading, I thought I would be disappointed. The video proved me wrong on both counts. Thanks!
posted by speeb at 5:42 AM on February 13, 2011


Excuse me--I've got to go out and buy a Macmillan Dictionary.
posted by box at 6:18 AM on February 13, 2011


watching more baba brinkman now--neat!
posted by Potomac Avenue at 6:28 AM on February 13, 2011


As a Canadian living in England this is a FML rap video.

The funny part is that in my experience the portrayal is backwards. North Americans tend to be much more prescriptive about proper english than the British.
posted by srboisvert at 6:55 AM on February 13, 2011 [1 favorite]


It's funny, but the whole Brits as linguistic conservatives/Colonials as reformers of traditional English thing is a bit off. I don't remember where I heard this, but a group of linguists have reconstructed the Elizabethan English accent based on rhyme schemes in Shakespeare poems (among other things) and they determined that, if anything, American/Canadian English bears more resemblance to the English of the 1600s than modern-day British English.

Of course, that's not to say that the American/Canadian accent is exactly the same as it was 200 years ago. Both sound very different from the accent you'd hear in the 1600s. It's not like if you went back in a time machine you'd hear people in London and Jamestown all talking like a bunch of BBC newsreaders.
posted by Anyamatopoeia at 7:00 AM on February 13, 2011 [2 favorites]


Saith America: thanks, Canada! Between your good showing here and poutine, you've really earned your keep.

Sadly for you, though, there's no "Canadian English" option on the Macmillan website. Harrumph.
posted by kittyprecious at 7:22 AM on February 13, 2011


The Canadian's hands have an American accent.
posted by Jode at 7:39 AM on February 13, 2011


She's still alive!

Love!
posted by absalom at 7:52 AM on February 13, 2011


I don't remember where I heard this, but a group of linguists have reconstructed the Elizabethan English accent based on rhyme schemes in Shakespeare poems (among other things) and they determined that, if anything, American/Canadian English bears more resemblance to the English of the 1600s than modern-day British English.

See Smith Island, MD.
posted by empath at 8:13 AM on February 13, 2011 [1 favorite]


The funny part is that in my experience the portrayal is backwards. North Americans tend to be much more prescriptive about proper english than the British.
posted by srboisvert at 2:55 PM on February 13


That is indeed, the funny part. Or one of them.
posted by Decani at 9:35 AM on February 13, 2011


Canada never "declared independence." Getting a proper Queen was the best thing about taking Canadian citizenship.

There's barely a speck of "Canadian slang" in this video. Cute boys, though.
posted by ethnomethodologist at 10:20 AM on February 13, 2011


Anyamatopoeia: "I don't remember where I heard this, but a group of linguists have reconstructed the Elizabethan English accent based on rhyme schemes in Shakespeare poems (among other things) and they determined that, if anything, American/Canadian English bears more resemblance to the English of the 1600s than modern-day British English."

I remember hearing this too, and what I need now is a video of someone speaking in an accurate Elizabethan accent.
posted by danny the boy at 10:41 AM on February 13, 2011


These guys claim this is Shakespeare as his words were originally pronounced
posted by Comrade_robot at 10:50 AM on February 13, 2011


I am very impressed the duality is presented as U.K. versus Canadian English-speakers.
posted by joeclark at 1:01 PM on February 13, 2011


Comrade Robot, so Shakespeare had an Irish accent?
posted by MrBobaFett at 8:16 AM on February 14, 2011


Awesome, thanks for the video. That was my first thought too... "huh, this just sounds like the Irish Springs guy"

jk
posted by danny the boy at 11:57 AM on February 14, 2011


« Older That's Life...  |  Algeria has shut down internet... Newer »


This thread has been archived and is closed to new comments