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August 4, 2012 4:39 PM   Subscribe

Rachel's Gift. A follow up one year later. A refresher in hope, generosity and love for others.
posted by Mojojojo (22 comments total) 14 users marked this as a favorite

 
This little girl even made water come out of my eyes.
posted by kamikazegopher at 4:52 PM on August 4, 2012 [12 favorites]


So sorry she left this earth too soon.
posted by ThePinkSuperhero at 4:57 PM on August 4, 2012


I vote this for August's best post. (Is that how it's done?)
posted by growabrain at 5:12 PM on August 4, 2012 [1 favorite]


That little girl's selflessness humbles me.
posted by These Birds of a Feather at 5:17 PM on August 4, 2012


Sniff
posted by k8t at 5:35 PM on August 4, 2012


This is what I like to refer to as an ultimate good.
posted by allkindsoftime at 5:50 PM on August 4, 2012


What an amazing little girl.

As the dust in this room settles, though, I start wondering about what it implies that it took the death of a white child to inspire sympathy for million of black ones.
posted by cmoj at 5:58 PM on August 4, 2012 [7 favorites]


Or maybe it took her selflessness to inspire the same in others. I hope that's closer.
posted by cmoj at 5:58 PM on August 4, 2012 [4 favorites]


In that day the wolf and the lamb will live together; the leopard will lie down with the baby goat. The calf and the yearling will be safe with the lion, and a little child will lead them all.

I began following Rachel's Wish a year ago. Rachel's story is heart rending even if she wasn't so amazing in her selflessness. What really tore me were the comments and donations from around the WORLD. A year later, people and corporations continue to donate in Rachel's name.
posted by Mojojojo at 6:15 PM on August 4, 2012 [1 favorite]


Wow, talk about making the best out of a heartbreaking situation.
posted by roger ackroyd at 6:35 PM on August 4, 2012


As the dust in this room settles, though, I start wondering about what it implies that it took the death of a white child to inspire sympathy for million of black ones.

I don't think race has anything to do with it, and making it a race issue, IMHO, devalues the situation.
posted by Malice at 6:48 PM on August 4, 2012 [6 favorites]


This is truly a great gift to give. I was listening to Jason Noble's band Rachel's at the exact time I was reading this, the song was called "Water From the Same Source."
posted by occidental at 6:49 PM on August 4, 2012


I don't think race has anything to do with it, and making it a race issue, IMHO, devalues the situation.

Your'e right, I don't necessarily think it's a race issue either. At least not at this level. I don't know that it's not, though.

I don't know what the issue is. People see this tragic story about this little girl who was a part of this priveliged culture or race or social class or something and that's what triggers them to care about children of a completely different culture/race/social class/something?

I mean this girl seems to have been a naturally amazing person, and it's incredibly awesome that what came of her tragedy is what it is. But why is that what triggered people into giving? What does it mean that that's what did it?

I don't know. I honestly can't wrap my head around it.
posted by cmoj at 10:21 PM on August 4, 2012 [1 favorite]


Sweet Child, didn't die for nothing.

Her mother knelt and drank from the well.
posted by mule98J at 10:58 PM on August 4, 2012


This is what being good is all about. People don't notice you when you're alive nearly as much as they notice you when you've been taken away too early. Usually when a young child dies in a horrific way all we can feel is horrified. There's no justice, no greater good, just a dead kid. Because Rachel lived in a kind, compassionate way and did what little she could to make her world better we all benefit. We get that small little hint of light in the darkness. That idea that, yes, life is terrible but there's still good in it.

Thank you Rachel.

.
posted by M Edward at 11:16 PM on August 4, 2012 [1 favorite]


I don't know what the issue is. People see this tragic story about this little girl who was a part of this priveliged culture or race or social class or something and that's what triggers them to care about children of a completely different culture/race/social class/something?

For the little girl, she was probably just seeing it as helping someone, and isn't that what matters anyway? Also, does it really matter why someone gives, as long as they give, and does it matter what another person thinks about the person who's giving?

I mean this girl seems to have been a naturally amazing person, and it's incredibly awesome that what came of her tragedy is what it is. But why is that what triggered people into giving? What does it mean that that's what did it?

I think it's just that the tragedy is what's making people notice the situation. And if it brings more notice to the situation, is that a bad thing? It's not like no one is ever giving except this one girl. Lots of people do, they just don't get recognition for it.

And as far as her being part of the privileged social class, a few things on that:

1.) The poor can't afford to give to the poor.
2.) When the poor can afford to give, some of them do.
3.) I am sure the people with clean, fresh water really don't give a crap about the semantics.
posted by Malice at 11:27 PM on August 4, 2012 [3 favorites]


At the age of nine, there's nothing so very unusual in compassion and a belief that the world should be more equitable. What is it that beats this essential kindness out of so many people as they grow up? The cruelty of the world? Watching how the adults they know actually live their lives?

Maybe Rachel's abiding gift will be to keep that idealism alive a little longer in the hearts of the young folks who hear about it. 9-years-old, 10, 11, 12... if it can survive in enough 18-year-olds, it could actually change the world.
posted by Scram at 4:38 AM on August 5, 2012 [1 favorite]


Malice, you, eponysterically, seem to be interpreting what I'm saying as some kind of condemnation of all of this. I know why the little girl wanted to do what she was trying to do. Because it's the right view.

Were all of these people really taken by surprise that there are people without water in this world? Why did the death of one person who was like them and not the suffering of millions who are unlike them inspire empathy?

Or, if you prefer, I'll just wring my hands, wipe a tear from my eye, and not bother discussing why things are the way they are.
posted by cmoj at 10:42 AM on August 5, 2012


Who cares? Why this negative analysis of motivation? Why the need to sully the motivation?
posted by Snyder at 10:48 AM on August 5, 2012


not bother discussing why things are the way they are.

What good is it doing here? She has helped inspire people to donate. That's what matters. If you want to do some real good, donate and don't ask why someone is doing it.
posted by Malice at 11:05 AM on August 5, 2012


Got it. Thinking bad.
posted by cmoj at 11:45 AM on August 5, 2012


Got it. Thinking bad.
posted by cmoj at 11:45 AM on August 5 [+] [!]


Don't do this, it's needlessly mean-spirited.

I think the answer you are looking for is as simple as this:

Sometimes, people in a position of relative privilege need to be reminded by others within their ranks that not everyone has the same standard of living.
posted by tantrumthecat at 3:51 PM on August 5, 2012 [1 favorite]


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