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And Now For Something....
December 15, 2012 2:10 PM   Subscribe

(minor Spoilers should be assumed for most of the post) Fringe, which many have called a cult show, has a pension for playfully populating its episodes with pop culture references and has continued to do so into its fifth and final season.

As mentioned previously, the show has gone as far as to release a record by a fictional prog-rock group, regularly tinker with its own opening titles, and lay aside each season's 19th episode in order to play with the show's format. There has been a musical episode, an animated episode, and an episode that takes place in the show's future and includes opening titles similar to the opening of the film, Blade Runner.

The show's most recent season is a shorter one, scheduled to last only 13 episodes, and thusly it will not have the traditional 19th episode. That hasn't stopped the show from having a similar amount of fun with this season's ninth episode which includes an homage to Terry Gilliam's technique of cut out animation.

While it may be a stretch it is also worth mentioning that the legendary Monty Python comedy group, including Gilliam, were influenced by a comedy stage show called "Beyond the Fringe" which was created via a collaboration between the Oxford Revue and The Cambridge Footlights (previously). This is all somewhat relevant because not only were some of Python's members involved with organizations like the Revue but Oxford is also where Fringe's resident, loveably mad doctor, Walter Bishop, did his Post-Graduate work.
posted by sendai sleep master (75 comments total) 26 users marked this as a favorite

 
Pension?
posted by brokkr at 2:16 PM on December 15, 2012


Annoying pedantic nitpick: Penchant not Pension.

I like this show but stopped watching it due to my new policy of not trusting any american television series to be coherent or actually resolve plotlines before cancelation. When it is done I may get the box set and give a run through if the reviews are still favourable.

Is the shorter season a sign of pending cancellation?
posted by srboisvert at 2:18 PM on December 15, 2012 [3 favorites]


It is unusually planned, so they are able to hopefully wrap things up in the last 15th episodes. The actors talk in detail about this on a few Comic Con type interviews - worth seeking out for reassurance.
posted by Augenblick at 2:23 PM on December 15, 2012


This season is their last, which they knew going in.
posted by rtha at 2:23 PM on December 15, 2012


Is the shorter season a sign of pending cancellation?

Guaranteed cancellation. They went in knowing that was the deal.

For my money this season has been an improvement over last season, which was a trainwreck caused by a too-clever idea poorly execution. I can't think of another show that has completely changed its premise so regularly -- this year's setup is at least Fringe 4.0, and the show is almost barely recognizable as the X-Files ripoff it started as.
posted by gerryblog at 2:24 PM on December 15, 2012 [1 favorite]


Is the shorter season a sign of pending cancellation?

Yes, this is the last season. It's weird as hell, too. I've seen every episode of the show and I'm not sure I have any idea what is going on. It took a very, very weird turn.
posted by something something at 2:24 PM on December 15, 2012 [5 favorites]


My husband and I just started watching it recently and we're at the beginning of season four. Bookmarked this post to come back to once we're caught up and I don't need to worry about spoilers. Thanks!
posted by skycrashesdown at 2:32 PM on December 15, 2012


Im using LSD to mentally summon shakesperian to this thread.
posted by The Whelk at 2:39 PM on December 15, 2012 [2 favorites]


I think that they are really pushing the limits of the show this season. It's recognizeably the same show in terms of the themes it is exploring, but -- as in past seasons -- it is exploring those themes by shuffling and re-arranging all of its visuals and characters. The effect is certainly disorienting: at times this season it has felt, to me, like an entirely different show doing an homage to Fringe.

