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Puppsy Blue
April 10, 2012 9:13 AM   Subscribe

Dave makes leather bags. He's passionate about it. He wants to make the best bags possible. Or as he says it, "I wanted it to be made so well that my grandkids would fight over it while I was still warm in the grave." His bags are tough (QT). How confident is he in the quality of his bags? He has links to his rivals on his website. Bag owners are encouraged to send in their own photographs of them in action. His bags carry a 100 year warranty (damage caused by crocodiles and elephants not covered). But the real reason to visit his site is to read his moving tribute in Memory of his dog Blue.
posted by ColdChef (147 comments total) 60 users marked this as a favorite

 
Saddleback bags/products are amazing and I've read various first hand accounts from forum users that I trust that they do indeed live up to the hype. Sadly they are priced to match... One day, one day...
posted by RolandOfEld at 9:18 AM on April 10, 2012 [1 favorite]


"Pigskin is the second strongest hide in the world, second to kangaroo."

Just let that statement sink in a moment.
posted by robocop is bleeding at 9:21 AM on April 10, 2012


I liked his tribute to his pup. 60 puppies is pretty irresponsible, though. Neuter or spay your pets, folks. There are plenty of dogs and cats for everyone already.
posted by maxwelton at 9:24 AM on April 10, 2012 [8 favorites]


I want a Saddleback satchel like nobody's business.

And it was a dog not too unlike Blue that turned me from a Cat Person into a Dog Person. So thanks for this.
posted by pts at 9:25 AM on April 10, 2012


I bought myself a couple of their wallets at Xmas. Beautifully made and great value -- plus the people who work at the company were delightful to deal with, despite the fact that I was only spending a tiny amount of money with them.
posted by PeterMcDermott at 9:26 AM on April 10, 2012


I bought my husband one of their wallets after scouring the internet for a wallet that was just, you know, a WALLET, that didn't cost a million dollars and wouldn't fall apart in a year. He's had it for two years now and it is starting to develop some really awesome character. Every time I look at their website, I'm like "one of each please!"
posted by KathrynT at 9:30 AM on April 10, 2012


Those are very nice bags.

1 full-sized interior pocket for handguns or power cords, which can be pressed flat when not in use

That delights me quite a bit. You know... whichever.
posted by thehmsbeagle at 9:33 AM on April 10, 2012 [2 favorites]


How did anyone get away with spending a tiny amount of money with them? I paid $500 for mine several years ago. It's holding up nicely, but the cost is a serious bit of business.
posted by uraniumwilly at 9:35 AM on April 10, 2012


Oh god, that site is full of Papyrus.
posted by elizardbits at 9:36 AM on April 10, 2012 [5 favorites]


How is this not an ad?
posted by diorist at 9:37 AM on April 10, 2012 [9 favorites]


What makes the pigskin so tough?

"With some pigs we do use waterboarding and sensory deprivation techniques previous to slaughtering them."
posted by robocop is bleeding at 9:39 AM on April 10, 2012 [1 favorite]


What's wrong with it being an ad?
posted by Quonab at 9:40 AM on April 10, 2012


I have a small bag, which I got for my birthday. I love it. I'm also a little afraid to use it because it's so nice. Yes, I know that's dumb.
posted by rtha at 9:40 AM on April 10, 2012


By the way, if you ever wonder who has the more unconditional love for you, put your spouse and your dog in the trunk of the car for one hour. When you open it, who's still happy to see you?

true dat
posted by the young rope-rider at 9:41 AM on April 10, 2012 [9 favorites]


How is this not an ad?

I have no stake in these bags. Don't own one. Don't know anyone who owns one. Found the website and discovered it to be snarkily irreverent and was moved by the tribute to his dog. I think most online retailers should have this kind of a sense of humor and personal touch to the products they sell. Not promoting the product as much as I am the cool way they're presented.
posted by ColdChef at 9:42 AM on April 10, 2012 [3 favorites]


It is an ad. That whole "history of the company" story in the first link is an excellent example of making a brand narrative (whether the details are true is irrelevant, it is still a perfect example of brand narrative). All the details, from the bullfighting to the guns to the kangaroo balls in the Australia photo establish a brand image of rugged masculinity, designed to reassure the guy who wants to carry a purse but feels like it wouldn't be macho to carry a purse.
posted by idiopath at 9:42 AM on April 10, 2012 [13 favorites]


Inspirational case study.
posted by Foci for Analysis at 9:43 AM on April 10, 2012


Well, that's a $530 backpack, all right. Yup.
posted by gurple at 9:43 AM on April 10, 2012 [2 favorites]


Please take the is-this-an-ad-or-not fight to meTa.
posted by rtha at 9:44 AM on April 10, 2012 [5 favorites]


How did anyone get away with spending a tiny amount of money with them?

Their wallets start from about $20
posted by PeterMcDermott at 9:44 AM on April 10, 2012


Their wallets look pretty reasonable and the husband goes through about a wallet a year. Think I just found him a present. Thanks for the link, ColdChef!
posted by emjaybee at 9:44 AM on April 10, 2012 [1 favorite]


How is this not an ad?

Ya'know I thought the same thing when this first came up, then I realized that I'd love hearing any discourse on this company or their products because they seem, while still wordly and probably a bit falsified (who isn't?), legit and awesome to me. So I shrugged and went on once I saw that ColdShef didn't show any signs of being a shill for the company in question.

Though this is the last I'll say on this side track since I'm guessing the mods are going to say their usual piece: MetaTalk is the place for that discussion to happen.
posted by RolandOfEld at 9:46 AM on April 10, 2012


I've used the thinner Saddleback leather briefcase for several years now as my daily tote and I still get compliments on it from time to time. It was my first serious gift to my myself and how I justified its price.

Since owning the bag, I've travelled to several countries with it, through 30+ humid Asian heat on one end and -30 Canadian cold on the other and it's held up great. Scratches only add to the character of the bag and make it more worthy of being a hand-me-down in the future. I really do expect this bag to last that long.

The only downside is that even the thin briefcase weights a bit and lugging a heavy leather bag through the heat sucks.

[Did not get paid for this, I swear!]
posted by tksh at 9:48 AM on April 10, 2012


Though this is the last I'll say on this side track since I'm guessing the mods are going to say their usual piece: MetaTalk is the place for that discussion to happen.

Indeed. Thank you. Linking to things that are in some sense advertising is not in and of itself a problem; anybody who wants to discuss the details can do so not-in-the-the-middle-of-the-thread.
posted by cortex at 9:48 AM on April 10, 2012 [1 favorite]


Interesting stuff, but I wish he'd talked more about how the Mexican craftspeople because, wow, that's some beautiful work.
posted by smirkette at 9:50 AM on April 10, 2012


I just started The Long Goodbye and Marlowe talks about a pig skin leather briefcase. I never realized leather could look so good until I saw these bags. Now the book actually becomes clearer!
posted by Carillon at 9:52 AM on April 10, 2012


Oh my God I just found my doctoral graduation present to myself (if the company's still around in 7 years...) I love, love, love leather bags and I am practically salivating over these.
posted by WidgetAlley at 9:52 AM on April 10, 2012


Can anyone who bought a bag in the past comment as to how their prices have changed over the years since? I'm wondering how their material costs/marketing decisions have changed (if any) over that time frame.

