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February 20, 2012 5:05 PM   Subscribe

The Making of "Homer At The Bat"
posted by holdkris99 (84 comments total) 23 users marked this as a favorite

 
Woo hoo!
posted by sleepy pete at 5:07 PM on February 20, 2012


Holy shit, this episode falls after I stopped watching the show. I would have HATED it.

Twenty years on, I inexplicably have become a baseball fan, and bet I will LOVE this episode when I finally see it. Thank you so much.
posted by mwhybark at 5:16 PM on February 20, 2012



Lord Palmerston!

posted by The Whelk at 5:18 PM on February 20, 2012 [12 favorites]


:'(
posted by Ufez Jones at 5:19 PM on February 20, 2012 [1 favorite]


This is one of my fav Simpsons episodes ever. Especially the "Casey at Bat" style song at the end ("Steve Sax and his run in with the law"). Good post.
posted by reenum at 5:20 PM on February 20, 2012 [4 favorites]


Daaaaaaarryl.....
posted by Seiten Taisei at 5:20 PM on February 20, 2012 [5 favorites]


I SAID CUT YOUR HAIR
posted by The Whelk at 5:20 PM on February 20, 2012


Everyone who has used, "It's like there's a party in my mouth and everybody's invited!" upon trying a new delicious food or beverage, please raise your hand.
posted by robocop is bleeding at 5:25 PM on February 20, 2012 [28 favorites]


it's like there's a party in my mouth and everyone's throwing up!
posted by The Whelk at 5:27 PM on February 20, 2012 [2 favorites]


Especially the "Casey at Bat" style song at the end

That's Terry Cashman adapting his song Willie, Mickey & The Duke/Talkin' Baseball, an activity he was familiar with, since he made a version for every team in the league. I can't find the generic one, but this is the version I grew up with.
posted by Horace Rumpole at 5:30 PM on February 20, 2012 [4 favorites]


GROTESQUELY SWOLLEN JAW
posted by The Whelk at 5:35 PM on February 20, 2012 [4 favorites]


"You can't leave first until you chug a beer.
Any man scoring has to chug a beer.
You have to chug a beer at the top of all odd-numbered innings.
Oh, and the fourth inning is the beer inning."

And...

after I stopped watching the show

Halfway through season 3 is the earliest that I've ever heard anyone complain about the show going downhill. Did the animation improve too much for your liking? Or was it the cohesive plots and jokes?
posted by hwyengr at 5:35 PM on February 20, 2012 [35 favorites]


The Simpsons really went downhill about halfway through its run on The Tracy Ullman Show. The early stuff was so much better.
posted by Justinian at 5:37 PM on February 20, 2012 [9 favorites]


yeah like, as a huge simpsons nerd, the generally agreed on period when people quit watching was around season 8-9, with season 1-2 being seen as various shades of unlikable or trying-to-find-a-tone- did you really like the early season, heavily Cosby/sitcom feel of the first season? I'm not being sarcastic, I've just literally never met anyone who preferred the first season or so to the rest and I'm interested in what you liked about it.
posted by The Whelk at 5:38 PM on February 20, 2012 [3 favorites]


I strongly suspect mwhybark was confused as to when the episode in question aired, or perhaps when he stopped watching.
posted by Justinian at 5:40 PM on February 20, 2012


The Simpsons really went downhill about halfway through its run on The Tracy Ullman Show. The early stuff was so much better.

Cue the "Life in Hell" fans in 3...2...1...
posted by Gary at 5:41 PM on February 20, 2012 [3 favorites]


PITT THE ELDER!
posted by TheWhiteSkull at 5:42 PM on February 20, 2012 [2 favorites]


Daaaaaaaryyyyyyyylllll
posted by DU at 5:44 PM on February 20, 2012


Everyone who has used, "It's like there's a party in my mouth and everybody's invited!" upon trying a new delicious food or beverage, please raise your hand.

Wasn't that from the episode "Flaming Moe's"? Was it used twice?

(Then there's the Futurama variant: "It's like there's a party in my mouth... and everybody's throwing up.")
posted by Rory Marinich at 5:47 PM on February 20, 2012


Well I've never met you but, yes.
posted by Gary at 5:47 PM on February 20, 2012 [2 favorites]


LORD PALMERSTON!
posted by mightygodking at 5:48 PM on February 20, 2012


Well, duh.
posted by Trurl at 5:55 PM on February 20, 2012


It was a very Swartzweldian episode, especially the Prime Minister fight.

