Skip

Orange you glad you got your Nickelodeon?
July 25, 2011 1:33 PM   Subscribe

Two and a half years ago, we explored the early history of Cartoon Network... but it wasn't the only player in the youth television game. As a matter of fact, Fred Seibert -- the man responsible for the most inventive projects discussed in that post -- first stretched his creative legs at the network's truly venerable forerunner: Nickelodeon. Founded as Pinwheel, a six-hour block on Warner Cable's innovative QUBE system, this humble channel struggled for years before Seibert's innovative branding work transformed it into a national icon and capstone of a media empire. Much has changed since then, from the mascots and game shows to the versatile orange "splat." But starting tonight in response to popular demand, the network is looking back with a summer programming block dedicated to the greatest hits of the 1990s, including Hey Arnold!, Rocko's Modern Life, The Adventures of Pete & Pete, The Ren & Stimpy Show, Double Dare, Are You Afraid of the Dark?, Legends of the Hidden Temple, and All That. To celebrate, look inside for the complete story of the early days of the network that incensed the religious right, brought doo-wop to television, and slimed a million fans -- the golden age of Nickelodeon. (warning: monster post inside)

PART 1: The Early Years
Nick started out as a young children's program called Pinwheel that mixed puppetry and live action with animated shorts from overseas. Only a few bootlegs survive from this era, making video hard to track down.

As the nascent channel struggled to find an audience, it started rerunning episodes of the Canadian comedy show You Can't Do That On Television!, which proved to be a big hit and laid the groundwork for future variety shows like it once the network found its legs. The show also introduced the infamous green slime that would characterize the network's later game show programs. Semi-active fansite YCDTOTV.com provides official recipes, and is positively overflowing with other content about this era.

PART 2: "From Worst to First"
Fred Seibert arrived at Nickelodeon fresh from success at MTV, where he and colleague Alan Goodman had developed the iconic "Man on the Moon" sequence that launched the channel in 1981. The Fred/Alan team found Nickelodeon floundering, hemorrhaging millions of dollars and dead last in the ratings.

Their solution: a complete re-branding, starting with the logo. Out went the clunky silver balloon, in came The Splat. Inspired by MTV's shifting psychedelic design, The Splat was an all-purpose wonder, an amorphous blob of bright orange gunk that could be anything and everything. Using fun style guides, producers applied the Nick name to bones, rocket ships, dinosaurs, and dozens of other forms across hundreds of products over the next few decades. The logo was so versatile, in fact, that it went through only one major revision (blog post; guide) before Viacom, in the way of all corporate giants, dispensed with The Splat in 2009 for a new unified brand -- one very similar, ironically enough, to the logo that saddled the network in its infancy.

To introduce Nick's new brand, Seibert and Goodman contracted with dozens of artists to create a series of striking and innovative "bumpers" all showcasing the bright orange Splat. Perhaps the most fortuitous hire was a capella band The Jive Five. As Seibert explains in his article "The Doo-Wopping of Television":
Alan's former colleague, writer and producer Marty Pekar, had started Ambient Sound to capture contemporary recordings of classic doo-wop groups from the 50s and 60s. He introduced them to the leader of The Jive 5, Eugene Pitt, as "not only a great singer, but a smart man." They found Eugene to be, as Rock and Roll Hall of Fame CEO Terry Stewart said, "the most underrated soul singer in America," and a wonderful collaborator. When the opportunity to work with Nickelodeon presented itself, Fred, Alan, and producer Tom Pomposello immediately knew the Jive 5 would be the perfect underpinning for defining the vocabulary of the network.

Convincing Nickelodeon was another story. [...] Fred/Alan tried a lot of arguments to bring them around to a doo-wop sound, but they fell on deaf ears. "Doo-wop's 30 years old, no kid has ever heard of it."

We won the day on two grounds. Fred played on the executives' liberal backgrounds. "We love all forms of African-American music, and using doo-wop will be a great way to educate American kids without anyone being the wiser."

Alan's worked even better. He opened his mouth and, quoting The Marcels' arrangement of chestnut "Blue Moon," sang: "Bom-ma-bom, a-bom-bom-a-bom, ba-ba-bom-bom-a-bomp, b-dang-a-dang-dang, b-ding-a-dong-ding."

"What kid isn’t going to relate to that right away?" Alan asked. Case closed.
The Jive Five proceeded to record a number of joyful and infectiously catchy doo-wop melodies for the artists to animate in a wide variety of styles, spots that went on to form the core of the channel's new identity (and the first of which became the its enduring theme song):
N-Nick Nick Nick N-Nick Nick Nick... Nickelodeon! (Main Theme) - Hon De Laud Hup Hivvel Up Nick (Calling Cades MasterMix) - Orange you glad you got your Nickelodeon? (Fruit variant) - Bulldog Crew (Jungle) - Tweedley Dum (Space Beans) - Shoo Be Doo (Worms) - It's Time, It's Time (Haircut) - Say Hey Say Hi Say Ho (Skating) - Better Off By Far (Space) - Waiting for You (Fish) - Dino Bop - Doo-Wop-a-Saurus - Your TV Network (Jive Five) - Top of the Hour - Easy Groove - Alligator and Frog - Dragon and Frog - Full Montage
The campaign was a tremendous, CLIO award-winning success -- within six months Nickelodeon had rocketed to the number one slot on the ratings chart. And the doo-wop was just the beginning -- that first batch inspired a wider range of spots in later years, from the cute to the bizarre:
Pinchface - Bone - Picnic Ants - Big Beast Quintet - Nicktoons Blob - Scissors Man - Opera - Reggae - Toothbrush Morph - Monkey Balloon - Dancing Dogs - Monster Disco - Banner - Around the World - Waiter - Laundry - Rock Dance - Teacup - What You Want claymation - Doug - Spelling - Barnyard - Comet - Flying Chair - Origami - Asian ID - Sea Monster - Box Face - Stage - Cave Paintings - Octopus - Tractor - Head on Chair - Windshield - Lockers - Rugrats - Gymnastics - Nick Takes Over Your School - Compilation (with lots more) - Shorts: Inside-Out Boy and Angela Anaconda
A Maine summer camp was even invited to submit student-created bumpers, which turned into a fun campaign of its own.

PART 3: Nickelodeon Studios

Years of sustained success led to the 1990 foundation of Nickelodeon Studios, a combination film studio, animation mecca, and theme park at Universal Studios in Orlando. The studio, with its colorful facade and infamous Slime Geyser, would become the nerve center of the company and a backdrop for many programs throughout the next decade, especially game shows like Double Dare, the notoriously difficult Legends of the Hidden Temple obstacle course (which you can attempt yourself!), and Global GUTS with its imposing Aggro Crag.

