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Does this mean Canadians get to put Bjork on the hundred dollar bill?
March 2, 2012 9:33 AM   Subscribe

Iceland eyes loonie, Canada ready to talk. Iceland, still reeling from the aftershocks of the devastating collapse of its banks in 2008, is looking longingly to the loonie as the salvation from wild economic gyrations and suffocating capital controls.... The Canadian government says it’s open to discussing the idea.

Iceland is... in a bind. The country imposed strict currency controls after its spectacular banking collapse in 2008. Foreign-exchange transactions are capped 350,000 kronus (about $3,000). A major downside of those controls is that foreign investors can’t repatriate their profits, making Iceland an unattractive place to do business.

Those capital controls are slated to come off next year. And many experts fear a return to the wild swings of the past -- in inflation, lending rates and the currency itself. Iceland is the smallest country in the world still clinging to its own currency and monetary policy. The krona soared nearly 90 per cent between 2001 and 2007, only to crash 92 per cent after the financial crisis in 2008.


It’s hard to imagine Canada would object. Iceland wouldn’t have a say in Canadian monetary policy and the dollars coursing through its small economy ($12-billion in GDP versus Canada’s $1.8-trillion) would be a blip in the Bank of Canada’s management of the money supply.

Wikipedia primer on the 2008–2011 Icelandic financial crisis
Could Iceland be a model for debt-ridden Europe?
IMF Survey - Iceland's Recovery: Can the Lessons Be Applied Elsewhere?
posted by KokuRyu (93 comments total) 10 users marked this as a favorite

 
What a saga!
posted by clvrmnky at 9:38 AM on March 2, 2012 [4 favorites]


Interesting stuff, but where that first article is headlined "Iceland" it seems to translate as "a group of Icelandic businessmen" and some popular support.

And Iceland is trying to join the EU (see eg here from last month), which would require it to adopt the Euro. So it doesn't look like this is very likely.
posted by Infinite Jest at 9:39 AM on March 2, 2012


For 150 years, no country has expressed interest in adopting the Canadian dollar -- the poor cousin to the coveted greenback.

Poor cousin, my ass. As of 39 minutes ago, the Bank of Canada U.S. exchange rate for the Canadian dollar was 1.0113. Bwahahahahahaha!!!
posted by orange swan at 9:39 AM on March 2, 2012 [5 favorites]


Welcome Back! We kept Newfoundland just the way you left it.
posted by Seiten Taisei at 9:40 AM on March 2, 2012 [57 favorites]


I would totally enroll my sons in an Icelandic immersion school.
posted by KokuRyu at 9:42 AM on March 2, 2012 [3 favorites]


And Iceland is trying to join the EU (see eg here from last month), which would require it to adopt the Euro. So it doesn't look like this is very likely.

Is that a requirement? There are lots of EU countries that have not adopted the Euro.
posted by molecicco at 9:42 AM on March 2, 2012 [1 favorite]


an Icelandic immersion school

That's where they hold classes in volcanic hot springs?
posted by Celsius1414 at 9:42 AM on March 2, 2012 [4 favorites]


Er. Actually, I read that wrong - it's the U.S. dollar that is worth $1.0113 Cdn. as of noon today.
posted by orange swan at 9:43 AM on March 2, 2012 [2 favorites]


“One popular Icelandic blog raises a significant objection to the idea: anti-British loathing is, and will be for the foreseeable future, so strong in Iceland that the populace would be psychologically reluctant to accept notes bearing the face of the Queen.”

To counteract this, I point out that the toonie, the Canadian two dollar coin has an image of the Queen on one side, and a polar bear on the other...leading some to point out the coin is the Queen with a bear behind.

Anyways, not sure the idea will gain enough traction, but it is interesting to hear anyways.
posted by never used baby shoes at 9:44 AM on March 2, 2012 [3 favorites]


As of 39 minutes ago, the Bank of Canada U.S. exchange rate for the Canadian dollar was 1.0113.