I did hear somewhere that the design of one of their main bags had changed in some not-necessarily trivial, not-necessarily non-trivial manner. Potentially for the worse. Maybe it was a strap change or something?

Also these commonly show up on ebay and seem to garner high prices on the resale market so no real chance of scoring a huge discount there. That said something about their durability to me....
posted by RolandOfEld at 9:52 AM on April 10, 2012


The company has been mentioned several times in Ask Mefi to the ever present "help me find a bag" question. I have been debating buying the bag for years. Also, ColdChef, seems to be a good person so I am not too worried about this post.
posted by jadepearl at 9:54 AM on April 10, 2012


I was assuming that coldchef was a leather supplier for the tougher than pigskin models...
posted by Forktine at 9:55 AM on April 10, 2012 [10 favorites]


RolandOfElf: I remember paying low $400, five or so years ago? I see that the same bag (thin briefcase) still sells for low $400 today.

And wow, I can't believe I managed to convince myself to spend $400+ on a leather bag back then.
posted by tksh at 9:59 AM on April 10, 2012


Warning - Saddleback Leather bags are addictive.

I bought a waterbag for my husband for a wedding gift. Then a wallet for Christmas. Now he also has the toiletry bag and briefcase. We got married in October. Yep, all that in just 6 months.

I will say they are excellent quality, smell wonderful and are aging well. He really thinks that his children will "fight over them when he's dead."
posted by kmccorm at 10:02 AM on April 10, 2012


I'm amused how quickly man bags went from a joke on shows like Friends and Seinfeld during the 90s, to a de rigueur accessory just a few years later a la Jack Bauer.
posted by bobo123 at 10:13 AM on April 10, 2012


I like Saddleback bags. But when I bought my own bag (a present for earning my MA) I bought one from here. Custom Hide. The website is not much in terms of design, but the bag I got was amazing. AMAZING. Bombproof, gorgeous, get compliments on it wherever I go.

I got the "Scholar," but with some mods. This, but in black with nickel hardware.

It is gorgeous, and slightly less expensive than Saddleback and others.
posted by exlotuseater at 10:13 AM on April 10, 2012 [7 favorites]


The tribute to his dog, while very sweet, bothers me in a couple of ways. First, the whole "my dog got bitches pregnant all around the world, how cool is that" is really jerky and irresponsible. And the joke he closes with about locking your wife and your dog in the trunk of your car? Yeah, that's not funny either and totally destroys any goodwill created by the story of him and his dog.
posted by jbickers at 10:14 AM on April 10, 2012 [15 favorites]


The only downside is that even the thin briefcase weights a bit and lugging a heavy leather bag through the heat sucks.

I'm a luggage fetishist. I spend more on bags than I care to admit -- and this is the only thing that puts me off buying one of their bags.

There's nothing worse than spending a whole day travelling about and having to suffer a miserable aching shoulder at the end of it. It doesn't matter how nice or how well made a bag is, if it's going to make my shoulder ache, it isn't worth it.
posted by PeterMcDermott at 10:17 AM on April 10, 2012 [1 favorite]


I own both a wallet and a briefcase from these guys. They are some of the nicest things I own. Huge recommendation.

And yes, the story of Blue is well-written and tear-inducing.
posted by Bookhouse at 10:19 AM on April 10, 2012


Yeah, the leather biz in Juarez is funny. My sister married a designer in LA and they'd go down to Juarez to get leather supplies. Once they picked up a huge tub full of cow's teeth. I mean front teeth, 5 inches long, root and all. They made a few "teeth belts," imagine something like an ammo belt worn as an accessory, except with white cow's teeth, and lashed together with black leather strips. They were hugely successful and sold for insane amounts of money, but they were kinda disgusting so they didn't want to make any more. They didn't want to be famous for that sort of thing.
posted by charlie don't surf at 10:19 AM on April 10, 2012 [1 favorite]


This forum post mentions saddleback lining them with pigskin as a "step above" the competition, I wonder how legit that is and/or if Saddleback is really that much better than other "full grain leather" bag makers. They certainly market their stuff better, at least to me, than other places I see similar leatherworks for sale.
posted by RolandOfEld at 10:21 AM on April 10, 2012


I'm amused how quickly man bags went from a joke on shows like Friends and Seinfeld during the 90s, to a de rigueur accessory just a few years later a la Jack Bauer.

I never thought a dude carrying a bag was odd or feminine. Indiana Jones carries one, so I grew up thinking bags were bad ass.
posted by Maaik at 10:23 AM on April 10, 2012 [1 favorite]


The tribute to his dog is great. There's a book along very similar lines, based on real-life, by Louis de Bernieres called Red Dog (incidentally, one of Red Dog's nicknames is Bluey or Blue) set in the rural West Australia. A bit of a tear-jerker, but a must-read if you're a dog person.
posted by Drexen at 10:25 AM on April 10, 2012


-the
posted by Drexen at 10:26 AM on April 10, 2012


I have the satchel (medium, I think) and it's a perfect fit for an iPad. It goes into the little side section and I throw other stuff in the main section. I use it every day and it's completely indestructible. It is a bit heavy, though, as all these bags are. Highly recommended.

My next purchase is going to be the bull leather belt, because I never want to buy a belt again.
posted by Huck500 at 10:26 AM on April 10, 2012


One of the examples of things not covered by warranty is "if you take it shark diving in salt water and a rivet corrodes."

Which, to me, suggests the question "Why don't they use stainless steel to make the rivets?"

Anyone know? Does stainless steel and leather not play well together?
posted by Edogy at 10:34 AM on April 10, 2012


Does stainless steel and leather not play well together?

It certainly would look out of place, that's one thing.
posted by RolandOfEld at 10:37 AM on April 10, 2012


It is very well marketed. For instance, having every single product have a folksy YouTube video demo is just a step beyond most rivals.
posted by smackfu at 10:37 AM on April 10, 2012


jbickers: "The tribute to his dog, while very sweet, bothers me in a couple of ways."