The network also developed spin-offs and sister channels, such as Nick Jr. (full of colorful fare like Face and Gullah Gullah Island for the toddler set) and Nick at Nite, which featured reruns of popular sitcoms from decades past (which, if you think about it, is basically what this '90s programming block is doing right now -- oh noes!).

Sadly, the studios closed its doors in 2005 in the face of flagging attendance, storm damage, and staff relocations to other offices. The building still stands, but all has been stripped away, including the Geyser and the studio time capsule (reburied at a company resort talked about previously). Gone, but not forgotten, though -- enjoy this thorough behind-the-scenes guided tour of the facility from before the closure by a former employee.

PART 4: Live Action

The Nick Studio was home to many live action programs, from sitcoms to horror to variety shows (and Stick Stickly!):

Two early sitcoms, Hey Dude and Clarissa Explains it All, have been given full retrospectives by the AV Club, while fan favorite The Adventures of Pete & Pete is getting an episode-by-episode review. Speaking of which, don't miss the full version of "Hey Sandy," the great theme song by Polaris that carried some surprisingly dark undertones, or this original short uploaded by Fred Seibert. As for the cast, where are they now?

Horror series Are You Afraid of the Dark? went through several incarnations, many episodes of which can be found online. Brave the list of scariest episodes (or TVTropes' High Octane Nightmare Fuel page for the show) ...if you dare.

And of course there were the two big variety shows, both the work of Dan Schneider ("the Norman Lear of children’s television"). Each were modeled on the earlier YCDTOT -- the SNL-lite All That and spin-off Kenan & Kel (both of which helped propel star Kenan Thompson to actual SNL stardom). The nature of the shows makes video more scattered, but there's plenty to take in; this 100+ video playlist is a good start, as is the TVTropes page.

(And lest we forget: Camp Anawanna, Alex Mack, Cousin Skee-- well, you can probably forget that one.)

For the cynics out there: The Nostalgia Critic's skeptical 18-minute mocking of the above (except for Pete & Pete, which he loves unconditionally).

PART 5: Nicktoons

Of course, the most well-known Nick properties were their many original animated series, or Nicktoons. A ToonZone member explains their genesis:
Sometime in 1989, at the Montclair, New Jersey house of Nick president Geraldine Laybourne, Laybourne, her husband Kit, Herb Scannell, Fred Seibert, and others had a meeting where they watched TV shows currently running at the time and compared them to classic shorts such as the Looney Tunes. They came to the conclusion that then-current animation from studios such as DIC and Hanna-Barbera was formulaic and had no unique style. Geraldine Laybourne believed that the best characters, such as Mickey Mouse, Bugs Bunny, and Kermit the Frog, were those characters who were linked to their creator. Laybourne and the team decided that the creator should be the one who was the center of the production, just as it was in the old days. Also, having a library of animated shows that they owned would allow them to both prevent having to license other animation and make money for the network- and also eventually make back the high cost of producing original animation, since animation is costly to produce, but has a long shelf life.

It was an expensive and laborious project- around $12 million in total ($1 to $2 million per pilot) to commission eight pilots, of which they hoped four would be able to air as an animated block with a target date of August 1991.
Only three of the eight made made it through to production: Doug, Rugrats, and the wonderfully edgy Ren & Stimpy. The success of these inspired others throughout the next decade, including:
Rocko's Modern Life, whose first season is on review at AV Club

Hey Arnold!, whose main voice actress (for Helga) recently did an informative Q&A over at Reddit

Kablam!, the comics-inspired variety animation show with one catchy theme song ("Two Tone Army" by The Toasters)

The ongoing Spongebob Squarepants juggernaut, whose first few seasons could be pretty twisted

Invader Zim (lots of episodes here), whose twistedness was a little more obvious

And of course plenty of Mefites are familiar with the artistry and good storytelling of Avatar (no, not the 3D one)
One notable project was Seibert's Oh Yeah! Cartoons, an innovative series of one-off creator-driven shorts that would inspire later work on Cartoon Network's World Premiere Toons series (which in turn led to programs like Dexter's Lab and Powerpuff Girls, discussed here). There's a full list of shorts to peruse on Wikipedia -- many are on YouTube, but far to many to post here. Seibert himself has put a lot of media from the show on the web, like multiple 100+ page books of art from his Frederator Studios, which helmed the project and now makes series like Adventure Time. Don't miss the ongoing 16-part history of the studio (full table of contents are only in that last post). Also interesting, if unrelated, is Seibert's collection of media from his time at Hanna-Barbera in the early '90s. If you want more (lots more), check out Jerry Beck's Not Just Toons: Nicktoons! or Heather Hendershot's more scholarly Nickelodeon Nation.

(The Nostalgia Critic is slightly more tolerant of the 'toons)

PART 6: Nickelodeon Magazine

For years, Nick promoted subscriptions to Nickelodeon Magazine, its flagship print product with a peak circulation of more than seven million. Interestingly, while the magazine was largely concerned with pranks and jokes and celebrity interviews, it was also a haven for the underground comix scene, featuring work from cartooning luminaries like Kim Deitch and Craig Thompson, whose works were popular enough to justify periodic all-comic specials and support award programs and convention events. As cartoonist Rod McKie described his first read through an issue:
So, having heard good things about Nickelodeon Magazine (US), I decided to get a hold of the thing and go over it with a fine tooth-comb, and try to think my way into the thing. The thing was, I had no idea what to expect, it was a kids magazine after all. Well, I was astonished when I saw it, really astonished. I'm not kidding, I was really bowled over by the magazine, I had never seen a publication more visually literate, more cartoon and illustration friendly, it was a cartoonist's delight. [...] I found myself responding to it with the same levels of wonder and delight as a cartoonist, as a parent, and as a teacher. I had never seen anything like this, and I had never seen such a range of mainstream and indie cartoonists all gathered together in one publication.
Though the magazine unfortunately folded in 2009, information and art from its many features can still be found on the web:

Fiona of the Felines by Terry LaBan - Grampa and Julie: Shark Hunters by Jef Czekaj - Impy & Wormer by James Kochalka - Juanita and Clem by Craig Thompson - Mervin the Magnificent by Richard Sala - Patty-Cake by Scott Roberts - Sam Hill & Ray-9 by Mark Martin - Scene But Not Heard by Sam Henderson - Southern Fried Fugitives by Simon and Kim Deitch - Teeny Weeny, the Tiniest Hot Dog in the World by Mark Martin - The Uncredibly Confabulated Tales of Lucinda Ziggles by Andy Ristaino - Underpants-On-His-Head Man by Michael Kupperman - Yam by Corey Barba

Lots more material in the unofficial Nickmag-Comics LiveJournal site, or browse an old issue at Archive.org.