Yes, and since Canada is the US's number one export market it must be working out great for you.
posted by The 10th Regiment of Foot at 9:47 AM on March 2, 2012 [1 favorite]


"...leading some to point out the coin is the Queen with a bear behind."

ah yes, the infamous "Moonie".
posted by striatic at 9:48 AM on March 2, 2012 [5 favorites]


This is absolutely never going to happen. The Canadian media is a lot more excited about this than anyone in Iceland. Some months ago my dad was interviewed by a Canadian Francophone radio station about this and it was the first time he had heard of it outside of a brief news-report.
posted by Kattullus at 9:48 AM on March 2, 2012 [1 favorite]


For 150 years, no country has expressed interest in adopting the Canadian dollar

Yeah, I know this was said to be clever, but the history of the adoption of the US dollar as international exchange is less "expressed interest" and more "if you don't sell us your fucking bananas using an exchange rate anchored in our own debt allowances, measured in our own currency, then good luck finding someone to sell you tractors, parts and fuel in this hemisphere".

So, there is a combination of opportunity /and/ exploitation that countries other then the US have no been able to capitalize on, historically.

Given how fucking profitable Canadian banks are, both abroad and domestically, I'm thinking no one really cares what currency you trade in. When your main export as a company is pants-wetting profit, you could care less who's picture is on it.
posted by clvrmnky at 9:49 AM on March 2, 2012 [1 favorite]


I don't know why we would do this. Even though they're operating at ~1% or whatever of our GDP, it's introducing a highly volatile and beleaguered economy that would still have sovereign control over its economic policies. What's Greece's economy worth relative to the rest of Europe? And look what a shitshow that's been.

On the other had, I say we do it and then make Bjork read our national news. Because, there are few things in this life that I like more than listening to Bjork talk.
posted by jimmythefish at 9:50 AM on March 2, 2012 [5 favorites]


It's a bunch of Icelander businessmen and opposition politicians spitballing an alternative to the euro, sure. The significant thing is that we're open to talks about it. I think most Canadians would be in favour or at worst neutral to the idea.

As one of the articles says, there is a large Icelandic diaspora, something like 100,000 people, in western Canada, Manitoba and Saskatchewan---I'm one of them. Icelander shopping parties are a phenomenon in St. John's.
posted by bonehead at 9:51 AM on March 2, 2012 [2 favorites]


Großkanada kommt.
posted by No Robots at 9:51 AM on March 2, 2012 [5 favorites]


Something to consider. And, if the Harperbots have their way with deregulation of the banking industry at some point, good bye stability of the banking system.
posted by Phlegmco(tm) at 9:52 AM on March 2, 2012


which would require it to adopt the Euro

What an attractive proposition that is in 2012, especially to a small country with a history of credit problems.

Who wouldn't want the Germans forcing a bunch of austerity measures down their throats in the middle of a recession, and eventually replacing the government with a "technocratic" one that will govern the country in the interests of its creditors?
posted by strangely stunted trees at 9:52 AM on March 2, 2012 [2 favorites]


On the other had, I say we do it and then make Bjork read our national news.

I think one of the conditions Canada should impose on an Icelandic currency agreement is that Sigur Ros has to become a Tragically Hip cover band.
posted by KokuRyu at 9:53 AM on March 2, 2012 [15 favorites]


Is that a requirement? There are lots of EU countries that have not adopted the Euro.

Yes, it's a requirement. The states which haven't joined yet either have not met the economic criteria (hah!) or have an optout.
posted by Jehan at 9:56 AM on March 2, 2012 [2 favorites]


This is absolutely never going to happen.

Y U SHATTER DREAM OF HANGING WITH COOL KIDS

"Cool" kids, geddit? ...I'll show myself out.
posted by Phire at 9:58 AM on March 2, 2012 [4 favorites]


there is a large Icelandic diaspora, something like 100,000 people, in western Canada

That's...unbelievable.
posted by psoas at 10:00 AM on March 2, 2012


I think one of the conditions Canada should impose on an Icelandic currency agreement is that Sigur Ros has to become a Tragically Hip cover band.