I don't like how Olivia has been pushed to the background this season, and will be very disappointed if she doesn't have some kind of a resurgence in the few remaining episodes. (I'm only caught up though Five-Twenty-Ten.)
posted by gauche at 2:41 PM on December 15, 2012 [4 favorites]


I was actually already here, but in time pocket where you couldn't see me.
posted by shakespeherian at 2:41 PM on December 15, 2012 [23 favorites]


My problem was, having watched the pre-MST3K bad movie showcase "Fright Night" in my teens, I heard original host "Sinister" Seymour repeatedly address the audience as "Fringies", so I have resisted the urge to follow this show for fear that I would revert to "Fringie" status.
posted by oneswellfoop at 2:56 PM on December 15, 2012


I don't want to spoil it, but last night's episode, titled "Black Blotter" really did feature a character tripping throughout. Probably the best tv show epidose featuring someone taking acid, ever. Fringe has a very pro-drug protagonist. It's probably Walter's second hit, too.

There's a lot more to this last episode than just the Gilliam tribute, and thankfully the linked clip above doesn't show just how his answer saves the day -- or how it's foreshadowed throughout.
posted by Catblack at 3:14 PM on December 15, 2012 [1 favorite]


Fringe has gone from an X-Files clone to a deeply emotional and affecting television show about the consequences of our actions, and how we--knowingly or not--create our own destinies through those actions.

However, unlike most shows of its ilk, all those monster of the week episodes from the first couple of seasons actually have continued resonance and meaning even unto the end of the show (thus far). Picture the pilot as a guitar string that has just been plucked and is vibrating, slowly to return to a state of rest. Said string's range of motion gives us all the trials, plot twists, timelines, universes and travails of the show. The finale will show the string at rest again, in a new, different form. This is what Lost should have been.

I still miss geeky Lincoln Lee however. And the even hotter Blincoln E. Lee (the "E" is for "something I made up"). And Redstrid. Also, the last act of this week's show--so wonderfully scored!--had my eyes welling.

On preview, catblack it's 4 hits by my count. At least.
posted by PapaLobo at 3:17 PM on December 15, 2012 [8 favorites]


Fringe is an amazing show that has managed to re-invent itself in so many occasions in which ways never seen before....the current season is such a reboot and man at times it has been amazing. I have to say I miss some the alternate dimension characters....but I can't imagine of another show that has managed to give us so many different storylines (or timelines) in such a short amount of time.

By the way, for those not familiar, everyone came into this season expecting it to be the last one and has been written as such....which is good to know. Also, Episode 9 had some very weird, quirky scenes which i thoroughly enjoyed!
posted by The1andonly at 3:22 PM on December 15, 2012


Pension?

My mistake, I was on semi-automatic pilot there, my apologies for anyone to whom this was nails on a chalk board.

I can't think of another show that has completely changed its premise so regularly -- this year's setup is at least Fringe 4.0,

One of my favorite things about the show, on a broad level, is that it seems to interact with its fandom on an almost textual level. Are you shipping Oliva and Lincoln instead of Olivia and Peter? There's a universe for that! Dismayed that the first season set-up William Bell, Nina, and Broyles to be villains and/or foils but went in another direction? Wish they were actually villains? There's both a timeline AND a universe for that! This, I think, is interesting on a level other than just fan wish fulfillment. It allows for a variety of ways to interpret and enjoy the show while highlighting what makes certain permanent elements so important.

Take Oliva, for example. She's almost always the show's hero and most of the time it absolutely works. She's the hero in the first season while she searches for the truth and attempts to literally get her ex out of her brain. She's the hero in season two while attempts to find out the truth behind the other universe and herself as part of the cortexiphan trials. She's the hero in season three as multiple versions of herself. In all of these versions (whether she's stoic or wise-cracking, single or in a relationship, a mother or not) Olivia is the show's moral compass in a vaguely utilitarian way. She's interested in saving the world (in comparison to both Bishops who are interested in saving their OWN world, however you might wish to define that) and she's interested in asserting herself.