PART 7: Nick News

In 1992, the channel hired respected journalist Linda Ellerbee to helm Nick News, a new educational program meant to air periodically in classrooms and in primetime. The show gained renown (and eventually won a Peabody and an Edward R. Murrow Award) for tackling difficult and complex issues like AIDS and global warming in a frank way, taking its young audience seriously and relying heavily on interviews with kids and teens to explore their problems and concerns. Politically aware, the program's regular "Kids Pick the President" mock election correctly called five of the last six winners (save Kerry in 2004).

Perhaps the most notable episode of the show was the controversial 2002 special report "My Family is Different" (discussed previously), which dealt with same-sex parentage and attendant issues such as sexual harassment and hate crimes. In a time when homosexuality enjoyed far weaker public support in America, Ellerbee's earnest and nonjudgmental take on the subject provoked bitter outrage from conservative groups, who pledged to boycott Nickelodeon in retaliation. The episode, the show's highest-rated, went on to win a GLAAD Media Award for Outstanding Television Journalism.

The show's still going strong, most recently covering the long-term consequences of the Haiti earthquake.

PART 8: Nick Movies

In its heyday, the company produced original live-action movies, such as Harriet the Spy (1996) and Good Burger (1997), in addition to adaptations of its animated stable. It later branched out into producing big screen versions of other works, from A Series of Unfortunate Events and Nacho Libre to Rango and the terrible M. Night Shyamalan version of beloved Nicktoon Avatar (The Last Airbender).

PART 9: SPECIAL MUSICAL BONUS!!

An official "Best of Nicktoons" CD featuring a random assortment of earwormy tunes from across the network; available for download here or with selected tracks on YouTube:

Nick Nick Nick (Main Theme) - 3D Laughing Boy Open - Rugrats Theme - Nick Video Open - Kablam! Theme - Thunder Girl - Nick-o-Las Tell Underture - Ren & Stimpy Theme - Happy Happy Joy Joy - Log Commercial - Calling Cades - Aaahh!! Real Monsters Theme - Artman Open - Angry Beavers Theme - I Think I Like You - Hey Arnold! Theme - Haunted Train Blues - Darling You Left My Heart - Look Up! - Simple Things - Rocko's Modern Life Theme - Orange You Glad? - CatDog Theme

And what musical bonus is complete without a little amateur a capella?

PART 10: It all comes back

For the foreseeable future, rotating blocks of the old shows are now set to air weeknights at midnight EST on sister network TeenNick, starting with All That, Kenan & Kel, Clarissa Explains It All, and Doug. If you're not a fan of those, changes will be made to the schedule in response to feedback online through Facebook, Twitter, and other social media channels. Also, regular marathons of the old animated shows run overnight on fellow sister network Nicktoons at the same time, offering some variety for anybody who wants it.
posted by Rhaomi (116 comments total) 255 users marked this as a favorite

 
Note: I've been gathering the content in this post for literally years off and on, since at least 2009, always meaning to post it eventually, but never getting around to turning the growing bookmark folder full of links into a coherent post. The Cartoon Network post was the inspiration -- it's so fun rediscovering old clips and shorts and sharing them with others who grew up with them too -- but this ended up being tougher because Nick just had so many more things going on than CN did. I tried using certain dates like the anniversary of the network as a deadline to motivate; it never quite did it. But I figure once a decades-old TV channel gets around to dusting off its media collection, I should probably try, too.

Special thanks to the YouTubers who collected and labeled most of the videos in the post in a couple of easy-to-find places, and especially to Fred Seibert for not only making so many great shows possible but for documenting the process so thoroughly that anybody could go back and see how it all happened and share that story with others.

posted by Rhaomi at 1:35 PM on July 25, 2011 [10 favorites]


every now and again i catch myself singing the pinwheel intro song.
posted by fuzzypantalones at 1:35 PM on July 25, 2011 [10 favorites]


So who wants to just give Rhaomi a doctorate in Historical Cultural Studies?
posted by The Whelk at 1:37 PM on July 25, 2011 [29 favorites]


Rhaomi, it is posts like this that make me curse the ephemeral nature of the web. Because decades from now someone will find this post, and by then Youtube will have vanished and all the links will be dead, and this work of scholarship will be lost forever instead of archived the way it should be. But bravo, anyway.
posted by PercussivePaul at 1:38 PM on July 25, 2011 [5 favorites]


But... but... but I had things to do.
posted by griphus at 1:38 PM on July 25, 2011 [8 favorites]


Well I guess I'm done with work for the day...

On preview: Ditto griphus
posted by fishmasta at 1:39 PM on July 25, 2011


I was thinking about making a separate post about this, but didn't really have enough supporting material, so I'm just going to leave it here: SDCC brought the first trailer for Korra, the Avatar sequel: The Last Airbender: Legend of Korra.

It's so awesome it hurts. The wait is going to be unbearable. Some more info here.
posted by kmz at 1:39 PM on July 25, 2011 [9 favorites]


Command F "Salute Your Shorts", Command W.
posted by nathancaswell at 1:40 PM on July 25, 2011 [4 favorites]


Also, one of the few genuinely pleasant memories I have of my mother is watching Angry Beavers with her.
posted by griphus at 1:40 PM on July 25, 2011 [2 favorites]


I've never watched Pete & Pete, but Summerbaby is a great song.
posted by zamboni at 1:42 PM on July 25, 2011


This is awesome. I also wanted to throw "Turkey TV" on the pile, as related to You Can't Do That On Television. (I had such a 12-year-old crush on Moose and Lisa.) I think Turkey TV is where I first heard of Norman Gunston and maybe even Uncle Floyd.
posted by not_on_display at 1:45 PM on July 25, 2011 [3 favorites]


YCDTOT, Zim, Sponge Bob, so many memories.
posted by nomisxid at 1:46 PM on July 25, 2011


The actuarial tables say I won't live long enough to view all of the content in this post. Nevertheless, wow!
posted by tommasz at 1:46 PM on July 25, 2011


My earliest memory of Nickelodeon, I believe from when it first went on air, is of Ride of the Valkyries - playing for a long time - over pop art style comics. Does this ring a bell with anyone else? I think they were pretty desperate for content early on.
posted by jmccw at 1:47 PM on July 25, 2011


Or was it HBO? Arrgh...
posted by jmccw at 1:48 PM on July 25, 2011


Looking at the Logo transformations is like watching a brilliant person be squished into a box. The superior ones on the left are almost self-evident, making you wonder what the hell people are thinking.
posted by jscott at 1:49 PM on July 25, 2011


why is there no flag for Dropped To Ground Screaming Helplessly Before The Sight Of My Childhood Laid Bare Before Me
posted by Greg Nog at 1:51 PM on July 25, 2011 [30 favorites]


I have never gotten so many songs stuck in my head in such rapid succession before.