OK it's now my life's goal to hear Bjork pronounce 'Bobcaygeon' in the context of introducing Sigur Ros' cover of the same during a Hockey Night in Rekyavik simulcast.
posted by jimmythefish at 10:00 AM on March 2, 2012 [5 favorites]


On the other had, I say we do it and then make Bjork read our national news.

"Se naughty persson who was ssaying bad sings abaout Wictor Toews on se twitters hass been fired from the Liberaal paarty. Up next- se highlights from the Leafss' match againsst the Senaators ahnd aall se laatest scores."
posted by TheWhiteSkull at 10:01 AM on March 2, 2012 [13 favorites]


>there is a large Icelandic diaspora, something like 100,000 people, in western Canada

That's...unbelievable.


One of the best professors I had while attending university was WD Valgardson, who writes a lot about Icelandic-Canadian life in on the shores of Lake Winnipeg.

He's a great writer (if you like Raymond Carver).
posted by KokuRyu at 10:03 AM on March 2, 2012 [2 favorites]


there is a large Icelandic diaspora, something like 100,000 people, in western Canada

That's...unbelievable.


I only believe it because of recent CBC interview where icelandic CBC host seeks to obtain the elusive skyr in Canada.
posted by chapps at 10:05 AM on March 2, 2012 [1 favorite]


And Magnus Ver Magnesson gets a roster spot on the Team Canada hockey side in Sochi as our enforcer.
posted by Keith Talent at 10:06 AM on March 2, 2012 [2 favorites]


"...regarded by many to be one of the best strongmen of all time."
posted by KokuRyu at 10:13 AM on March 2, 2012


I only believe it because of recent CBC interview where icelandic CBC host seeks to obtain the elusive skyr in Canada.

OK, I can understand that desire -- we technically have skyr in the U.S. (branded as "skyr.is" in your local Whole Foods) but it's not the same as what I bought in Iceland; it's about as good as if KFC sold poutine.
posted by psoas at 10:13 AM on March 2, 2012 [2 favorites]


That's...unbelievable.

It should be understood as "of partial Icelandic descent" and not Icelandic expatriates. Otherwise 25% of Iceland people would be living in Canada!
posted by Jehan at 10:13 AM on March 2, 2012 [1 favorite]


That's...unbelievable.

There was severe famine in northern Iceland in the late 1800s because of a volcano eruption. My grandfather recalled a year without summer, the ice never left the fields.

At that time, Canada was giving away land and citizenship to expand residency in Manitoba and Saskatchewan, so lots of people emigrated.

Ancestry, that's where I'm a viking. Quite literally: Eric the Red is my 56th or 57th great uncle.
posted by bonehead at 10:14 AM on March 2, 2012 [3 favorites]


if KFC sold poutine

Did anybody hear that sound? As if millions of voices cried out in terror and were suddenly ill.
posted by Celsius1414 at 10:14 AM on March 2, 2012 [11 favorites]


But I thought Iceland was a land of happiness and freedom because they told the evil financiers to forget about ever getting any debt repayment. What is this about capital controls and being shut out of markets? Do you mean to say that blowing off debt repayments does not result in a financial nirvana after all?
posted by anigbrowl at 10:15 AM on March 2, 2012


First order of business: Tim Horton's in Reykjavik
posted by wcfields at 10:16 AM on March 2, 2012 [4 favorites]


anigbrowl: "But I thought Iceland was a land of happiness and freedom because they told the evil financiers to forget about ever getting any debt repayment. What is this about capital controls and being shut out of markets? Do you mean to say that blowing off debt repayments does not result in a financial nirvana after all?"