Just about every season has Oliva A. saving the world and B. doing so while not letting others have agency over who she is. The ex-boyfriend does not get to stay in her head she. She does not let the alternate world chemically turn her into the other Olivia and she does not let Peter off the hook for falling for the other Olivia. Heck, even in the fourth season where I agree with those that say Olivia (and much of the show) hit a bit of a slump, there's a whole episode where Olivia, consciously and of her own volition, decides to subsume the memory's of the Olivia from the initial time-line.

I think there's a lot of conversation to be had via this show and its characters regarding heroism, identity, gender roles, and a lot more and I think the shifting nature of the show welcomes it.


I don't like how Olivia has been pushed to the background this season, and will be very disappointed if she doesn't have some kind of a resurgence in the few remaining episodes. (I'm only caught up though Five-Twenty-Ten.)


She has been taking a bit more of the initiative lately, thank goodness.
posted by sendai sleep master at 3:26 PM on December 15, 2012 [3 favorites]


For those of you who don't know, most of the early episodes feature a "spot the observer" moment. There's also a clue for the next episode in there, which is usually a sign hinting at something that happens. Then there's the coded word in the commercial break inserts. And the green-green-green-red motif that pops up. It's well crafted for a cult audience.

But some of those episodes are just awfully hard to get through. They aren't badly made or acted, it's just the grind of the monster of the week really, really gets old.
posted by Catblack at 3:30 PM on December 15, 2012


Man, the current season has been great. However, I'm quickly growing concerned that they're introducing way too many new plot elements to be able to coherently wrap things up by the end of the season.

Also, can we make an entire series just about Walter and Astrid working in their lab? I'd watch that.
posted by schmod at 3:33 PM on December 15, 2012 [5 favorites]


About 11 seconds into Walter's Python-esque peak there's a man wearing purple in the background. Does anyone know if it's supposed to be someone in particular? My first thought, oddly enough, was "is that Muammar Gaddafi?!"
posted by sendai sleep master at 3:34 PM on December 15, 2012


OH! And did anybody else get a Battlestar Galactica vibe from the most recent episode?
posted by schmod at 3:34 PM on December 15, 2012


Fringe has gone from an X-Files clone

While the premise is similar, i'd argue it quickly surpassed X-Files, as X-Files kept dragging out the mythos and changing it seemingly at random. I gave up on X-Files when i read Carter say that the alien invasion would happen in season 26 or somewhere about. That was a big F-You to me. I also prefer how Fringe tends to move the mythos along, each season pretty much reinvents the focus of the show, without throwing out what has gone before. I'm also much happier how the characters in Fringe learn and grow, unlike on X-Files where several seasons on people are still skeptical of what they see. Olivia had a moment in a recent episode where she came across a character who framed her experiences as supernatural, but Olivia said while they happen, she puts them in her world view. It wasn't her denying these crazy things happening.

The fingers coming down for Walter had me laughing for several minutes when i was watching this on TV, just so unexpected to me.

One complaint though, was how the preview for the episode framed it all. It made it out to be like the current timeline of the show was all in their minds, and reality wasn't what was really happening. The episode was better than that, but the preview reminded me of the ones on Lost that were like "ALL your questions will be answered!!!" leading to maybe one touched on. :P
posted by usagizero at 3:42 PM on December 15, 2012 [1 favorite]


SPOILER: really not into Season 5 so far. Also WTF most cliche magical black lady ever, was her off the Matrix not available?
posted by Artw at 3:44 PM on December 15, 2012 [2 favorites]


Fringe is great. I haven't seen the last episode yet, and it's hella flawed (still don't quite understand the third timeline in season four and what the literal impact is on the characters like I guess Olivia grew up with Nina but I tend to forget whether or not that's the case and I feel like the writers do too), but it's also great serial storytelling that respects and understands its own basic premises.