Thanks for posting this. It is amazing.
posted by FAMOUS MONSTER at 1:51 PM on July 25, 2011 [1 favorite]


Between 1988-90, my brother and I had our faces glued to Nickelodeon.

Out Of Control, Turkey TV, Double Dare, Finders Keepers, YCDTOTV, Salute Your Shorts, Pete & Pete, and Ren & Stimpy were our household favorites.
posted by herbplarfegan at 1:52 PM on July 25, 2011 [2 favorites]


Oh, how I loved Rocko's Modern Life. The best episodes could easily hold their own against your typical Adult Swim lineup.
posted by a small part of the world at 1:53 PM on July 25, 2011 [1 favorite]


Prometheus and Bob? Dear god brain why did you choose to hold on to that and not say, the names of any of my friends growing up?
posted by The Whelk at 1:55 PM on July 25, 2011 [2 favorites]


I really want to see the Adoption episode of YCDTOTV. The story is that apparently the copy Nickelodeon had has a label stating "DO NOT PLAY."
posted by Mister Fabulous at 1:56 PM on July 25, 2011 [1 favorite]


every now and again i catch myself singing the pinwheel intro song.

Ditto. I've found that memories of 80s and early 90s Nickelodeon bind our generation as few other things do.
posted by Rangeboy at 1:56 PM on July 25, 2011


Agreed, Greg Nog. For one of the first times in my young life, I sense the incredible distance between now and my childhood. I figured I had at least until I hit thirty...
posted by incomple at 1:56 PM on July 25, 2011


Here's me in 1986 as a 12-year-old Nickelodeon contest winner. I entered to try to win the grand prize of a trip to the set of YCDTOTV (thus eliminating the one chance I had in my life to meet Alanis Morissette and inspire a terrible song), but ended up serving a half day as the Mayor of Salt Lake City, Utah instead.

In case you were curious, it wasn't just a ceremonial position. I negotiated a no-gum-chewing policy for SLC cops with the three-year-old Chief of Police. And I got to say the tag line on the commercial, "Kids' Day... on Nickelodeon!"

Oh, and I got to meet Dangermouse. That was cool.
posted by GamblingBlues at 1:56 PM on July 25, 2011 [6 favorites]


Also, zamboni, do yourself a huge favor and watch Pete and Pete. This isn't just misty-eyed nostalgia; the show really does hold up over time.
posted by Rangeboy at 1:57 PM on July 25, 2011 [1 favorite]


I found Pinwheel strangely disturbing; for some reason Aurelia especially terrified me. The other stuff though, was fantastic.

Rocko's Modern Life: my brother and I can still crack each other up mentioning a line from that show.
posted by dubold at 1:59 PM on July 25, 2011


....You Can't Do That On Television is great and all that (and okay, I had a major crush on Alasdair), but anyone else have any love for some of the other early shows like Danger Mouse or Belle and Sebastian?
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 1:59 PM on July 25, 2011 [6 favorites]


Oh man, that "where are they now" link for Pete and Pete brought up some awesome memories. That show was so weirdly awesome.

Thanks for this post!
posted by hopeless romantique at 2:00 PM on July 25, 2011


Loved loved loved the Adventures of Pete and Pete. When Arrested Development came along, that was the show I always tried to use as a reference when describing it to my friends (who generally a) had no idea what I was talking about, and b) then didn't watch AD. Philistines.)

Meanwhile, how could a post so jaw-droppingly comprehensive leave out the Talk Blaster Telephone? It played the Nick Doo-wop theme, mooed like a cow, and exploded into maniacal laughter while the neon zigzag on top flashed. I bought two of these. One for us, and one because my mom saw it at our house and decided she needed one too. My ex snagged ours in the divorce. But my parents' is still going strong. And every time I visit, my hands get all my-precious-y over it.
posted by Mchelly at 2:01 PM on July 25, 2011 [1 favorite]


I remember The Tomorrow People (think the X-_Men by way of Classic Doctor Who) on Nickelodeon back in the day. That and the music concert show on Saturday afternoons (Adam Ant! Bow Wow Wow!) had me convinced that the UK was the awesomest place to live in the 80's.
posted by KingEdRa at 2:02 PM on July 25, 2011 [2 favorites]


Alexis Krauss of Sleigh Bells was in that Nickelodeon Magazine commercial that was on forever, by the way.

Also, Jewel Staite (Firefly's Kaylee) was Catalina on Space Cases.
posted by griphus at 2:02 PM on July 25, 2011 [1 favorite]


Meanwhile, how could a post so jaw-droppingly comprehensive leave out the Talk Blaster Telephone? It played the Nick Doo-wop theme, mooed like a cow, and exploded into maniacal laughter while the neon zigzag on top flashed.

Oh, man -- they also made an alarm clock that did that. My best friend had one for a while because "it's so fucking annoying that you can't help but wake up."

This was over ten years ago, however, and I have a feeling it has long been smashed into splinters by now.
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 2:03 PM on July 25, 2011 [1 favorite]


This is post makes my heart sing with glee.
posted by andreaazure at 2:04 PM on July 25, 2011


Oh, man -- they also made an alarm clock that did that. My best friend had one for a while because "it's so fucking annoying that you can't help but wake up."

No one seems to have uploaded the original, but a kid was kind enough to recreate the entire "Scream In a Box" September fool's fake commercial.

And I will always kick myself for only saving the audio from the "Fleminem - Without Meat" video. Eminem seems to have managed to actually keep something off the internet =(
posted by nomisxid at 2:08 PM on July 25, 2011


I still remember hiding behind the couch during the scary parts of Are You Afraid of the Dark? And The Tale of the Captured Souls (YT 1/3; full ep on MySpace) has been one of my mental shortcuts, the idea of photos and such stealing a bit of your life popping back into my head every so often, over the past 19 years.
posted by filthy light thief at 2:11 PM on July 25, 2011


My fondest memory of Nickelodeon was waking up at 6AM every day for a year or two (while it was in that timeslot, maybe 1988-1990?) to watch back-to-back episodes of Mr. Wizard's World. Thanks, Don Herbert. I believe Pinwheel was (for a while) the show before Mr Wizard.