It's all to service the macho brand image I referenced above. The casual misogyny gains him cred with his target audience. Nothing is accidental here.
posted by idiopath at 10:39 AM on April 10, 2012 [5 favorites]


I guess stainless rivets would look ok with black leather, for the biker look. But not for the classy, brown stuff that I associate them with. Plus I'm guessing that even stainless rivets might not hold up well to saltwater exposure since it might be behind the rivet and cause long term damage, no matter how much you rinse/clean it. Just speculating.
posted by RolandOfEld at 10:40 AM on April 10, 2012


And the joke he closes with about locking your wife and your dog in the trunk of your car?I agree. I got pretty tired of him always describing his wife as "hot" throughout. I mean, I'm glad he feels that way, but why do we need to know?
posted by smirkette at 10:41 AM on April 10, 2012 [1 favorite]


If you like these bags this will make you sad.
posted by RolandOfEld at 10:41 AM on April 10, 2012 [1 favorite]


*drool*. Must. Own.
posted by PuppyCat at 10:44 AM on April 10, 2012


As a dog lover, and as someone who fosters dogs, I don't like it one bit. Sixty people all over the world are having to deal with the consequences of his irresponsibility, and he brags about it.
posted by lupus_yonderboy at 10:48 AM on April 10, 2012 [1 favorite]


Haters got to hate.
posted by smackfu at 10:53 AM on April 10, 2012


Unable to swallow the pricetag, I decided to learn to make my own bags. So Thanks Saddleback for the inspiration!
posted by TheCoug at 10:56 AM on April 10, 2012 [1 favorite]


MetaTalk
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 10:57 AM on April 10, 2012


By the way, if you ever wonder who has the more unconditional love for you, put your spouse and your dog in the trunk of the car for one hour. When you open it, who's still happy to see you?
uh, what?
posted by empath at 10:58 AM on April 10, 2012


man nothing makes me want to buy expensive-ass luggage more than olde worlde misogyny

fuck yeah
posted by beefetish at 10:59 AM on April 10, 2012 [2 favorites]


In his Puppies for Tacos link, it doesn't appear that he is just letting his go at any female that comes around. I don't know enough about dog breeding in Mexico to say he is following normal conventions, but I wouldn't say I know enough to call him irresponsible, either.
posted by Quonab at 11:00 AM on April 10, 2012


I have one of their briefcases, and while it's rugged, roomy and attractive, it also weighs a frickin' ton. I've been using it for work, and it's almost as if anything I put in it experiences a multiplier effect regarding its weight. For anyone considering purchasing one of their bigger bags, please take the weight seriously—it's a nontrivial factor in your day-to-day comfort.

Also, the owner sticks a minibook of Bible quotes in each bag, which is his prerogative, but I found it offputting. Plus, the multiplier effect means it weighs as much as a volume of the OED.
posted by the sobsister at 11:00 AM on April 10, 2012 [4 favorites]


maxwelton: "60 puppies is pretty irresponsible, though."

They say it's pigskin. But really, there's nothing softer than a cutesy wootsy puppy.

Misogyny jokes and proselytizing. Pass, thanks.
posted by zarq at 11:05 AM on April 10, 2012 [2 favorites]


He includes bible quotes in the bags he ships? Game over. No business from me.
posted by lazaruslong at 11:06 AM on April 10, 2012 [3 favorites]


Christian? Well I certainly won't buy from him!
posted by smackfu at 11:09 AM on April 10, 2012 [1 favorite]


I find that Cordura also develops a fine hand and patina with age, and is far lighter, more weatherproof and accommodating than leather.
On the other hand I've never had to stop a knife, or a lunging Cayman with any of my luggage, nor do I buy my accessories with an eye towards what sort of squabble they will cause amongst future beneficiaries.
posted by Flashman at 11:10 AM on April 10, 2012 [1 favorite]


If he's putting bible quotes in his bags that's new. None were in mine.
posted by uraniumwilly at 11:12 AM on April 10, 2012 [3 favorites]


Yeah, I didn't get any when I bought a belt recently. A very thick, fancy belt that cost far too much but was a treat.
posted by smackfu at 11:12 AM on April 10, 2012


CAREFUL! If you avoid products solely because of Biblical influence, you will never enjoy an In and Out Burger.
posted by ColdChef at 11:15 AM on April 10, 2012 [1 favorite]


If he's putting bible quotes in his bags that's new. None were in mine.

I got one in mine. I threw it away, along with all the other papers it came with. I somehow managed to avoid being converted.
posted by Bookhouse at 11:20 AM on April 10, 2012 [2 favorites]


I just ordered a wallet for my husband. His 30th birthday is on the 20th, so I can tell him that his wallet will be around long after he's dead.
posted by chiababe at 11:21 AM on April 10, 2012 [1 favorite]


CAREFUL! If you avoid products solely because of Biblical influence, you will never enjoy an In and Out Burger.

I know. :( It's like the opposite of the devil's bargain. But then I wash down my atheist guilt with a delicious milkshake.
posted by book 'em dano at 11:27 AM on April 10, 2012


i mean pithy one-liners aside i think the fetish for hella overengineered "olde-worlde" bags is really interesting. it's like classy obsession with north face jackets etc!
posted by beefetish at 11:28 AM on April 10, 2012


I used to have an electric razor until I realized that I like old school straight razors and safety razors a whole lot better. Ditto for my '62 Beetle, a car I can work on/enjoy instead of a new CheVollvo LumaFalconette. I'll admit it does seem odd to some but to each his own.

Saddleback-esque goods often happen to qualify as BIFL and if people are seeing the value in that in this disposable society we live in, all the better.
posted by RolandOfEld at 11:34 AM on April 10, 2012 [1 favorite]


I appreciate a good dog story as much as anyone and will cry at the drop of a hat, but I wasn't particularly impressed by this one. From the congratulatory - look at me, I put a page about my dog on my professional site! - to yeah, that trunk of the car comment. As for the puppies, meh. Even if they were all "on purpose" (doubtful), it's still irresponsible. imo.
posted by Glinn at 11:38 AM on April 10, 2012


This forum post mentions saddleback lining them with pigskin as a "step above" the competition, I wonder how legit that is and/or if Saddleback is really that much better than other "full grain leather" bag makers.

They list Vuitton in their links to competitors, but they're not even in the big leagues with those products. This briefcase is my current object of lust, although this bag is closer to Saddleback's style.

But then, I'm not in the big leagues with those products either. I don't have that kind of money to drop on a briefcase.
posted by charlie don't surf at 11:48 AM on April 10, 2012 [1 favorite]


As a future archaeologist, my lust for one of these bags exceeds the total sum of human history.
posted by TungstenChef at 11:48 AM on April 10, 2012 [1 favorite]


heh heh yeah buying one really expensive bag exempts me from being part of "this disposable society"
posted by beefetish at 11:50 AM on April 10, 2012


I guess no one here ever put a male spouse in their trunk for an hour just to see if he still loved you. Typical metafilter.
posted by the young rope-rider at 11:50 AM on April 10, 2012 [9 favorites]


I have their largest briefcase as it was the only one I could find to carry my huge laptop. (I bought and returned two cases previously.) It's heavy and with the 9 pound laptop I tend to list to one side. Nevertheless, it's a great case and my kids have already planned a duel to see who gets it when I'm dead.