Better than Greece?
posted by wierdo at 10:16 AM on March 2, 2012 [2 favorites]


I think it would be best if Bjork responded to your comment via interpretive dance.
posted by KokuRyu at 10:16 AM on March 2, 2012 [1 favorite]


if KFC sold poutine.

Actually, Burger King did sell poutine for quite a while. Before, you know, all locations turned into barren wastelands that not even the local highschool miscreants would dare venture through.

It's every bit as awful as you think, and twice as salty.
posted by Phire at 10:16 AM on March 2, 2012


It should be understood as "of partial Icelandic descent" and not Icelandic expatriates.

Granted, it's similar to the population of Ireland (6 million) vs. Irish-Americans (36 million), but that still takes me by surprise. Huh.
posted by psoas at 10:18 AM on March 2, 2012


if KFC sold poutine

KFC.ca tells me that they do. Apparently not to Reykjavik though.
posted by bonehead at 10:19 AM on March 2, 2012 [1 favorite]


if KFC sold poutine

In the immortal words of Beavis: "Diarrhea! Cha cha cha!"
posted by Mister Fabulous at 10:21 AM on March 2, 2012 [1 favorite]


if KFC sold poutine

Did anybody hear that sound? As if millions of voices cried out in terror and were suddenly ill.


The KFCs in Toronto do sell poutine. I'm pretty sure it's widespread across Canada.
posted by orange swan at 10:22 AM on March 2, 2012 [3 favorites]


psoas: OK, I can understand that desire -- we technically have skyr in the U.S. (branded as "skyr.is" in your local Whole Foods) but it's not the same as what I bought in Iceland

Whole Foods in Providence had un-flavored skyr as well when I lived there, which I much prefer to the flavored stuff like skyr.is. The best way to prepare it is to is stir fruit and/or nuts into it. I'm particularly partial to bananas and coconut, though blueberries are a close second.
posted by Kattullus at 10:23 AM on March 2, 2012 [2 favorites]


My favourite is skyr on cinnamon pancakes.
posted by bonehead at 10:25 AM on March 2, 2012 [1 favorite]


Good thing they have the good sense to ASK the Canadians first.

When Argentina decided to peg to the U.S. dollar, Greenspan told them not to, that it was a bad idea.

They ignored him, and it cost them dearly.
posted by ocschwar at 10:26 AM on March 2, 2012


An interesting blip in the article for me was this: “And Canada thinks about the Arctic.”

To which I say: Not as much as we should. I'm not really sure how allowing Iceland to adopt the loonie would be helpful in our supposed quest for arctic domination, but we certainly do need to think more about the arctic than we currently do.

One of the few things that I agree with our current government about is the need to invest more heavily in the North. I suspect that Harper is mostly paying lip service to Northern issues, but it's better than pretending like Canada's Arctic Territories don't exist.
posted by asnider at 10:28 AM on March 2, 2012


Er. Actually, I read that wrong - it's the U.S. dollar that is worth $1.0113 Cdn. as of noon today.

No, you had it right the first time - CADUSD is presently above par.

posted by ceribus peribus at 10:32 AM on March 2, 2012


Also, if I can doulbe-post:

if KFC sold poutine.

They do. It's not great, but I've had worse.

Icelander shopping parties are a phenomenon in St. John's.

Seriously? For some reason, I find this really awesome.

there is a large Icelandic diaspora, something like 100,000 people, in western Canada

That's...unbelievable.


Stephan G. Stephansson is a relatively famous Icelandic-Canadian poet. He was one of many Icelanders who came to the Canadian prairies. Having grown up here, and having visited his house (which is now a historic site), I'm not at all surprised that the numbers are as large as they are.

Fun fact: Stephansson had special teacups made with "moustache guards" so that his moustache wouldn't dip into his tea while he was drinking it.
posted by asnider at 10:35 AM on March 2, 2012 [1 favorite]


They could all just move to Gimli, MB. No one would notice.
posted by WinnipegDragon at 10:48 AM on March 2, 2012


Say Islendingadagurinn five times fast...
posted by WinnipegDragon at 10:48 AM on March 2, 2012


Granted, it's similar to the population of Ireland (6 million) vs. Irish-Americans (36 million), but that still takes me by surprise. Huh.