After it was over at 7AM I went back upstairs and napped until my mom woke me up to go to elementary school.
posted by SirOmega at 2:16 PM on July 25, 2011 [10 favorites]


Pete and Pete rules. And All That was more consistently funny at the time, in my opinion, than Saturday Night Live.
posted by Gelatin at 2:16 PM on July 25, 2011


And in regards to the New York Times question: Are 18- to 34-year-olds too young to be nostalgic? No, but not everything pulls up the same sense of longing for the past. Example: watching many of the live-actions shows that included laugh-tracks make me cringe, kind of like reading my old journals from junior high. Sure, that's how I felt at the time, but do I want to re-live it? Nope, I'm happy to have moved on.
posted by filthy light thief at 2:18 PM on July 25, 2011


I was a little too old for this all to be part of my childhood..instead it was part of my guilty pleasure-seeking young adulthood. Thank you Rhaomi.

(though I will never understand the appeal of the hideously deformed Rugrat children).
posted by emjaybee at 2:23 PM on July 25, 2011


This post makes me feel old, if only that it skips over my favorite Nick anthology series growing up.
posted by eyeballkid at 2:25 PM on July 25, 2011


First show I ever watched on cable was Danger Mouse. I remember my Dad calling out the front door that the cable is ready, the cable is ready soon followed by a mad dash as me and my friends tore down the street to my house. We had to sit through a brief lecture about how to use "the clicky box" but after that, we got to hasten the transformation of our brains to a sweet, sweet ooze.
posted by robocop is bleeding at 2:25 PM on July 25, 2011 [1 favorite]


Also, zamboni, do yourself a huge favor and watch Pete and Pete.

Absolutely, if only for the spectacle of a school bus driver shrieking "CARROT-TOPPED JUDAS! Thou hast forsaken meeeeeeeeee!"
posted by Mr. Bad Example at 2:25 PM on July 25, 2011 [3 favorites]


Previously.
posted by infinitewindow at 2:30 PM on July 25, 2011


Thanks so much for this – was just reminiscing about Hey Dude a few days ago (I have a lost album of live action nick theme song covers somewhere I should dig up). Spent a good chunk of time cycling through those network IDs.
posted by CharlesV42 at 2:31 PM on July 25, 2011


Also.
posted by infinitewindow at 2:31 PM on July 25, 2011


> My fondest memory of Nickelodeon was waking up at 6AM every day for a year or two (while it was in that timeslot, maybe 1988-1990?) to watch back-to-back episodes of Mr. Wizard's World.

This, YCDTOTV, and Pete & Pete composed an amazing amount of my childhood. Especially since I could only watch TV not on school nights (oh, summertime was AWESOME then).

I had a chance to drink bourbon with Little Pete when he was at Hampshire College, really chill guy, but didn't have much else to say other than "thanks for the bourbon" because I wasn't going to say "OMG YOU'RE LITTLE PETE."
posted by mrzarquon at 2:32 PM on July 25, 2011


I miss "The Third Eye."
posted by andreaazure at 2:33 PM on July 25, 2011 [4 favorites]


no nick jr? dora the explorer? blue's clues? little bear?

i have a 15 year old daughter - do the math ...
posted by pyramid termite at 2:36 PM on July 25, 2011


THIRD EYE! NOSTALGIA BOMB!
Under the Mountain
also the haunting of cassie palmer, Children of the Stones, Into the Labyrinth . . .
posted by exlotuseater at 2:37 PM on July 25, 2011 [2 favorites]


For those like me who had a childhood crush on Moose, she kept a blog for a while, where she talks about a buncha interesting stuff.
posted by Afroblanco at 2:37 PM on July 25, 2011 [1 favorite]


It's like 1993 and I'm sitting on the memory foam bed in Alan's house drinking organge soda and eating corn pops out of the box waiting for this to come on

Which is now like a perfect 90s time capsule. Smoke! A Live Band! OVERALLS EVERYWHERE.
posted by The Whelk at 2:38 PM on July 25, 2011 [4 favorites]


Pete and Pete was such a perfect live action kids show. While I still enjoy Nicktoons, they bear an entirely different appeal for me as an adult. I can revisit episodes of Pete and Pete and can still learn something from them. And it's tinged with the right amount of absurdity to make it seem so much more real.
posted by triceryclops at 2:41 PM on July 25, 2011 [2 favorites]


(WHICH IS MISSING FROM YOUR POST - I don't think it was made by Nickelodeon however , it had the strong whiff of Canada about it)
posted by The Whelk at 2:41 PM on July 25, 2011


(nope was American and made at Nick Studios)
posted by The Whelk at 2:44 PM on July 25, 2011


Loved loved loved the Adventures of Pete and Pete.

Before Pete And Pete was turned into a continuing series, but after it was a bunch of introductory three-minute short-films, it was just a bunch of TV-specials, aired very occasionally.

I loved these specials; the deadpan wistful absurdity of them was completely entrancing, a comedic timbre like nothing I'd ever seen before, and whenever I saw an ad that announced an upcoming Pete and Pete special, I would immediately grab a VHS tape and set the VCR's timer to capture it, so I would have it just in case I forgot about the airing (which: did I ever forget about an airing? No. These specials were my Holy Grail back when the audience was captive to the whims of the network schedulers).

The last of these -- and, in my opinion, the best of these -- was Apocalypse Pete, a tale about a war between the Wrigleys and the Hickles, about the togetherness created by shared revenge and the sadness arising from putting ideology before love. (Also about an exploded action figure.) Eventually, this stand-alone special was repurposed as an episode of the continuing series. But apparently, it was prohibitively expensive for the showrunners to use the original soundtrack that had been played in its first airing, so they overdubbed a bunch of its music-heavy scenes with sound-alike songs.

This is a bigger deal than it might sound, since a major plot-point of Apocalypse Pete is that Ellen's dad is broadcasting songs directly into the metal plate inside Pete's mom's head. A war has broken out between Pete's house and Ellen's house, and when the opening guitar solo of Mountain's Mississipi Queen skirls itself out of Phil Hickle's record player, it's being used as a weapon. Was this the first time I ever heard Mississippi Queen? I'm not sure, but I tell you what: it's certainly the first time I remember the song. As a wee lad, the self-assured aggressive ferocity of that guitar solo gave me delighted, vicious, little chills.

