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July 11, 2011 5:33 PM   Subscribe

Gospel singer Herman Cain's album "Sunday Morning" is now available online. In the fifteen years since the album was originally released the singer and baptist preacher has also found success in the business world, broadcasting, and politics.
posted by furiousxgeorge (12 comments total) 2 users marked this as a favorite

 
Let the Eagle Soar
posted by East Manitoba Regional Junior Kabaddi Champion '94 at 5:54 PM on July 11, 2011 [1 favorite]


I was getting all ready to be like "you know, that's not half bad!" But then I listened to it and, yeah, it's more than half bad.
posted by The World Famous at 5:59 PM on July 11, 2011 [4 favorites]


The Note Is Too Damned High Party
posted by Trurl at 6:00 PM on July 11, 2011 [18 favorites]


While I am super excited to listen to this masterful recording I am curious what success he has had in politics?
posted by munchingzombie at 6:35 PM on July 11, 2011 [2 favorites]


Let the Eagle Soar

To think what kind of alternate reality we would live in if politics didn't push people into careers as permanent assholes.
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 6:46 PM on July 11, 2011


I was going to say that I don't listen to music sung by anyone who sells crappy pizza, but I do admire the oeuvre of The Rock-afire Explosion.
posted by Faint of Butt at 6:53 PM on July 11, 2011


I would count this as a success.

The Clintons would later blame "Harry and Louise," the fictional couple in the ads aired by the insurance industry, for undermining health reform. But the real saboteurs are named Herman and John. Herman Cain is the president of Godfather's Pizza and president-elect of the National Restaurant Association. An articulate black entrepreneur, Cain transformed the debate when he challenged Clinton at a town meeting in Kansas City, Mo., last April. Cain asked the president what he was supposed to say to the workers he would have to lay off because of the cost of the "employer mandate." Clinton responded that there would be plenty of subsidies for small businessmen, but Cain persisted. "Quite honestly, your calculation is inaccurate," he told the president. "In the competitive marketplace it simply doesn't work that way."

The switchboard at Godfather's was lit up with supportive calls. It was as if the small business community -- a very large and politically powerful group -- had been told to march on Washington. Cain, said Larry Neal, an aide to Sen. Phil Gramm, "was the lightning rod."


He has also had some high profile advisory positions. If your definition of success is "get elected to anything" than none. :P
posted by furiousxgeorge at 6:54 PM on July 11, 2011


An articulate black entrepreneur

Really, Newsweek?
posted by Condroidulations! at 8:02 PM on July 11, 2011 [5 favorites]


Newsweek then went on to discuss how black people do healthcare like THIS, and white people do healthcare like THIS.
posted by murphy slaw at 8:04 PM on July 11, 2011 [1 favorite]


Argh, I know that one is a dog whistle but I do really think the guy has above average speaking talent form his radio and preaching experience. (And his music career!)
posted by furiousxgeorge at 8:04 PM on July 11, 2011


Wow, an actual producer; running for a political office?
posted by buzzman at 8:06 PM on July 11, 2011


I'm sure all MeFites would agree that there's nothing more horrible than a successful, talented, articulate black man that also happens to be conservative. I mean, shit, next thing you know he'll be erecting burning crosses. You know, like his good friend and fellow conservative and Republican Robert Byrd.
posted by CountSpatula at 7:37 PM on July 12, 2011


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