Fair warning, for the first few days it smelled like a tannery. That faded and I've had zero problems with it. I can cram a huge amount of stuff in it for traveling although you can't really expect to stow it under your seat on a plane.
posted by Sculthorpe at 11:51 AM on April 10, 2012 [1 favorite]


I guess no one here ever put a male spouse in their trunk for an hour just to see if he still loved you. Typical metafilter.

Road trip to visit Brandon Blatcher!
posted by rtha at 11:56 AM on April 10, 2012 [1 favorite]


beefetish: Nope, buying one does not a "get out of jail free card" make. But having the desire to pass something on to your kids or retire it after 50 years of stalwart service certainly puts you one step further down that road than people that buy X number of bags in the meantime and have nothing to show for it in the end.

Sure, that sort of thinking does have a bit of a gotcha side to it, but I know what side of it I prefer to err on and wish everyone had the means to make whatever decision they wished instead of the all too often case of where they have no option other than the 'cheap boots' mentioned in that link.
posted by RolandOfEld at 11:58 AM on April 10, 2012 [2 favorites]


I find that Cordura also develops a fine hand and patina with age, and is far lighter, more weatherproof and accommodating than leather.

Yeah, I'm all about the Maxpedition bags at the moment.
posted by PeterMcDermott at 12:03 PM on April 10, 2012 [2 favorites]


roland i'm mostly being a jerk for jerk sakes here because i own a lot of overengineered and/or old stuff that i thrash and i basically never shut up about how old stuff stands to thrashing better. but i also feel like there is some weird cultural stuff floating around the idea of Buying It For Life or all the Shop Class as Soulcraft, oh my god, old stuff is intrinsically superior kind of attitude. and the kind of people more willing to obsess over old stuff. don't know.
posted by beefetish at 12:11 PM on April 10, 2012 [2 favorites]


The little videos illustrating the various products are quite entertaining, as is the whole website (the gratuitous misogyny is a bit grating, a little too heavy-handed). Thanks, Cold Chef. This guy seems to have figured out how to have his cake and eat it too.
posted by Anitanola at 12:15 PM on April 10, 2012


there is some weird cultural stuff floating around the idea of Buying It For Life or all the Shop Class as Soulcraft

I'll grant that, but I wouldn't go so far as to say it's a bad thing either. Kinda how I feel about higher MPG cars becoming more prevalent here in the US. People aren't buying them because it's the environmentally sound thing to do necessarily, though it usually is. Sales are increasing because of higher gas prices and, to a lesser degree, 'hip factor'/weird cultural stuff. I'll take the subsequent improvements, any day of the week.
posted by RolandOfEld at 12:16 PM on April 10, 2012


Since owning the bag, I've travelled to several countries with it, through 30+ humid Asian heat on one end and -30 Canadian cold on the other and it's held up great. ... The only downside is that even the thin briefcase weights a bit and lugging a heavy leather bag through the heat sucks.

The thing is that a bag you travel with should be durable, light, and have lots of individual compartments for your various accessories that you need in arm's reach. Also, being waterproof helps.

Saddleback fails these requirements. There's a difference between what Saddleback is marketing itself as, with all of those pictures of being toted around in exotic locations, and what it can be used for, when it comes to practicality. I'm glad I wasn't lugging one of those things around on my back while hiking in the Bulgarian mountains for two days.
posted by deanc at 12:50 PM on April 10, 2012 [1 favorite]


but i also feel like there is some weird cultural stuff floating around the idea of Buying It For Life or all the Shop Class as Soulcraft, oh my god, old stuff is intrinsically superior kind of attitude.

Well, disposable cheap stuff is ubiquitous. So it's no surprise that there is a certain cachet to finding and owning expensive stuff that's overengineered and long lasting.
posted by deanc at 12:53 PM on April 10, 2012



there is some weird cultural stuff floating around the idea of Buying It For Life or all the Shop Class as Soulcraft


Ya, you betcha. It's especially hilarious because while some people who buy all this stuff will keep it forever, a lot of people will give it away, sell it, or stick it in the basement til it gets mildewed as soon as the next big thing comes along. (Assuming capitalism and the planet survive long enough for there to be a next big thing.) The vast majority of people who spend a lot of time reading fashion blogs on the internet are not, realistically, buying anything for life. It's a marketing ploy to get people to spend more and a displacement of class anxiety - you're performing being the kind of WASPy, old money person who buys only the very best as a matter of course and who will always be able either to wear precisely what they please or replace on a whim. So no need to worry about buying something very expensive that screams Trad Revival of 2012; if you need something very expensive that screams Gothy Corporate Matrix Revival of 2015, you'll be able to drop another $500 without any problem.

It really is about the anxiety over who you are - all this BIFL stuff is a way of answering the "am I more than what I buy and wear?" question without asking people to stop spending a lot of cash. But even a closet full of English country shoes and vintage leather weekenders is still, at the end of the day, just a bunch of things rather than a soul.

(Also, really, "your kids will fight over it when you're dead"? There's not a thing in the world that would lead me to be so gauche as to fight over it after my parents' deaths. It's on beyond trashy to quarrel over the possessions of the dead, and I confidently expect to be prostrate with grief. Should I have children and nice leathergoods, I would not want to leave anything to them in a way that would promote bad feeling.

I wonder how much death and how many wills this dude has dealt with? It's like that phrase "[blah blah] should die in a fire". I actually lost a friend who died incredibly tragically trying to rescue people in a fire. Lived experience changes up your whole worldview on internet funsters.)
posted by Frowner at 12:55 PM on April 10, 2012 [11 favorites]


There's a book along very similar lines, based on real-life, by Louis de Bernieres called Red Dog (incidentally, one of Red Dog's nicknames is Bluey or Blue) set in the rural West Australia.

Bluey is a traditional Australian nickname for a redhead.
posted by zamboni at 1:03 PM on April 10, 2012 [1 favorite]


Valid points about alot of purchasers of this type of thing and I totally agree with one token reservation, my grandma's cornbread pan, that I use oh-so-often, has a ton of soul associated with it. Everyone knows that's what makes the cornbread (or biscuits if we're feeling frisky) taste so good.
posted by RolandOfEld at 1:04 PM on April 10, 2012


Best briefcase ever...
posted by mfoight at 1:08 PM on April 10, 2012


you're performing being the kind of WASPy, old money person who buys only the very best as a matter of course and who will always be able either to wear precisely what they please or replace on a whim

In fairness, the WASPy, old money person has inherited his money and has only that much money at his disposal, and no more (because he's more or less unqualified for real work). In this aesthetic, he has only his one set of tailored clothes, possibly including clothes he inherited from his father. That's the reason for the leather patches on the elbows of his sport coat-- because the elbows have worn out, but he can't just go out and buy a new jacket.