So years later, when I bought the Pete And Pete Season 1 DVDs, I was completely dismayed to hear the new soundtrack. They did the best they could, but even if one feels charitable toward their sound-alike "Marmalade Creme", the obvious mismatch of Phil Hickle's lips to the vocal track is a little jarring.

Will anyone ever see and hear the original soundtrack version again? Probably not; I mean, no little kid is going to agitate for a Mountain song in a kids' show, and people my age have much better uses of their time than trying to explain to a Nickelodeon executive that Pete And Pete must STAND in its PUREST FORM, for it taught us not only about humor and whimsy, but also about the RAW EVIL POWER of rock and roll (Hail Satan).

Most of the objects I own are replaceable, but I'll tell you what's not: my VHS copy of Apocalypse Pete, recorded during the first showing of the special, with grainy video and the original soundtrack intact. There it sits: on magnetic tape, enclosed in plastic, labelled "The Awesome Tape," with black sharpie, accompanied by a little drawing of sunglasses, because sunglasses are what People wear to look Awesome.
posted by Greg Nog at 2:50 PM on July 25, 2011 [29 favorites]


I'm amazed and awed at Rhaomi's post, but would love to have seen inclusion of Out Of Control, especially since it was the very first show produced specifically for the channel (not to mention the origin of Coulier's signature "Cut It Out!" catchphrase.)

first full episode I could find
posted by namewithoutwords at 2:51 PM on July 25, 2011 [4 favorites]


I've got a few strong memories of Nickelodeon from growing up.

First, of course, are the bumpers, as so helpfully outlined above! Quintet is probably the most clear one in my mind.

Second, waking up at 5:30am most mornings to watch Mysterious Cities of Gold.

Also, for some bizarro reason, Bananaman, which no one else even remembers existed. And that "THAMES" title card on other British cartoons like Danger Mouse, which scared the crap out of me with its ominous-ness.
posted by curious nu at 2:51 PM on July 25, 2011 [4 favorites]


EmpressCallipygos:
...anyone else have any love for some of the other early shows like Danger Mouse or Belle and Sebastian?
Absolutely. Two of my childhood hamsters were named Penfold.
posted by rocketpup at 2:57 PM on July 25, 2011


Also, for some bizarro reason, Bananaman, which no one else even remembers existed.

curious_nu, I totally remember Bananaman!

Do you remember Spartakus and the Sun Beneath the Sea ?
posted by namewithoutwords at 2:59 PM on July 25, 2011 [1 favorite]


people my age have much better uses of their time than trying to explain to a Nickelodeon executive that Pete And Pete must STAND in its PUREST FORM,

I don't understand this, you have seen the Internet right?
posted by The Whelk at 3:01 PM on July 25, 2011 [2 favorites]


The band Tera Melos released a 5-song EP of covers when they first picked up a new drummer, including this great cover version of Polaris's "Hey Sandy," the theme song from The Adventures of Pete & Pete, as mentioned in the post. It's a blast, since the band re-creates the shots from the show's theme song, with the band members dressed up as all the characters, and the quiet bridge parts mix in a quick cover of the Beach Boys - "God Only Knows." It's only 99 seconds long, give it a watch!
posted by cobra_high_tigers at 3:37 PM on July 25, 2011


The Adventures of Pete & Pete never felt like a kids show. I was in my 20s when it aired and always felt that I was totally its target demographic. Syd Straw was the math teacher! Iggy Pop was the guidance counselor (and Nona's dad)! Michael Stipe showed up as a random ice cream man! Little Pete was tattooed, fond of flannel and called people "blowholes." And the Polaris soundtrack was all jangly garage pop. It hit all my little Gen-X buttons.

(And I still sing the words to Marmalade Cream whenever Mississippi Queen comes on.)
posted by jrossi4r at 3:45 PM on July 25, 2011 [2 favorites]


This post is amazing. Thank you so much for this.
posted by brett at 3:47 PM on July 25, 2011


Flagged as too thin for an FPP. Try harder next time, Rhaomi.
posted by briank at 3:48 PM on July 25, 2011 [4 favorites]


The point of Nick at Nite was the promos, which were often more entertaining than the shows themselves.

Forward to 3:15 for the brilliant "I Dream of Jeannie" promo set to a "Tom's Diner"-knockoff track.
posted by gimonca at 3:51 PM on July 25, 2011


The XYZ Affair has a music video featuring cameo's of nickelodeon actors as well. I recall seeing it here on the blue at some point, during another Pete and Pete thread.
posted by mrzarquon at 3:53 PM on July 25, 2011


Thank you. This is so great.
posted by solipsophistocracy at 4:00 PM on July 25, 2011


Whoa. Nice post. I worked at QUBE as an intern when I was in high school. The technology I got to see was truly mind-boggling. I remember working in master control and sitting there for hours watching Pinwheel shows as well as being able to slot vidoes for Video Jukebox which later became MTV. Amazing stuff.
posted by crosten at 4:11 PM on July 25, 2011 [1 favorite]


The Adventures of Pete & Pete never felt like a kids show. I was in my 20s when it aired and always felt that I was totally its target demographic. Syd Straw was the math teacher! Iggy Pop was the guidance counselor (and Nona's dad)! Michael Stipe showed up as a random ice cream man! Little Pete was tattooed, fond of flannel and called people "blowholes." And the Polaris soundtrack was all jangly garage pop. It hit all my little Gen-X buttons.

Totally. I would come home from college and watch P&P with my little brother, who is 12 years younger than me. We both thoroughly enjoyed it.
posted by Fleebnork at 4:27 PM on July 25, 2011


Jeebus H, Rhaomi. Well done.
posted by Space Kitty at 4:33 PM on July 25, 2011


Epic post. I loved Hey, Dude.
posted by roomthreeseventeen at 4:34 PM on July 25, 2011


I like that the AV Club writeup of Hey Dude singles out the theme song. Even though I literally do not remember a single other thing about the show (Christine Taylor was on it? Seriously?) I will go to my grave humming that tune.
posted by Rangeboy at 4:59 PM on July 25, 2011


did they have that repulsive Chin Head on nik outside Australia?
posted by moorooka at 4:59 PM on July 25, 2011


I love Rocko's Modern Life. I rewatched the first season on Netflix a few years ago, and was shocked to see how many of my family's inside jokes and phrases came from that show without knowing it. Every time I clean my house I sing, "Spring cleaning! SPRING CLEANING!" and it annoys my boyfriend to no end. That was the same summer where our cable package included Nickelodeon Games & Sports for two glorious weeks, where I did nothing but spend my time in-between jobs watching Global GUTS, Legends of the Hidden Temple, and What Would You Do?