PITT. THE. ELDER!
posted by TwoWordReview at 5:55 PM on February 20, 2012


*Darryl jumps into the air and out of frame for a solid 4 seconds*
posted by weinbot at 5:56 PM on February 20, 2012 [1 favorite]


"Making of ?"

Once the incredible challenge of recording stiff dialogue for all the sports celebrities was met, I guess it was just a matter of hiring a bunch of elves to put the final touches on it.
posted by bonobothegreat at 5:59 PM on February 20, 2012


You watch too many movies, Saxy boy.
posted by Flunkie at 6:08 PM on February 20, 2012 [1 favorite]


It was a very Swartzweldian

I don't care how improbable it is, I still like the theory that John Swartzwelder doesn't actually exist.
posted by The Whelk at 6:23 PM on February 20, 2012


The greatest bit for me is Burn's picks for the team:

"Honus Wagner, Cap Anson, Mordecai 'Three Finger' Brown"

and

"Find me some good players! Living Players! Scour the professional ranks, the American Leauge, the National League, the Negro League"
posted by Grimgrin at 6:33 PM on February 20, 2012 [1 favorite]


it's the vocal stress he puts on Negro league that sells that joke.
posted by The Whelk at 6:36 PM on February 20, 2012


"That's showing him, Barney! *scoff* Pit the Elder. "
posted by entropicamericana at 6:37 PM on February 20, 2012


I don't care how improbable it is, I still like the theory that John Swartzwelder doesn't actually exist.

Of course he exists. John Swartzwelder is Ron Swanson.
posted by Gary at 6:38 PM on February 20, 2012 [2 favorites]


"That's showing him, Barney! *scoff* Pit the Elder. "

LORD. PALMERSTON!
posted by Pope Guilty at 6:41 PM on February 20, 2012 [3 favorites]


I've just literally never met anyone who preferred the first season or so to the rest

I can't even remember it.
posted by octobersurprise at 6:41 PM on February 20, 2012


I like the story that John Swartzwelder,when told he couldn't smoke in the diner he did all his writing at, went and bought one of the diner booths and set it up in his house so he could smoke and write in the same place.

And that writing for The Simpsons is the only job he ever had.
posted by The Whelk at 6:42 PM on February 20, 2012 [1 favorite]


MetaFilter: like watching some avant-garde, one-night-only experiment in ad hoc television.
posted by hippybear at 6:44 PM on February 20, 2012


I've just literally never met anyone who preferred the first season or so to the rest

I can't even remember it.


There's this REALLY uncomfortable moment on the commentary track for the pilot episode where the director is complaining about how awful the animation is the how they rushed it and the producers are trying to talk him down "well you know the Cosby show had problems at the start" and the director goes "Well the characters in the Cosby show didn't gain and loose ten pounds from scene to scene" and then just walked away from the commentary and you could hear the awkward silence for like a good ten minutes.
posted by The Whelk at 6:45 PM on February 20, 2012 [3 favorites]


No, really, I went thru a divorce and then, really really, did not have a TV for a few years. So '92-'95 or '96 is invisible to me, TV-wise, with the exception of TNG (a bar up the street would show it and the place would just PACK).

Plus, it was Seattle in 1992, I was single, and I had hair down to my ass and knew both guitars and computers.

So there was a lot of sitting around at home alone.
posted by mwhybark at 7:19 PM on February 20, 2012


The thing about the Simpsons:

When I first heard about them being on the Tracy Ullman show in elementary school, I was younger than bart.

In a few short years I will be as old as Homer, and I suspect they will still be on the air.
posted by lkc at 7:34 PM on February 20, 2012 [14 favorites]


There's this REALLY uncomfortable moment on the commentary track for the pilot episode where the director is complaining about how awful the animation is the how they rushed it and the producers are trying to talk him down "well you know the Cosby show had problems at the start" and the director goes "Well the characters in the Cosby show didn't gain and loose ten pounds from scene to scene" and then just walked away from the commentary and you could hear the awkward silence for like a good ten minutes.

Sometime around season 5 or 6 the commentaries start to decline in quality (oh, sweet irony), but the first several seasons of Simpsons commentary are absolutely gold. If you're interested in the Simpsons and/or the making of TV animation, and you haven't listened to the commentaries, you're doing yourself a disservice.
posted by Pope Guilty at 7:40 PM on February 20, 2012 [1 favorite]


Yes, the "party in my mouth" joke was on the Simpsons twice, once in Moe's dialog and once in Ken Griffey Jr.'s.