I'm not saying that this is how it plays out for those attempting to emulate this aesthetic, but the sales pitch of that aesthetic is not a false one.

I also can't help but think the criticism of this trend is just evidence that people who get sanctimonious about consumerism cannot be satisfied. They cluck-cluck about people who buy disposable stuff and then "just throw it away!" And they get similarly self-righteous towards people who change their habits towards durable "for life" goods that address their personal needs.
posted by deanc at 1:13 PM on April 10, 2012 [3 favorites]


And they get similarly self-righteous towards people who change their habits towards durable "for life" goods that address their personal needs.

No, they don't. They just think it's funny when people justify buying a pair of $500 Aldens this year by saying that they are shoes "for life" and then mothball them when the next big trend comes along. Which people do. I've been, as we say, to this particular fashion show before.

The number of trendy people who will insist that they were "always" into something (selvege-edged jeans in the 90s was the first time that I noticed this)....well, those people are legion, even when photos exist of their various previous fashion incarnations. I'm sure these are very nice bags and all, and I'm sure that some people will buy them and carry them for a long time, but I am deeply skeptical of ethical fashion conversion stories.

There was a very similar fashion movement in the seventies - I have an old collection of fashion essays from Vogue which details it. And everyone said it was about timeless values and craftsmanship - but it wasn't, it was just another fad. And all that "timeless" stuff looks really 1970s now. It may be lovely and still have a lot of wear in it, but it is of its time.

People are free to buy whatever they like, of course, and it's nice to buy things such that your money goes to the craftsperson and not to Walmart. But individual consumer choices - expensive individual consumer choices - are not what drives substantial social policy. It's great that a handful of people can make adequate livings doing non-alienated labor, but let's not kid ourselves - if our only moves toward an equitable society involve buying expensive leathergoods, then it's mere gestures. There is a ton of fashion history which illustrates this - it's not a new thing.

Buy what you like, I'm saying, but don't delude yourself.
posted by Frowner at 1:26 PM on April 10, 2012 [5 favorites]


That said, the Manhattan Portage bag I bought in 2007, with its canvas construction and plastic clips has lasted just fine, despite being used by me every single day, including for travel. No $500 cost, 12 pounds of leather, or unwieldy leather straps necessary.

I'm also a bit weirded out by people who publish long sentimental eulogies to their pets. And of course it was a black lab-- pretty much the typical kind of dog a male suburbanite would own (pit bull-- too poor/ghetto. German Shepherd-- too paramilitary. Smaller dogs -- not masculine enough). It is just a little too perfect. Like, he loves pets, but he loves the precise sort of pet everyone can relate to. And he was "man enough" not to bother neutering it.

(and I say all of this as someone who's been in the market for a leather bag for a while and just biding my time until I find the right one. I did seriously consider Saddleback for a while, but their bags are wrong solution to the problem they purport to solve)
posted by deanc at 1:31 PM on April 10, 2012


frowner thank you for putting that more sensibly than i could, all handwaving about "y'all want to be some kind of english country gentleman that exists only in j. peterman catalogs" which is pithy but not useful

deanc, i manhattan portage bags are the JAM
posted by beefetish at 1:33 PM on April 10, 2012


Some of you sure like overthinking a nice leather bag.

I think the suitcases look pretty damn sharp, and am considering buying one. The briefcases would be more appealing if I didn't suspect they would fail the carry-on baggage size test.
posted by Sternmeyer at 1:35 PM on April 10, 2012 [2 favorites]


I think pet obituaries are more prevalent on the internet than human obituaries. It's come up on Metafilter before, but still turn to The Last Photograph of Cat when I'm in need of a shot of raw emotion.
posted by qxntpqbbbqxl at 1:41 PM on April 10, 2012 [1 favorite]


(Also, really, "your kids will fight over it when you're dead"? There's not a thing in the world that would lead me to be so gauche as to fight over it after my parents' deaths. It's on beyond trashy to quarrel over the possessions of the dead, and I confidently expect to be prostrate with grief. Should I have children and nice leathergoods, I would not want to leave anything to them in a way that would promote bad feeling.

Let me perhaps suggest that it's meant in jest and that he doesn't really intend for family squabbles to form over his leathergoods.
posted by ColdChef at 2:09 PM on April 10, 2012 [8 favorites]


Though perhaps it was really occurring here and there and they thought it might be fun to run with, again in jest, not in a "Let's make your kids hate each other and duel over who gets the piece of dead cow pops carried around for 40 years" kind of way.
posted by RolandOfEld at 2:13 PM on April 10, 2012


frowner thank you for putting that more sensibly than i could, all handwaving about "y'all want to be some kind of english country gentleman that exists only in j. peterman catalogs" which is pithy but not useful

Except that your explanation for your comments was essentially, "I was totally into overengineered stuff before any of these poseurs!"

I think the suitcases look pretty damn sharp, and am considering buying one.

Really, in this day and age, you would be willing to go back to suitcases that don't have wheels?

Saddleback's products are such a huge violation of "form-follows-function" principles. Their products are marketed for "travel and adventure," and yet are hard to travel with. Their business accessories lack the sort of features that you would need (padding for a laptop, multiple pockets for cell phones, etc.) while looking too rugged to be a professional business accessory. And their interface sucks-- before their videos showcasing their wares, it was almost impossible to get a feel for the relative size of the products, and the poor quality of the videos still makes it a bit difficult.
posted by deanc at 2:20 PM on April 10, 2012 [1 favorite]


Let me perhaps suggest that it's meant in jest and that he doesn't really intend for family squabbles to form over his leathergoods.

I just think it's a gross thing to say. It's one of those things where people haven't thought the reality through, so they think it sounds macho-internet-funny.
posted by Frowner at 2:22 PM on April 10, 2012


I just think it's a gross thing to say.

Fair enough, but as someone who has seen actual families fight at funerals over much less important things as handbags, I found the idea funny.
posted by ColdChef at 2:26 PM on April 10, 2012 [5 favorites]


deanc im pretty sure there's enough overengineered shit out in the world where i can own like a carhartt jacket or what have you and still be weirded out by this kind of thing and the culture surrounding it
posted by beefetish at 2:33 PM on April 10, 2012


It's always the aura of the product that's the thing.

I am incredibly fussy and ridiculous about clothes, for reasons that are reasonable (work, childhood of lack, being queer and wanting to inspire terror rather than 'let's hassle that freak') and frivolous ('ooh, shoes!' 'I wish I had shoes like in that picture'). Sadly, this means that I know myself pretty well - when I eBay stalk the English brogues or the vintage bag (you thought those were just idle examples...), I'm not actually acquiring timeless accessories that I will use forever. Or at least, of the things I buy, a handful will be timeless accessories that I'll use forever and most will get sold on or given away. So I no longer tell myself that I'm buying it for life.