You also can't forget about Roundhouse, the precursor to All That. Or Weinerville, the really bizarre puppet show that ran in the early 90s. And from Nick Jr. I remember Eureeka's Castle, which inspired my brother's imaginary friend Eeka (as in, "she's my eeka, not your eeka"). And didn't Inspector Gadget run on Nickelodeon too?
posted by lilac girl at 5:04 PM on July 25, 2011 [2 favorites]


Also, for some bizarro reason, Bananaman , which no one else even remembers existed.

Oh, I do. I remember the whole intro. Having things like that in my brain is why I can't retain math. But wait, it wasn't its own show, was it? I remember it being sandwiched into Dangermouse, like the B-roll cartoon within the cartoon. Like Sherman and Peabody within Rocky and Bullwinkle. Fuck me I'm old.
posted by Dormant Gorilla at 5:31 PM on July 25, 2011


It's like 1993 and I'm sitting on the memory foam bed in Alan's house drinking organge soda and eating corn pops out of the box waiting for this to come on

Whelk, you just caused me to have a freaky Jason Bourne moment when I clicked on your link, thought to myself "I don't know what this-" and then started singing the theme song word for word.
posted by Roman Graves at 5:36 PM on July 25, 2011 [3 favorites]


I didn't know what the hell "Eureka's Castle" was until I hit play and i KNEW ALL THE WORDS.

Nickelodeon totally incepted us. I' m pretty there's a code phrase that'll make us kill the president.
posted by The Whelk at 5:41 PM on July 25, 2011 [11 favorites]


Holy Fucking Shit. Now this is a post.
posted by lyam at 5:48 PM on July 25, 2011 [1 favorite]


I didn't know what the hell "Eureka's Castle" was until I hit play and i KNEW ALL THE WORDS.


Indeed. I thought of another missing show from the early Nickelodeon days. Remember Today's Special? Hocus Pocus Alimagocus!
posted by namewithoutwords at 5:48 PM on July 25, 2011 [3 favorites]


When asked why the president hadn't returned to the negotiating table, a glass-eyed Boehner responded "Whadda think is in the burgers?"
posted by Roman Graves at 5:50 PM on July 25, 2011 [9 favorites]


Wow, does this post take me back! A couple of Nickelodeon shows that I remember from the 80’s:
Today’s Special came on after Pinwheel and was my introductions to season-ending cliffhangers: the city was threatening to tear down the department store--will the gang figure out that the store is a landmark in time?
Danger Mouse and its spin-off Duckula were also pretty amazing, and every kid on my black wanted Danger Mouse’s car.
Finally, The Mysterious Cities of Gold, a show I hated, mostly because I could not follow what the heck was happening and they never seemed to use the awesome golden ship enough.
posted by quine's_gavagai at 6:20 PM on July 25, 2011


I had the biggest crush on Big Pete.

I also watched YCDTOT but I was always so confused as to why they kept eating the Barf Burgers. I mean, how many times do you have to puke down the back of a booth before you just stop eating there?
posted by TooFewShoes at 6:42 PM on July 25, 2011 [1 favorite]


Man, Today's Special. That's the other show that flits around, but I wasn't sure it was actually a Nick show. Now it can take its rightful place on that mental shelf!
posted by curious nu at 6:44 PM on July 25, 2011


/gapes
posted by mwhybark at 6:49 PM on July 25, 2011


Man, I think "Day in the Life of a Food" via the Uncle Floyd show pretty much scarred me for life. Those blood-curdling screams!

We all grew up on Danger Mouse and Duckula and now my kid is in love with The Fairly OddParents, which is so reminiscent of Ren & Stimpy. Good times!
posted by Wuggie Norple at 6:54 PM on July 25, 2011 [1 favorite]


The Adventures of Pete and Pete is the perfect '90s television show. Better than Seinfeld, better than X-Files, better than Babylon 5 - it had some serious competitors. But the sentimental surrealism and ferociously indie cast - LL Cool J as a teacher, Iggy Pop and Steve Buscemi as uncool dads, Buster Poindexter as a park ranger - was enough to shove it over the top into eternal greatness.

Just the scene where the cops are giving Bus Driver Stu a sobriety check with a stack of donuts and a tennis serve is about the best thing ever put on TV.
posted by Slap*Happy at 6:57 PM on July 25, 2011


Let's not forget when Nickelodeon went for a soap-opera - Fifteen.

Also.
posted by HotPants at 7:16 PM on July 25, 2011 [2 favorites]


My big thing was watching The Monkees at 6pm weeknights.
posted by Lucinda at 7:59 PM on July 25, 2011


Do you remember Spartakus and the Sun Beneath the Sea yt ?

I've been sitting on a FPP on this show for a while now. It turns out to be more awesome than you'd think from its Nickelodeon airing.

nthing Pete & Pete, the greatest thing Nick ever sponsored, yes even better than classic Ren & Stimpy. It's worth noting that the Nick movie Snow Day is in some ways a kind of look back on the show. By then the actors who played the Petes were too old for the roles so they created new kids, but it takes place in Wellsville and there are a few references to the show, including a cameo by sometimes-Pete-cameo Iggy Pop.
posted by JHarris at 8:18 PM on July 25, 2011


Oh, and the indie rock cameos on Pete & Pete are awesome yes, but my eyes nearly popped out of my head when they got John McLaughlin, of PBS' The McLaughlin Group, to do a few seconds for the show. "Bye-bye!"
posted by JHarris at 8:20 PM on July 25, 2011 [2 favorites]


Thank you for this. I actually didn't realize how much Nickelodeon and I had grown up together. I started watching the channel in the Pinwheel era (still remember the song), and came up all the way through All That before I finally outgrew it.

SNICK was among my favorite things. I will always have deep, deep love for Roundhouse.

And Fifteen. In which I crushed on Ryan Reynolds before it was fashionable.
posted by grrarrgh00 at 8:39 PM on July 25, 2011 [2 favorites]


Related, did you see the preview for the Adventure Time with Fiona and Cake episode?
posted by amuseDetachment at 9:18 PM on July 25, 2011 [1 favorite]


Oh me and my friend John used to trash the hell out of Fifteen. It was sooooo bad. Laura Harris's inability to help herself... Ryan Reynolds's one-note drunk jock... the pinball machine that was never turned on, even when the characters were playing... the boys' locker room that was painted pink, just like the girls' locker room...