Opinions can differ on when (and on how fast) the Simpsons started to go downhill, but opinions in the category "earlier than mid season six" are simply wrong. The first act of "Homer: Bad Man" is possibly the greatest continuous stretch of hilarity that has ever been put between two commercials.
posted by roystgnr at 7:49 PM on February 20, 2012


Yeah you can like scatterplot the opinions of When The Simpsons Started To Suck and it's varied but you get the biggest cluster around season 7-8-9., with the "golen age" starting around season 3.
posted by The Whelk at 7:52 PM on February 20, 2012


"I speak of decency, the moral courage to say what is right and condemn what is wrong," Bush said. "And we need a nation closer to The Waltons than The Simpsons."

I'd forgotten that The Simpson's were that controversial early on. Hard to believe now.
posted by octothorpe at 8:01 PM on February 20, 2012


The Whelk:
I think it has to do with how old you were when you started watching. I consider 5-8 to be the peak of really memorable episodes, with 3-4, 9-10, averaging "pretty good".

I'm a huge simpsons nerd, though, and have revisited a lot of the post-10 episodes, and there are quite a few good ones in there, but far too many "Wow! Mark Zuckerberg!" moments, and not enough Jon "runs the antique shop" Waters.

I don't really know how to categorize it.
The humor is mostly tame, with some lame references thrown in, but there are a lot of great pieces of animation in there, too. They never really stopped caring about the quality of the artwork (or really the show, but they don't have the individual sparks that the early episodes had).

I don't watch a lot of current TV, but I keep up with The Simpsons. Even when they suck, they are still better than the average drek.
posted by lkc at 8:05 PM on February 20, 2012 [1 favorite]


(Though, I remember twitching a little in "Das Bus", when bart said "build a coconut Nintendo."
It was the first time (I noticed), them directly referencing a real world brand in the show. Of course there were butterfingers ads, but still...)
posted by lkc at 8:09 PM on February 20, 2012


3-9 was the plateau.

Also, regarding this article: I don't think that Lisa's chanting of "Darrrrryylllll" was a betrayal of her character as the author has made it out to be. In other episodes, Lisa kind of reveals herself to be enamored by the spectacle of professional sports, particularly baseball:

I can't think of a better place to spend a balmy summer's night than the old ball yard. There's just the green grass of the outfield, the crushed brick of the infield, and the white chalk lines that divide the man from the little boy. - "Dancin' Homer"

Shouting at the ballplayers themselves is something that has been around as long as the game itself. Lisa knows this, and she's happily participating in the weird human ritual known as baseball.
posted by weinbot at 8:15 PM on February 20, 2012 [4 favorites]


/Or, in this case, softball.
posted by weinbot at 8:15 PM on February 20, 2012


I think it has to do with how old you were when you started watching

I didn't have a TV that could show things that weren't tapes until I was like 14 so I have a delay here but I think you're mostly right.


As for the failure of the Simpsons, well there is that magic luck of having that much talent in the same room at the same time thing and how later episodes (which now out number the good episodes!) just dumped the central conceit that the Simpsons are a parody of the kind of family sitcoms of the 80s. That's the origin point, and good episodes play with that and bad episodes don't. It's why I really liked the movie, actually, cause it at least played lip service to the fact that we really like these characters and they're at their best when they're not being gag machines. And it pivoted on the Homer-Marge relationship, which is the axis of the show.
posted by The Whelk at 8:29 PM on February 20, 2012 [1 favorite]


Lisa taunting Daryl is still hilarious to me.

I'm not sure who these purists are, but the Simpsons characters adhering to expected roles is not what made the show good. Not even close.

The clever and silly placement of historical trivia, the recurring indignant mobs and their over-explanatory yammering, casual insolence and nerdy satire, etc. made it good - many of the same reasons I like metafilter.
posted by hellslinger at 8:34 PM on February 20, 2012 [1 favorite]


Yeah you can like scatterplot the opinions of When The Simpsons Started To Suck and it's varied but you get the biggest cluster around season 7-8-9., with the "golen age" starting around season 3.