The people I know who really do "buy things for life" very often have incredibly ugly stuff that they wear until it's even uglier. My parents buy for life - that's why even now you can see my mother in my old acid-washed tapered fat-chick jeans from Lane Bryant, circa 1989, even though they're much too big for her. My dad has maybe two sportcoats and he's had them both as long as I can remember, so at least since the mid-eighties. My parents are awesome. And they are living proof that a middle class life simply isn't that hard on a lot of things. Even though the clothes they still have were made in the seventies and eighties before everything got super-cheap, they've still been worn for decades by fairly active people. But because middle class life just isn't that strenuous, those things are fine.

If I were really buying for life rather than for product-aura, I could probably pick up perfectly adequate clothes in poly-cotton blends down at the blue collar workwear store near my house.

What's more, I've loved - absolutely adored and been obsessed by - a broad enough array of products in thirty-some years to realize that it is the aura as much as anything else. Oh, I do like clunky shoes and natural fabrics, but I went through a flared wide-leg phase, and a mary janes-only phase, and a vintage-dresses-only phase, and a big-shirt-and-jeggings phase, and I see my present sub-mod dapper stylings as part of the same trajectory, not as part of hewing ever closer to some underlying 'truth' about myself as revealed through shoes. I no longer need to assert that I "always" wear X or am buying Y to hand down to my heirs, because I don't have to kid myself that I am immune to my era or to commercial blandishments. Nor do I need to site my ethical projects there.

Perhaps I am unique and everyone else has turned overnight into a disciplined consumer whose every purchase is for life, and the 2012 Trad Revival is really a Fukuyama-style End Of Fashion rather than a trend. I guess we'll see.
posted by Frowner at 2:36 PM on April 10, 2012 [4 favorites]


Really, in this day and age, you would be willing to go back to suitcases that don't have wheels?

I've never owned luggage with wheels. My luggage is over thirty years old and has survived dozens of trips across the Atlantic in the possession of both my grandfather and myself. I'll be fine without wheels, I think. Thanks for your concern/mockery, though.
posted by Sternmeyer at 2:41 PM on April 10, 2012


There's not a thing in the world that would lead me to be so gauche as to fight over it

Easy there!
posted by gauche at 2:42 PM on April 10, 2012 [4 favorites]


Counter-Eponysterical?
posted by RolandOfEld at 2:51 PM on April 10, 2012


Fair enough, but as someone who has seen actual families fight at funerals over much less important things as handbags, I found the idea funny.

When my mom's cousin Lloyd died, he left her his piano (Steinway, Model M). She was the only other family member who cared about music as much as he did, and from what I remember, also the only family member who didn't wink-wink-nudge-nudge about his male roommate, whom he'd lived with for 30 years.

My mom was living in Hawaii when Lloyd died in Chicago, and she made arrangements with her mom, who lived not far away, to deal with the transport and storage of the piano. Before that happened, though, cousin Lorraine showed up at Lloyd's apartment and was so angry that she wasn't getting the piano - not that she played, of course, but it would have looked wonderful in her living room - that she took the special bench that went with it. And then wrote my mom a mean letter about how my mom had only stayed close to Lloyd so she could get the piano.

People get crazy.
posted by rtha at 2:56 PM on April 10, 2012 [1 favorite]


Their bags are indeed excellent. I have yet to travel with my duffle bag and not receive multiple compliments from fellow travellers and airport staff. My favorite is the people who say, "Wow. They don't make them like that anymore," and then I get to say, "Actually, they do..."

In fact, I have too many of their bags and have a couple I keep meaning to put on Craigslist (Duffle and Classic Briefcase). If you're in Toronto and looking to buy, memail me.
posted by You Should See the Other Guy at 2:59 PM on April 10, 2012


If he's putting bible quotes in his bags that's new.

It's not new. I've had some of my bags for years and they came with quotes. They're not "part" of the bag--he includes a little paper booklet. They've been in every bag I've ever ordered from him.
posted by You Should See the Other Guy at 3:01 PM on April 10, 2012


Steinway: making the world's finest pianos for your kids to fight over when you're dead for 150 years.
posted by RolandOfEld at 3:02 PM on April 10, 2012 [1 favorite]


I just watched the video for The Beast (Large Duffel Bag)... impressive but how does one lock it? All I see are buckles.
posted by TWinbrook8 at 3:17 PM on April 10, 2012


I got pretty tired of him always describing his wife as "hot" throughout. I mean, I'm glad he feels that way, but why do we need to know?

It's a "Stuff Christian Culture Likes" thing.
posted by deanc at 3:50 PM on April 10, 2012


I own some Saddleback stuff, and it is indeed top quality and worth the money. All the religious crap they pitch is really an annoyance though.
posted by blaneyphoto at 3:52 PM on April 10, 2012


I'm also a bit weirded out by people who publish long sentimental eulogies to their pets.

I'm only weirded out by them when they ring false, like this one does. It's like, he's saying the right things (well, some of them) but not actually feeling anything.

A lovely eulogy I ran into unexpectedly recently is this one. (Have tissues handy). (Warning: blog plays music.) Anyway, when it's really heartfelt you can tell, and it doesn't matter if it's sentimental then.
posted by Glinn at 4:24 PM on April 10, 2012


Was just about to order a nice wallet - $42 is a damn good price for a quality leather wallet - but they must be extremely heavy and in a very big box because apparently it will cost USPS $32.84 to ship it to Australia. Oh well!
posted by tumid dahlia at 4:43 PM on April 10, 2012


The thing is that a bag you travel with should be durable, light, and have lots of individual compartments for your various accessories that you need in arm's reach. Also, being waterproof helps.

To be fair, the Saddleback briefcase is meant for daily commuter use, not for lugging around as carry on luggage while you vacation. And it's well designed for that provided your shoulder can carry the five pounds of leather + your lunch/books/notebook/iPad/umbrella/magazine/whatever.

Like I said, using it as a daily commuter bag as I travelled through several countries ranging from +30 to -30, rain, snow, sun, it's held up fine.
posted by tksh at 4:46 PM on April 10, 2012


[There is a metatalk thread already if you want to have metadiscussion about this post, etc, in case a couple of the things I just removed weren't just posted in the wrong browser window by accident.]
posted by cortex at 5:33 PM on April 10, 2012


Awesome is this where I link to Timbuk2, the best nylon bag-makers in the whole world I think. I've had one of their bags for maybe like a decade or something and it's still waterproof and structurally sound. They are pretty much invincible, and no animal has to die to make nylon. They are affordable too. Timbuk2's new funky quick-release shoulder strap whatever thing is fucking clever as hell. Their messenger bags get made right here in the USA.