Sure, I didn't mean to be insulting. But great amounts of partial descendants shouldn't be to surprising. There are millions of people with an ancestor on the Mayflower, and they only numbered about 100.
posted by Jehan at 10:55 AM on March 2, 2012 [1 favorite]


Adding my 2 pennies (CDN pennies, naturally!) re: KFC poutine.

It's KFC's cardboard-y fries + that odd pale chicken gravy + shredded mozzarella from a bag.

it's fucking delicious
posted by AmandaA at 11:11 AM on March 2, 2012 [1 favorite]


One of the few things that I agree with our current government about is the need to invest more heavily in the North. I suspect that Harper is mostly paying lip service to Northern issues, but it's better than pretending like Arctic Territories don't exist.

asnider, I wish you were right. Continuing cuts to Arctic research, for example, make me think that lip service is in full swing. As with so many other issues, it's necessary to judge the Harper government by what they do, not what they say. The sovereignty aspects of this, never mind the environmental monitoring consequences, make me deeply suspicious (the alternative is to believe that they really are that incompetent).
posted by sneebler at 11:16 AM on March 2, 2012


The only poutine worse than KFC's is Harvey's.
posted by syncope at 11:39 AM on March 2, 2012


Does Iceland have a curling team?

It all sounds about as likely as the Turns and Caicos becoming the 11th province. But if it did happen I would absolutely visit the place, just to have the experience of visiting a foreign country without changing currency.
posted by i_have_a_computer at 11:47 AM on March 2, 2012 [2 favorites]


Here is another story about Iceland potentially adopting the loonie.

sneebler - I was not aware of those cuts; I guess the government is not as pro-North as I thought.
posted by asnider at 11:54 AM on March 2, 2012


What an attractive proposition that is in 2012, especially to a small country with a history of credit problems.

Well, as I say, they are doing it, so it apparently seems attractive to them. They've been trying to join since soon after the collapse of their banks, and are quite far along the process.

It's a basic EU rule that adopting the Euro is a requirement for any new state which joins the EU from now on.

[Incidentally, Serbia was just granted candidate status to the EU, joining for other countries including Iceland, and Croatia joined a few months ago, so there is apparently still some perceived value in membership]
posted by Infinite Jest at 11:56 AM on March 2, 2012


Heck, let's bring Iceland into confederation! I've always wanted to go there.
posted by Pseudoephedrine at 12:06 PM on March 2, 2012


Here is another story about Iceland potentially adopting the loonie.

Heh, that's some good writing. Thanks for posting. I will have to check out more from Colby Cosh.
posted by KokuRyu at 12:06 PM on March 2, 2012


Heh, that's some good writing. Thanks for posting. I will have to check out more from Colby Cosh.

A lot people like to shit on Maclean's, but Cosh is one of the reasons why I think it's still a magazine worth reading.
posted by asnider at 12:18 PM on March 2, 2012


OK it's now my life's goal to hear Bjork pronounce 'Bobcaygeon' in the context of introducing Sigur Ros' cover of the same during a Hockey Night in Rekyavik simulcast.

... wearing a Canada Goose dress, of course.
posted by Kabanos at 12:41 PM on March 2, 2012 [1 favorite]


First order of business: Tim Horton's in Reykjavik

Somehow i don't think exporting mediocre coffee and horrid baked goods is the best way to make a good first impression.
posted by Harpocrates at 12:41 PM on March 2, 2012


Innocent question: the Globe & Mail article mentions the Norwegian krona in passing as a less-palatable alternative for Iceland to the Canadian dollar... I know there's an old colonial-historical issue there, but is there another reason why that wouldn't be a better match?
posted by psoas at 12:54 PM on March 2, 2012


Jesus H Christ, about 75% of threads with Canadian content invariably boil down to a discussion about poutine. Is that all we're good for to you people?