I miss Gene the Cow, though.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 3:48 PM on December 15, 2012 [4 favorites]


I think the writers miss Gene as well. There's a bit of a reference to the beloved bovine in the latest episode.
posted by sendai sleep master at 3:50 PM on December 15, 2012


Yay! Or "Moo!"
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 3:51 PM on December 15, 2012 [3 favorites]


I love Fringe, but I missed last night's episode. Was watching the Magical Mystery Tour fest on PBS.
posted by Thorzdad at 3:53 PM on December 15, 2012


Disappointed by the seemingly random Observer invasion this season, even though the episodes have been pretty good.
posted by blue_beetle at 4:17 PM on December 15, 2012 [1 favorite]


While the premise is similar, i'd argue it quickly surpassed X-Files, as X-Files kept dragging out the mythos and changing it seemingly at random. I gave up on X-Files when i read Carter say that the alien invasion would happen in season 26 or somewhere about.

1. The X-Files came on at a time when the idea of a television series "mythos" was really, really new. In fact I'd say that it was The X-Files and Buffy (and maybe some aspects of the 90's Star Trek series) that created the modern idea of a television serial with a special universe and multiple over-arching story arcs, and the like. Without the X-Files and Buffy, you couldn't have Lost or Fringe or BSG or Mad Men or Breaking Bad.

2. OMG never read anything a series creator ever says in the media about their creation! Bad idea! And definitely not a good reason to stop watching a TV show. I say this with all due respect as someone who assists series creators and hopes to be one someday -- they probably know less about their creation than the average fan does. Not in terms of encyclopedic knowledge, but in terms of the way that the show has gotten bigger than just this cool idea they had in their head. For someone like Chris Carter or Matt Weiner, their show will always be just this cool idea they had in their head. Which makes their opinions irrelevant to your enjoyment of the show.
posted by Sara C. at 4:19 PM on December 15, 2012 [1 favorite]


Without the X-Files and Buffy, you couldn't have Lost or Fringe or BSG or Mad Men or Breaking Bad.
Babylon 5, daytime and 80s nighttime soap operas would all like to have a word or 4500 with you.
posted by PapaLobo at 4:21 PM on December 15, 2012 [9 favorites]


In fact I'd say that it was The X-Files and Buffy (and maybe some aspects of the 90's Star Trek series) that created the modern idea of a television serial with a special universe and multiple over-arching story arcs, and the like

Zathras is disappointed.
posted by ROU_Xenophobe at 4:24 PM on December 15, 2012 [7 favorites]


The man in the background at 0:11 in the movie appears to be inspired by a 15th-century Italian condottiero. The bridge of the nose is spot on, anyway.
posted by Earthtopus at 4:27 PM on December 15, 2012 [1 favorite]


OK! OK! Sorry guys. Twin Peaks came first. Mea culpa. Mea maxima culpa.

My point was mostly that it's unfair to criticize The X-Files when it's really just a product of its procedural time. I mean, does anybody else remember the first season of Buffy when they had to explain what a goddam slayer was at the top of every episode?
posted by Sara C. at 4:28 PM on December 15, 2012


does anybody else remember the first season of Buffy when they had to explain what a goddam slayer was at the top of every episode?
No, because the Whedonverse started with Dollhouse, the ramifications of which led to the exodus from Earth That Was into the 'verse as shown in Firefly. The Avengers might have happened somewhere in-between :-P
posted by PapaLobo at 4:31 PM on December 15, 2012


Well, that was a terrific third act.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 5:09 PM on December 15, 2012 [1 favorite]


Without the X-Files and Buffy, you couldn't have Lost or Fringe or BSG or Mad Men or Breaking Bad.
Babylon 5, daytime and 80s nighttime soap operas would all like to have a word or 4500 with you.


I agree there, Babylon 5 spoiled me for mythos on shows, doing it so well, and even Buffy moved the mythos along better than X-Files though. Millennium even did a better job with that i feel. Don't get me wrong, i do love X-Files, it's just that when people call Fringe a copy, it's really only part of the show. For shows that really broke ground for me, Neon Genesis Evangelion took the Twin Peaks thing and showed me how far out that could go. ;)

OMG never read anything a series creator ever says in the media about their creation! Bad idea! And definitely not a good reason to stop watching a TV show.