A good bag is mission critical. Really, my body is just a tool that carries around my brain and my bag, and the stuff in the bag is what's actually helpful. A tough bag like any of these is worth any price because no amount of money can buy a trip back in time to prevent water damage or bag ripping + gravity etc.
posted by fuq at 5:49 PM on April 10, 2012


Their bags are indeed excellent. I have yet to travel with my duffle bag and not receive multiple compliments from fellow travellers and airport staff. My favorite is the people who say, "Wow. They don't make them like that anymore," and then I get to say, "Actually, they do..."

In fact, I have too many of their bags and have a couple I keep meaning to put on Craigslist (Duffle and Classic Briefcase). If you're in Toronto and looking to buy, memail me.


Heh...
posted by 2N2222 at 5:50 PM on April 10, 2012


"Pigskin is the second strongest hide in the world, second to kangaroo."


Just want to chime in that neither has a chance against walrus hides. That shit is nearly an inch thick. Eskimos make ocean-going boats from them.
posted by spitbull at 6:01 PM on April 10, 2012


Didn't one of their bags get blown up with C4 on Mythbusters? On their bomb-plot-to-kill-Hitler episode, or something.

Sorry, this adds no substance to the conversation - my brain just vomited up this fact at me for no reason.

Um... nice bags, but I could never justify spending so much on a bag with a logo made out of Papyrus embossed into the leather.
posted by zennish at 6:49 PM on April 10, 2012


And the joke he closes with about locking your wife and your dog in the trunk of your car? Yeah, that's not funny either and totally destroys any goodwill created by the story of him and his dog.
posted by jbickers at 12:14 PM on April 10


It made me think of Diane Lockward's "The Missing Wife":
Time passed. They came and went as they pleased,
chased sticks when they felt like chasing sticks,
dug holes in what they came to regard
as their own backyard. They unlearned
how to roll over and play dead.
posted by joannemerriam at 6:50 PM on April 10, 2012 [2 favorites]


fuq: I always hear people going on about the Timbuk2 and it's awesome that they are recycled and reliable everything, but man are they ugly, characterless, classless bags.
posted by tumid dahlia at 6:57 PM on April 10, 2012 [1 favorite]


Just want to chime in that neither has a chance against walrus hides.

"Why are you murdering that walrus?"

"IS STRONG SKIN! GOOD FOR WALLET!"
posted by tumid dahlia at 6:59 PM on April 10, 2012 [1 favorite]


My drool-inducing, lottery-win briefcase is the Dunhill Tradition. It costs about $5,000. I admire it at the shop in New York. My practical, travel-across-Africa bag is Filson's Oil Finish Field Bag, at $135.
posted by cribcage at 7:26 PM on April 10, 2012


Many but not all of the Timbuk2 bags are made in SF. I believe the item page will say if it is.
I like Rickshaw Bags. They are made in SF too and let you customize a lot of things - the exterior color, the inside, the binding and the label. The tweed fabric is my favorite.
posted by oneear at 7:39 PM on April 10, 2012 [1 favorite]


(Also, really, "your kids will fight over it when you're dead"? There's not a thing in the world that would lead me to be so gauche as to fight over it after my parents' deaths. It's on beyond trashy to quarrel over the possessions of the dead, and I confidently expect to be prostrate with grief. Should I have children and nice leathergoods, I would not want to leave anything to them in a way that would promote bad feeling.

I address this in my own life by imagining strangers fighting at my estate sale.
posted by pullayup at 8:46 PM on April 10, 2012


I always hear people going on about the Timbuk2 and it's awesome that they are recycled and reliable everything, but man are they ugly, characterless, classless bags.

Different folks, different strokes. I'd never in a million years want to be seen in public with one of the cheesy leather bags in this FPP, but I love all the different messenger bags (including Timbuk2); if I had more money and more storage space I'd totally collect messenger bags from all the artisanal shops and hang them as art.
posted by Forktine at 9:15 PM on April 10, 2012


2N2222: Wait, what?
posted by RolandOfEld at 10:19 PM on April 10, 2012


Oh and I have a timbuk2 bag that I use for bike trips, they are good bags and well built for the task at hand.
posted by RolandOfEld at 10:20 PM on April 10, 2012


I don't know about the leather goods but I liked the look of his FJ55 Land Cruiser. I had two of those, and if not for the fact that the bodies were made of steel that started rusting the moment a cloud appeared in the sky and then never stopped rusting I'd still have one. The South West is a better place for an FJ55 than Seattle.
posted by Mei's lost sandal at 10:40 PM on April 10, 2012


Really, in this day and age, you would be willing to go back to suitcases that don't have wheels?

Dude, you'll pry my Globetrotters from my cold, dead hands.
posted by PeterMcDermott at 10:53 PM on April 10, 2012


Was just about to order a nice wallet - $42 is a damn good price for a quality leather wallet - but they must be extremely heavy and in a very big box because apparently it will cost USPS $32.84 to ship it to Australia.

Email them. Seriously. There's a note on the site somewhere that says these prices are for the big shit, and the little stuff costs a lot less but you need to email them to sort it out.

It might have cost me $20 to have them send two wallets to the UK.
posted by PeterMcDermott at 11:02 PM on April 10, 2012


Christian? Well I certainly won't buy from him!
posted by smackfu


I don't mind purchasing goods and services from people of religious backgrounds. If I did, I'd hardly be able to purchase a lot of the things I enjoy.

Being religious is not the same as inserting religious tracts into a transaction in which they have no place, and the consumer is unaware of their inclusion. That's taking advantage of your customer to grind an ax, and that is what I won't support.
posted by lazaruslong at 6:25 AM on April 11, 2012


Just want to chime in that neither has a chance against walrus hides. That shit is nearly an inch thick. Eskimos make ocean-going boats from them.

You could probably make a decent kayak from a sheet of paper an inch thick. The point is that you can skive down the leather from a pig to little more than a membrane and it will still be too tought to tear. This makes it perfect for linings and such.

Which, to me, suggests the question "Why don't they use stainless steel to make the rivets?"
Anyone know? Does stainless steel and leather not play well together?


Funny enough, stainless steel stains leather. I don't know what the process behind it is, but as soon as tanned leather touches steel, the steel will darken the leather. This is effect is used when stamping leather.
posted by Sourisnoire at 6:34 AM on April 11, 2012 [1 favorite]


I have one of their wallets, and it's nice.

Unfortunately, their old logo is set in Papyrus. That font will be around forever, and also in my pocket.
posted by helicomatic at 6:52 AM on April 11, 2012 [1 favorite]


Yet another instance of "This hasn't been on the blue already?"

I have one of their Classic Briefcases, and I love it. It's a great bag for a MacBook and I get a ton of compliments about it. It is heavy though—eight pounds empty—and I've found that converting it to backpack mode makes it easier to carry, even though I still carry it on one shoulder. I recommend haunting Daves Deals if you're on the fence about the price.