I feel compelled to point out that there's a book about the show (*cough* self-promotion *cough*) that makes a strong argument for the "Golden Age" running from the middle of Season 3 until some time in Season 9 by the most generous accounting.

The moment of undeniable decline was "The Principal and the Pauper" (with that awful final-scene pretend-this-never-happened cop-out); the pivot point where the amusing curiosity of the first couple seasons became unmistakably the Best Comedy Institution of Its Era was, so the book claims, "Homer at the Bat."

Hell of a guy, that book's author. You should give him money.
posted by gompa at 8:44 PM on February 20, 2012 [3 favorites]


gompa, that is exactly the moment the show went under. You nailed it.
posted by weinbot at 8:49 PM on February 20, 2012


I can't recall the exact details, but apparently Harry Shearer made a pretty strong case to the production team on the first cast reading of the Principal and Pauper script for either overhauling it or scrapping it entirely.

Of course, it would appear Shearer didn't care for "Homer at the Bat," either, so his judgement's far from perfect.
posted by gompa at 8:55 PM on February 20, 2012


As a data point, I've found it hard to find any top ten or twenty episode list that had any episode after seasons 9 or 10.

Closer to the topic, a list of the ten best Simpsons sports episodes ever.
posted by ZeusHumms at 9:06 PM on February 20, 2012


Ozzie falling into the Mystery Spot will always be the highlight of this episode for me. Like, every "ringer" had to go out someway and this was, to me, as a child, the first glimpse of how The Simpsons and everything afterwards would handle just using straight-up bizzareness to make a plot work, and it was funny as hell.
posted by Navelgazer at 9:07 PM on February 20, 2012 [3 favorites]


Closer to the topic, a list of the ten best Simpsons sports episodes ever.

Man, hockey really doesn't get enough respect. A Star is Burns has the thinnest connection to sports ever and he picked that and Simpsons roasting on an open fire (season 1!!) over the one where Bart and Lisa play each other in pee-wee hockey.
posted by TwoWordReview at 9:23 PM on February 20, 2012 [1 favorite]


Because of Hungry Hungry Homer, there is now a team called the Albuquerque Isotopes. That should win over "A Star is Burns" on a sports list.

Also agreed about Lisa On Ice. Even if the penalty shot doesn't make any sense (Lisa couldn't win even if she made the save), it's drowning in good Homer quotes:

Well, boy, you won. So I'm going to live up to my side of the agreement: here's your turtle, alive and well.

Oh my God, Marge. A penalty shot with only four seconds left. It's your child versus mine! The winner will be showered with praise; the loser will be taunted and booed until my throat is sore!
posted by Gary at 10:14 PM on February 20, 2012 [1 favorite]


LORD. PALMERSTON!

PITT. THE. ELDER!
posted by ZeusHumms at 11:34 PM on February 20, 2012


Also worth noting, Meet the two brave souls who watched 86 hours and 37 minutes of 'The Simpsons' in a row. They were the survivors of a 100 person field who were trying to break the world record held by 3 '24' fans, who watched something like 86 hours and 6 minutes of their show. Reportedly, they stopped after the 11th episode of the 11th season.
posted by ZeusHumms at 11:37 PM on February 20, 2012


I've always considered Lisa On Ice to be possibly the best episode of the Simpsons, period. If nothing else, it's the pinnacle of Homer's character.

Also: "Me fail English? That's unpossible!"
It was the first time (I noticed), them directly referencing a real world brand in the show.
Doubt it was the first, but the one I always remember is when a bunch of kids are stranded on an island and one says, "I'm so hungry, I could eat at Arby's!"

Ah, bringing me to another Wiggum: "They taste like burning!"
posted by bjrubble at 11:43 PM on February 20, 2012


Oh yeah Homer has some killer lines in that episode ("if you get eaten it's your own fault") but the winning gag has to belong to chief Wiggum.