That's probably true. I didn't stop watching, but it became less of a drive to tune in and think deeply about it. This was around season seven or eight if i remember right too. A big part of my whole getting tired of it even has a trope named after it, The Chris Carter Effect. That interview just felt like the final straw to me.
posted by usagizero at 5:11 PM on December 15, 2012 [1 favorite]


Doctor Who does not belong on there. I dearly love the Doctor, especially at some of his finer moments, but a list of the best cult shows shouldn't include Doctor Who because everyone's already heard of it.

Also: Lexx is sorely missing.
posted by dunkadunc at 5:12 PM on December 15, 2012 [1 favorite]


I'm sad to see Fringe wrapping up, but am thrilled with this final season. I was annoyed at first with the "this is an entirely different show" setting, but they've been pulling in elements from the previous seasons in ways which tie this current plotline with the earlier seasons.

Also, Walter has done so much acid on this show, most of it hasn't even been depicted as a major plot point.

I thought the Gilliam animation bit from this recent episode was great, and am really hoping the final four episodes take the series places unexpected but logical and ultimately satisfying.
posted by hippybear at 5:32 PM on December 15, 2012 [2 favorites]


I've been cherry picking Vince Gilligan episodes of The X Files recently, and its been a good reminder of what made that show good - which the Mythos was only a background element of.
posted by Artw at 5:36 PM on December 15, 2012


...and of course Mr. Gilligan has gone on to bigger and better things.

Well maybe not quite like that.
posted by PapaLobo at 6:04 PM on December 15, 2012 [2 favorites]


Drive, the episode he wrote with Brian Cranston in it, is really quite excellent.
posted by Artw at 6:25 PM on December 15, 2012 [3 favorites]


If nothing else Fringe made me think maybe I could rock an ear cuff.
posted by The Whelk at 7:22 PM on December 15, 2012 [1 favorite]


*cuffs Whelk on the ear"

did that rock?
posted by hippybear at 7:27 PM on December 15, 2012 [2 favorites]


Also when Fringe tipped its hand on it's central premise, the concept of competing alternate universe, it went from okay show into a great show. I'm seriously, it sat down and took the time to explore the ramifications of there "being more than one of everything" and every time it wandered away from the Universe A Vs. Universe B stuff, it got less interesting, but even when it pressed the oh-so-clever reset button at the end of season three, it was still about it's core theme - that everything is the result of lots of random situations and if one thing was different, then everything ends up different. The universe where we can see our mistakes turned into failures, our choices gone a different way, people change or don't exist at all and our reality and personhood is really a complex web of interactions that we're barely aware of.

Heady stuff for a primetime network show! And really ..humane. You never get the superhero agent feeling, it's all group effort and by the grace of god go I. It's an amazingly empathic show, which makes sense given Olivia's prime power is empathy and not in a weak-ass Counselor Troi kinda way. Hell, it's heavily implied that her empathic powers as a result of her treatments is what makes her walled off, she's not cold cause she's a bitch she's cold cause the other option is feeling too much and getting too involved and ending up like the reserve empath, forcing everyone to feel what you're feeling all the time. And then she gets to see what her life would have been like if she wasn't basically an X-Man* and hoo boy do I fucking like that.

Seriously the Oliva/Fauxlivia dynamic is like my favorite thing in this show. It's got a lot of the good Battlestar Galatica Stuff in it and I really liked the steady implication that Fauxliliva is actually the *better* version cause she wasn't fucked around with by Walter.

Cause Walter fucking around with things is the prime mover in this show's universe. And I think without the concept of the Alternate Universe and doubles and paths not taken and mirrors, the show is ...well I'm happy they had the balls to completely change it and turn the Fringe team into Captains America in FUTURE CASABLANCA but the whole Alt. Universe thing was the heart of the show and it's greatest strength. I'm glad it gets an ending, but I want to see Redastrid again.