OK don't answer that.
posted by jimmythefish at 1:14 PM on March 2, 2012 [2 favorites]


If we have to have tighter economic integration with a small island nation that has a unique cultural identity and major upcoming economic challenges facing it, could that please be Cuba?
posted by Jaybo at 1:26 PM on March 2, 2012


Why not both? It's not like this is going to cost us much. Heck having a country use canadian dollars is like them giving us an interest free loan.
posted by Mitheral at 1:35 PM on March 2, 2012


Jesus H Christ, about 75% of threads with Canadian content invariably boil down to a discussion about poutine. Is that all we're good for to you people?

Sheesh, ok, let's change the topic to something not so stereotypically Canadian.


Who do you like for the Stanley Cup this year?
posted by never used baby shoes at 1:51 PM on March 2, 2012 [1 favorite]


Jesus H Christ, about 75% of threads with Canadian content invariably boil down to a discussion about poutine. Is that all we're good for to you people?

Look, it's like having a cousin that you don't see that often, who always brings a super-delicious dish to the family gatherings. The topic of conversation is almost always going to include that dish.
posted by Celsius1414 at 1:57 PM on March 2, 2012 [1 favorite]


Living in Victoria, I've never ever eaten poutine, although I do remember growing up feeling some proud about our own godawfully bad local delicay, Nanaimo Bars. They are a microcosm of everything that is wrong with English Canada.
posted by KokuRyu at 2:04 PM on March 2, 2012


Who do you like for the Stanley Cup this year?

The Leafs are totally going to come through this year.






no they're not
posted by one more dead town's last parade at 2:09 PM on March 2, 2012


They could all just move to Gimli, MB. No one would notice.

Why not Reykjavik, MB? It'd be even more fitting. (Never mind the fact there are probably, like, 10 people there.)

Nanaimo Bars. They are a microcosm of everything that is wrong with English Canada.

Explain yourself.
posted by asnider at 2:12 PM on March 2, 2012


A turgid mixture of fat and sugar
posted by KokuRyu at 2:21 PM on March 2, 2012


Seems like a good idea, if Iceland wants to go through with it. It wouldn't hurt Canada at all, and maybe our stable currency could help them.

jimmythefish: "...during a Hockey Night in Rekyavik simulcast."

This... actually sounds pretty cool! Iceland should have a team in the NHL. They'd be pretty far from the other teams, but it would give the league a more international flavour.
posted by Kevin Street at 2:31 PM on March 2, 2012 [1 favorite]


A turgid delicious mixture of fat and sugar
posted by asnider at 2:41 PM on March 2, 2012


"If we have to have tighter economic integration with a small island nation that has a unique cultural identity and major upcoming economic challenges facing it, could that please be Cuba?"

Cuba could be next. Maybe we could build an economic block of islands, or something. That's worth at least 6 extra armies per turn in Risk.
posted by Kevin Street at 2:43 PM on March 2, 2012 [2 favorites]


Their milk comes in bags!

Bags!
posted by banshee at 2:58 PM on March 2, 2012


Since the discussion came up anyway.. Speaking as a western canadian who recently visited Quebec and had actual poutine for the first time.. I GET IT NOW, OH MY GOD IS IT AWESOME.
But do not mock nanaimo bars, nothing can be wrong in something with that caloric density.
posted by Pink Fuzzy Bunny at 3:00 PM on March 2, 2012


Step 1. "Adopt" the Canadian Loonie.
Step 2. Modify Tim Horton's store signs by adding extra umlauts.
Step 3. Install Bjork as next Governor General.
Step 4. Welcome to NEW ICELAND!