"We won! Ahem, Unfortunately since I bet on the other team we won't be going for pizza."
posted by TwoWordReview at 11:46 PM on February 20, 2012 [1 favorite]


hwyengr you left out the best line of this exchange, after "the fourth inning is the beer inning" Chief Wiggum nudges the guy aside and says contemptuously: "Hey, we know how to play softball."
posted by chaff at 12:35 AM on February 21, 2012


Also, while I totally understand the argument that "Principal and the Pauper" was the start of the show's decline, I remember watching it as it aired and just being blown away by that final scene, especially Hibbert's "on penalty of torture." I laughed my ass off and thought it was a brilliant episode, and still pretty much do. "Up yours, children!"
posted by chaff at 12:40 AM on February 21, 2012 [4 favorites]


you left out the best line of this exchange

I set 'em up, you knock 'em down.
posted by hwyengr at 1:03 AM on February 21, 2012


1-2: Still raw, but frequently good
3-6: Perfect
7-8: Good

And then the Simpsons was canceled at the end of season 8, as everyone knows.
posted by Chrysostom at 6:25 AM on February 21, 2012 [2 favorites]


Pfffft. Pfffffffffft, I say.

No list that excludes genuine honest-to-god-I-really-think-this best episode ever Saddlesore Galactica is a list I want anything to do with. And that sports episodes list! HORSE RACING IS A SPORT BEST EPISODE.

I mean, I'll deal with those murderous trolls.
posted by emmtee at 6:35 AM on February 21, 2012


Great episode. I think the writers did a great job with the guest stars, giving them each their own little storyline and their own time on the show, and not of it feeling forced.
posted by notmydesk at 6:45 AM on February 21, 2012 [1 favorite]


yeah like, as a huge simpsons nerd, the generally agreed on period when people quit watching was around season 8-9

If you didn't have satellite TV, then The Simpsons didn't reach the UK for you until 1996. Channel 4 had a terrible habit of showing the same episodes over and over again, as well, so I have no idea which season is which.

It's still 80000 times better than Family Guy in any season, mind.
posted by mippy at 7:53 AM on February 21, 2012 [1 favorite]


FWIW, my cut-off for the Golden Era of The Simpsons goes to Season 8, episode 9 with the Guatemalan Insanity Pepper. I had assumed this was a general consenus. Truly, we are a divided nation.
posted by word_virus at 8:09 AM on February 21, 2012 [1 favorite]


After a couple of years of hoping it would turn around I think finally stopped watching new episodes of The Simpsons around season 11. It was not unlike the moment you realize that you've drifted apart from your childhood best friend; I was in 9th grade when season 1 premiered and enjoyed those golden age episodes all the way through high school and college. Oh, the handwringing over those "Underachiever and Proud of it" t-shirts!
posted by usonian at 8:35 AM on February 21, 2012


Kill Bart, kill Bart!

Kill, Bart! Kill, Bart!
posted by The Whelk at 8:40 AM on February 21, 2012 [1 favorite]


Still, probably, my most favorite Simpsons episode. If for no other reason than the line, "Now batting for Darryl Strawberry...Homer Simpson." That's just giggly surreal.
posted by Thorzdad at 8:48 AM on February 21, 2012


FWIW, my cut-off for the Golden Era of The Simpsons goes to Season 8, episode 9 with the Guatemalan Insanity Pepper. I had assumed this was a general consenus. Truly, we are a divided nation.

"El Viaje Mysterioso de Nuestro Jomer" is a very divisive episode. It's on my All-Time Top Ten, mainly because the psychedelic spirit quest is probably the most inventive visual sequence in the show's history. It is also hysterically funny and has Johnny Cash as the voice of the space coyote spirit guide, which is so incontestably awesome that I have erased the register in my hearing range that receives arguments to the contrary.

On the other hand, some can't get past that cringeworthy Men are from Mars reference at the end. It is, however, set up by an all-time classic gag, with Homer's silhouette projected from the lighthouse against the night sky, spied out their bedroom window by Bart and Lisa.

Bart: "Hey, look, is that Dad?"

Lisa: "Either that, or Batman's really let himself go."
posted by gompa at 8:54 AM on February 21, 2012 [2 favorites]


@gompa: Don't get me wrong, I love that episode. I just feel like it was in the beginning of the end for all of the thoughtful, character-driven stuff that I enjoyed, which then got replaced with Homer's Zany Antic of the Week. Then Family Guy happened and there was truly no going back.
posted by word_virus at 9:00 AM on February 21, 2012


Agreed on the transition from character-driven plots to Zany Homer as one of the key indicators of the show losing its edge. I just think it occurred gradually through Season 8 and into Season 9. In the second half of Season 8 alone you had "The Twisted World of Marge Simpson" (Homer cuts a deal with the Mob to make Marge's dream come true) and "Homer's Enemy" (Frank Grimes!), among others.
posted by gompa at 9:08 AM on February 21, 2012


Reading through the episode lists, season 9 (a few stand-outs aside) definitely seems to be where things really started to go off the rails.
posted by usonian at 9:27 AM on February 21, 2012


The Simpsons died when Ian Maxtone-Graham took over. I thought this was understood as Gospel. It officially dove to "bad more often than good" with "Alone Again, Natura-diddly," when Maude was killed off.