...I swear, you could see those actors mouthing their stage directions as they dramatically stormed out of their scenes.
posted by infinitewindow at 9:23 PM on July 25, 2011 [1 favorite]


Update: If you loathe Facebook, there's a new dedicated site up with video clips, full episodes, and an associated Tumblr blog and Twitter feed.

Also, the fact they're airing the old bumpers alongside the shows is great, though I wish they weren't in that stuttery, heavily edited style.

Also: chocolate jacuzzi.
posted by Rhaomi at 9:31 PM on July 25, 2011 [1 favorite]


I am always confusing Double Dare with Fun House.
posted by IndigoRain at 10:02 PM on July 25, 2011


Haha, yes! Now I know where my pathological hatred of Ryan Reynolds came from! I used to think I just disliked him because he's mediocre actor who's been somehow catapulted to A-list status, but apparently it was actually a long delayed reaction to first seeing him on Fifteen. My brain has been subconsciously hating him for the last 20 years. It's like Clarissa just explained my id.
posted by i feel possessed at 3:00 AM on July 26, 2011


Also, this is a fabulous, wonderful post, Rhaomi. It's natural to miss your formative years, but if I had a time machine all I'd do is go back and wallow in the 1990s. A lot of that time would probably be spent rewatching all of my favorite Nickelodeon shows. This post makes me unbearably happy.
posted by i feel possessed at 3:20 AM on July 26, 2011


Great post.

Just want to say I was far from being a kid when it was on, but I never, never, never missed Pete and Pete. I would put that show up against anything before or since. Truly an original.

I loved Rocko's Modern life, too.
posted by Benny Andajetz at 5:50 AM on July 26, 2011


Well, the first link I clicked on led to TVTropes, and that killed about 5 hours.

I could be here for a while.... Jesus Christ, Rhaomi.
posted by schmod at 7:26 AM on July 26, 2011


First time I saw Pete and Pete, I was in my early 20s ( here in Australia) and it instantly became a can't miss program for me. To this day, I love it just as much as the first time.
posted by cerulgalactus at 7:28 AM on July 26, 2011


Pete & Pete had a lot of cool episodes, but the one that sticks out in my mind the most is the early one where young Pete has his own radio station, with an all-talk format, but one morning he's going in to school and he passes a house where Polaris (the band from the opening) is playing, and hears a song that gets stuck in his head. He's humming it all through school, and afterwards returns to the house to hear some more.

The hose is deserted. The garage where they were playing is locked.

Young Pete loves the song so much, but has to face the fact that he may never hear it again. He starts listening to all kinds of music, and takes requests on his radio station, to try to find it before it fades out of his memory forever.

It's a wonderful story. Unfortunately the above-mentioned music licensing problem might get in the way of broadcasting it now.
posted by JHarris at 11:22 AM on July 26, 2011 [1 favorite]


My fondest memory of Nickelodeon was waking up at 6AM every day for a year or two (while it was in that timeslot, maybe 1988-1990?) to watch back-to-back episodes of Mr. Wizard's World. Thanks, Don Herbert. I believe Pinwheel was (for a while) the show before Mr Wizard.

After it was over at 7AM I went back upstairs and napped until my mom woke me up to go to elementary school.


I did the same with my grandma when she lived with us. I would wake up early, toast some Eggo waffles in her little kitchen, then we would eat Eggos and learn SCIENCE.
posted by Evilspork at 4:23 PM on July 26, 2011 [1 favorite]


GamblingBlues: "Oh, and I got to meet Dangermouse."

I am so violently envious.
posted by galadriel at 7:59 PM on July 26, 2011


Out Of Control. Dave Coulier. Alanis Morissette. Mr. Duplicity.
posted by andreaazure at 9:23 PM on July 26, 2011


Rhaomi: "And of course there were the two big variety shows, both the work of Dan Schneider ("the Norman Lear of children’s television")."

Surely Mr. Schneider's crowning achievement was as Ricky in Better Off Dead.
posted by Chrysostom at 6:48 AM on July 27, 2011


Want REAL old Nick? Roman Holidays! What Will They Think Of Next!

I'm really old, huh?
posted by cereselle at 1:45 PM on July 27, 2011 [2 favorites]


Oh, and Kids Writes! Okay, I'm done now.
posted by cereselle at 1:46 PM on July 27, 2011 [1 favorite]


Thank you, cereselle! I could not for the life of me remember the name of this show that was a sort of 80s for-kids You Wrote It, You Watch It.
posted by infinitewindow at 4:26 PM on July 27, 2011


I am always confusing Double Dare with Fun House.

Me too! And I'm still not sure how JD Roth went from hosting that show, to suddenly being the executive producer on all of these reality TV shows over the last 10 years or so.
posted by antifuse at 10:41 AM on July 29, 2011 [1 favorite]


Oh man-- I can't believe I forgot to mention Don't Just Sit There !
posted by herbplarfegan at 11:00 AM on July 29, 2011 [1 favorite]


Wow, back in the day when they had an announcer do a live read of the upcoming show over a bumper or end credits.
posted by dr_dank at 10:11 AM on July 30, 2011


Man, this 90s retro thing they're doing seemed like such a great idea, but they're really blowing it. We're halfway through the third week of programming, and they're still airing the same four shows (twice!) every night. Don't get me wrong, All That and Kenan & Kel and Clarissa Explains It All and Doug were all good shows, but there's so much more they could be doing. Why not simply fill the eight half-hour slots with a random assortment of episodes from all their shows? It's not like they don't have the rights to them.
posted by Rhaomi at 1:00 AM on August 11, 2011 [1 favorite]




Haha, about time: Beginning Sept. 5, repeats of Hey Arnold! and Rocko’s Modern Life will replace Clarissa Explains It All and Doug Monday through Friday nights
posted by Rhaomi at 11:12 PM on August 24, 2011


Ooh, and I just wanted to note for posterity before the thread closes that, thanks to Mefites who shared the link with him, Fred Seibert himself added this post to his Instapaper queue! I am inordinantly pleased, even if Instapaper is often for maybe-eventually-someday reading. It's just too bad he never dropped by, woz/yoz-style.
posted by Rhaomi at 1:16 PM on August 25, 2011


« Older History Remixed.   |   I knew I should have taken... Newer »


This thread has been archived and is closed to new comments



Post