It's a plot goddammit. Wake up and smell the döæble-döæble.
posted by spoobnooble II: electric bugaboo at 3:03 PM on March 2, 2012 [3 favorites]


"...leading some to point out the coin is the Queen with a bear behind."

The Queen's "behind" is on every note anyway.
posted by Auz at 3:43 PM on March 2, 2012


Cuba could be next. Maybe we could build an economic block of islands, or something. That's worth at least 6 extra armies per turn in Risk.

We should also finally conclude our takeover of the Turks & Caicos Islands.
posted by Kabanos at 3:48 PM on March 2, 2012 [3 favorites]


I have no idea why pouting always comes up. True Canadians know Newfie fries are where it is at. why yes, I did have them for dinner twice this week, why do you ask?
posted by saucysault at 3:53 PM on March 2, 2012


The new national dish can be fermented shark poutine.
posted by acb at 5:19 PM on March 2, 2012 [1 favorite]


Iceland should have a team in the NHL. They'd be pretty far from the other teams, but it would give the league a more international flavour.

It might finally attract Nordic players to the NHL.
posted by riruro at 5:37 PM on March 2, 2012


As an American who just spent an incredible 2 weeks in Iceland, we are making an serious mistake if we let the Canucks get this paradise instead of us.

Oh, wait. We are out of cash, too. Crap.
posted by webhund at 5:48 PM on March 2, 2012 [1 favorite]


our own godawfully bad local delicay, Nanaimo Bars.

The cafe at my work (in Seattle) sells these. Now I know who to blame for their existence
>:[
posted by jacalata at 6:56 PM on March 2, 2012 [1 favorite]


I have no idea why pouting always comes up.

Canadians are very emo
posted by KokuRyu at 8:53 PM on March 2, 2012 [2 favorites]


WinnipegDragon: They could all just move to Gimli, MB. No one would notice.

This is a cool 3 minute BBC documentary about Gimli--Close-Up: The Canadian Town Known as New Iceland. Apparently with the economic meltdown in Iceland, the town is experiencing a brand new wave of Icelandic immigrants.

Come on over, Icelandic people! I enjoy your ethereal music and your gritty mystery novels.
posted by hurdy gurdy girl at 9:11 PM on March 2, 2012


Still confused as to how Iceland was "doing it right" by blowing off the bankers but are now looking to denominate in loonies to save themselves from the damage caused by paying off the bankers.

I mean, maybe they were. Austerity has certainly killed Greece's ability to pay anything back and only made them a bigger and bigger boat anchor on Europe. But Iceland is such a small economy they're easy to throw on an economic siding.

Also, Skillet here in Seattle serves poutine. It's OK.
posted by dw at 9:48 PM on March 2, 2012 [1 favorite]


I, for one, welcome our new Icelandic underlords.
posted by moneyjane at 11:24 PM on March 2, 2012


I'm waiting for the first country having hassles with their messed up currency to give the bitcoin a go
posted by zog at 6:57 AM on March 3, 2012


Winter is coming.
posted by srboisvert at 7:13 AM on March 3, 2012 [1 favorite]


True Canadians know Newfie fries are where it is at.

I love a Mess as much as the next guy, but poutine on wedge is where it's at.
posted by asnider at 10:18 AM on March 3, 2012


I would just like to take this opportunity to point out that there is such a thing as Siggi's "skyr" that is sold in Stop & Shop and I bought some recently being "OH MAN! SKYR!" and it sucked. It sucked hard.

And then I read the label more closely: "Icelandic style skyr yogurt."

Skyr =/ yogurt.

Just a public service announcement for those who would be easily duped by such potential deliciousness. It is not delicious. Not as delicious as *real skyr* anyway.

Unless, of course, you're an unsuspecting baby. Unsuspecting babies gobble that shit right up.
posted by sonika at 3:20 PM on March 3, 2012


PS: Skyr.is exists in Iceland. It's not a knock off. It's not the best, but it's not a rip-off either.
posted by sonika at 3:23 PM on March 3, 2012


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