I also did not get any bible stuff, just a few business cards.
posted by ChurchHatesTucker at 8:44 AM on April 11, 2012


Or at least, of the things I buy, a handful will be timeless accessories that I'll use forever and most will get sold on or given away.

I think this is pretty much in line with what all those BIFL people are doing, as well. You're not the only one buying "timeless accessories" for the "right reason." This is pretty much the advice given by devymetal in this AskMe, and I don't think any of it warranted any tut-tutting about how people are fooling themselves about buying long-lasting classic items for one's own purposes.

(also: men have a huge advantage here-- I don't have a pair of Alden shoes, but my friend does have a few pairs of Allen Edmonds, and cap-toe Oxford shoes will always go with a suit. And nice shoes are better than cheap shoes to begin with)

Yeah, I rag on Saddleback, but the guy with the Saddleback briefcase is doing better for himself that the person with a closet full of half-assed briefcases acquired as conference-swag, sale-purchases inspired by the thought that, "I might have a use for this!", and gifts that they don't use. I have a hard time throwing things out, and I can't stand having junk around. Back in 1998, I bought a Maglite flashlight which I still have and use. I walk into some people's garages and see that they have 4 or 5 cheap flashlights they picked up because they needed one, and most of them no longer work, but they don't want to throw them out. I think I came out ahead. I hate being surrounded by junk that people pick up because "it was a good deal."
posted by deanc at 8:57 AM on April 11, 2012 [1 favorite]


there is some weird cultural stuff floating around the idea of Buying It For Life or all the Shop Class as Soulcraft

See the Sam Vimes Theory of Economic Injustice.
posted by ChurchHatesTucker at 9:13 AM on April 11, 2012


I hate being surrounded by junk that people pick up because "it was a good deal."

Can we be best friends? I think we'd get along...
posted by RolandOfEld at 9:13 AM on April 11, 2012


(also: men have a huge advantage here-- I don't have a pair of Alden shoes, but my friend does have a few pairs of Allen Edmonds, and cap-toe Oxford shoes will always go with a suit. And nice shoes are better than cheap shoes to begin with)

I have to out myself here: I'm not a man. I just wear men's shoes ("but are they men's shoes if I'm wearing them?") If you wear a women's eight or above, you can generally buy shoes from the high-end men's makers, although you have to look a little harder as you're looking for men's 6s and 7s. You can even track down 4s and 5s if you're able to pay a ton.

Since I have huge feet, I take a men's 8/8.5. I don't think I've bought women's shoes once in the past four years - the quality isn't there and it's endlessly annoying to have to deal with the cheap leather and bad finish and stiff thread, etc etc, plus it's hard to find durable flats with arch support that aren't mind-bendingly hideous.

If you're fortunate enough to be able to wear men's sizes, I recommend men's loafers (many styles looks virtually identical to womens') and keeping an eye out for the daintier kinds of men's brogues and captoes. A highly ornamented brogue like the Allen Edmonds Broadstreet works just fine with women's office clothes. You need to eBay stalk gently used or deadstock versions, though, unless you're in a position to pay full retail. Also, saddle shoes - suede saddle shoes for spring and summer are perfectly acceptable on women.

Now, I wear full-on clompy brogues and bluchers, but that's because I'm as queer as a three dollar bill and couldn't conceal that fact even if I applied the whole of the Cover Girl wall at Target plus a perm, so there's no point in dialing back the shoes.
posted by Frowner at 9:27 AM on April 11, 2012 [2 favorites]


the young rope-rider: "I guess no one here ever put a male spouse in their trunk for an hour just to see if he still loved you. Typical metafilter"

My wife may or may not have left me in a Kansas jail longer than she had to, but I was too glad to see her to ask any questions.
posted by notsnot at 9:31 AM on April 11, 2012 [2 favorites]



I'm amused how quickly man bags went from a joke on shows like Friends and Seinfeld during the 90s, to a de rigueur accessory just a few years later a la Jack Bauer.


If you are working, you can carry a bag. If you are carrying one just for the fashion of it, it is still considered a little weird.
posted by gjc at 5:28 PM on April 11, 2012


Is this where I mention my 12 year old Timbuk2 bag which I bought back when they offered waxed cotton bags? It's flown across the country several times in both directions, hiked through deserts and forests full of art gear, perched on my back on my motorcycle with a 12 pack of Yuengling beer in cans, a half gallon of milk, and a loaf of uncrushed bread inside. And it's currently sitting on my kitchen floor, looking wonderfully mellowed and aged with my grandfather's and great uncle's WWII regimental patches and a score of roller derby buttons on the outside flap and a sleeping cat inside.

The first gift I got my wife when we were dating was a Timbuk2 bag. Hers now has more roller derby buttons than mine, but I like to think that gift let her know I was planning on being around for the long haul.

Also: this is as good a time as any to mention I never wrote them that letter.
posted by 1f2frfbf at 6:11 PM on April 11, 2012 [1 favorite]


They still making those waxed canvas bags? I'm getting conflicting info via google.

being around for the long haul.

Pun intended?
posted by RolandOfEld at 8:55 AM on April 12, 2012


They still making those waxed canvas bags? I'm getting conflicting info via google.

I don't think so. I see some every so often as a special thing, but sadly they don't produce on demand the one I bought anymore, which is a shame, as I absolutely adore mine. The olive green and purple panels have aged wonderfully.

being around for the long haul.

Pun intended?


Considering I drug her ass all around to my favorite places in New Orleans for a honeymoon a few weeks ago, there may not be any pun at all...
posted by 1f2frfbf at 12:02 PM on April 12, 2012


These remind me a bit of the Cambridge Satchel Company, which I may well order a bag from when my current one (green leather tooled satchel, £20 from Asos.com, showered with complements from strangers) wears out. Both in the old-school aesthetic and the wider cultural meaning that other posters have brought up - the idea of heritage and buying for life and all that stuff.

Frowner - I'm, i think, a US11 (we don't have separate sizes for men and women here) and I've had to wear men's trainers since I was about fourteen, as i'm a US12 in those. I have a pair of brogues i like to wear with dresses, but being women's 'fashion' shoes, they aren't leather and aren't great for walking long distances in. I haven't seen any similar men's brogues that aren't either too 'manly' for me, or are the weird shiny things that wannabe estate agents wear.
posted by mippy at 1:15 PM on April 12, 2012


I'm amused how quickly man bags went from a joke on shows like Friends and Seinfeld during the 90s, to a de rigueur accessory just a few years later a la Jack Bauer.

If you are working, you can carry a bag. If you are carrying one just for the fashion of it, it is still considered a little weird.
posted by gjc


I also think some of this is a city thing - I never carried a bag of any sort until I moved back to NYC and it became obvious immediately that it was a necessity. Luckily, my newfound job sold Timbuk2 bags... and as ugly as it is, I've still got that bag - over 15 years later.
posted by blaneyphoto at 8:49 PM on April 12, 2012


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