As for the Golden Era, yeah. It ends with Season 8. Season 9 is funny but moments creep in where it feels like it's faking it. Then it all goes downhill from there.
posted by Navelgazer at 9:28 AM on February 21, 2012


The Simpsons hasn't died for me. The newer seasons are inconsistent, not horrible.
posted by girlmightlive at 9:34 AM on February 21, 2012


Oh man, your establishing Simpsons Nerd bonafides when your naming producers who ruined the show. So many of the writers went and decamped to King Of The hill, which really, really feels like early Simpsons episodes sometimes.
posted by The Whelk at 9:53 AM on February 21, 2012 [1 favorite]


And then the Simpsons was canceled at the end of season 8, as everyone knows.

Save that "it was so bad it never happened" nonsense for the Star Wars Prequels or the fourth season of Deadwood. Seasons 9-12 still had some really good episodes. After that it slowly turned into an animated Mad Magazine with the constant parodies and guest stars. But even in that there are funny moments.

These days it has reached the point where the guest stars are obviously just people the writers wanted to meet. A Will Shortz cameo? That's going to get the kids watching again!
posted by Gary at 10:15 AM on February 21, 2012 [3 favorites]


Great post, thanks. Brings back great memories. I made some serious pre-internet efforts to find the lyrics of "Talkin' Softball".
posted by Melismata at 10:32 AM on February 21, 2012


Lisa taunts Darryl Strawberry because she's supporting her dad, which is something that she will always, always do. Lisa is immensely loyal to Homer, even though they have the rough spots that occur from the conflict of their personalities.


And then the Simpsons was canceled at the end of season 8, as everyone knows.

Woah, woah, woah, there. I'm a "Season 8 was the last good season" guy myself, but if you eliminate Season 9, you eliminate The Joy of Sects, which is one of the all-time great Simpsons episodes. Season 10, sure, whatever, but you're gonna have to pry that bathtub out of my cold dead hands before you can throw that baby out.
posted by Pope Guilty at 10:33 AM on February 21, 2012 [2 favorites]


From Jim Creighton's (one of Burn's requests) wikipedia page:

Playing for the Excelsior of Brooklyn from 1860 to 1862, at the the height of his popularity, he injured himself in a game in October 1862 when he suffered a ruptured abdominal hernia hitting a home run. The internal bleeding this created subsequently caused his death four days later.


Damn dude! Way to swing for the fences!
posted by Big_B at 10:56 AM on February 21, 2012 [2 favorites]


Pope Guilty: "I'm a "Season 8 was the last good season" guy myself, but if you eliminate Season 9, you eliminate The Joy of Sects, which is one of the all-time great Simpsons episodes. Season 10, sure, whatever, but you're gonna have to pry that bathtub out of my cold dead hands before you can throw that baby out."

I just am very allergic to "total cartoon Homer." Seasons 1-2 were basically Bill Cosby-parody Homer. Then, in the sweet spot, it was pitch perfect-Homer still had some foothold on reality, while being somewhat wacky. Then he-and by extension, the show-turned into something totally freeform. Homer can be or do anything that works for a laugh. But, for me at least, that takes away any humanity. Why should I care about this guy?
posted by Chrysostom at 2:22 PM on February 21, 2012


less chat, more hat!
posted by slapshot57 at 8:18 PM on February 21, 2012


It is nice to keep it simple and say that The Simpsons simply ended after the 9th season, but that is far too simple a way to look at it. I think people tend to assume good episodes actually came earlier in the show. The Golden Age was over, to be sure, but seasons 10-14 at least had good episodes, hearkening back to earlier days.

10 had Lisa Gets an A, Mayored to the Mob, Homer Simpson in "Kidney Trouble", and Homer to the Max, all of which were pretty great.

11 had Guess Who's Coming to Criticize Dinner? and I will be damned if you fuckers are going to take that away from me.

Hell there are at least one good episode a season. It's just a lot harder to enjoy the highs when they're surrounded by so many lows.
posted by graventy at 2:25 PM on February 22, 2012


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