*Seriously by the end of Season 4, she's Jean Grey. You can seriously just plop her into a decent X-Man story and all her lines still work. And I loved that.
posted by The Whelk at 7:34 PM on December 15, 2012 [9 favorites]


that being said I have no idea how the show is going to deliver a satisfying climax and resolution without just having reality itself collapse.
posted by The Whelk at 7:40 PM on December 15, 2012


did anybody else get a Battlestar Galactica vibe

Both shows are filmed in the Vancouver area - there is something about both the light and the vegetation up here. Likely some of the crew are shared too.
posted by not_that_epiphanius at 7:44 PM on December 15, 2012


both have actors playing multiple versions of themselves with varying degrees of success.
posted by The Whelk at 7:48 PM on December 15, 2012


One of my favorite things about the show, on a broad level, is that it seems to interact with its fandom on an almost textual level. Are you shipping Oliva and Lincoln instead of Olivia and Peter? There's a universe for that! Dismayed that the first season set-up William Bell, Nina, and Broyles to be villains and/or foils but went in another direction? Wish they were actually villains? There's both a timeline AND a universe for that! This, I think, is interesting on a level other than just fan wish fulfillment. It allows for a variety of ways to interpret and enjoy the show while highlighting what makes certain permanent elements so important.

Not to get too Fanficy but I had a good even bet that one of the Alt Lincolns would be gay in some universe. Oh where, there's a puce universe for that. (no it's SALMON not puce, sheesh)
posted by The Whelk at 7:59 PM on December 15, 2012 [1 favorite]


I think I just decided that the show should end by failing to boot the observers out but evacuating to the Alternaverse.
posted by shakespeherian at 9:21 PM on December 15, 2012 [1 favorite]


Anyone else think it's going to end with Walter causing all the season 1 fringe events?
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 9:39 PM on December 15, 2012 [2 favorites]


...and The Plan turns out to be The Pattern? That would be pretty great.
posted by Uncle Ira at 10:00 PM on December 15, 2012 [2 favorites]


The very last scene should have William Bell show up, announce that he has a solution to all the problems, pull out a Tricorder and say "five to beam up", shimmers, fade to black.
posted by sammyo at 10:00 PM on December 15, 2012 [2 favorites]


they all retreat to the cartoon universe and have fun with roger rabbit.
posted by The Whelk at 10:19 PM on December 15, 2012


I secretly hope that zombie Charlie Francis who is also married to bug lady swings in via chandelier and saves the day.
posted by sendai sleep master at 10:31 PM on December 15, 2012 [1 favorite]


Dont ZFT and the red universe between themselves pretty much account for The Pattern?

Though, come to mention it, did the guy with the future-gun who was after the Observer beacon in episode 3 or 4 or so ever get accounted for?
posted by Artw at 10:35 PM on December 15, 2012


Pension?

I believe that in the entertainment industry they're called royalties.
posted by dhartung at 10:59 PM on December 15, 2012


In other news, cult chow is delicious and contains six essential nutrients. Now with mouthfeel!
posted by Nomyte at 11:01 PM on December 15, 2012


Just add Flayvour! (tm)
posted by The Whelk at 11:02 PM on December 15, 2012


Fringe is also responsible for my recent Bowie kick, which has in turn led to all kinds of weird synchronicity, like Grant Morrison declaring Super Gods to be an inspiration for his work just as I was thinking the same, and The movie I saw at the cinema tonight having Heroes as an important plot point.

Possibly I just inhabit a likely-to-be-Bowie-connected social milieu.
posted by Artw at 11:12 PM on December 15, 2012 [4 favorites]


The Man who fell to earth trailer the movie which is HEAVILY referenced in Fringe.

I wish more modern sci-fi was called " A Powerful love story, a cosmic mystery, a spectacular fantasy, a shocking mind stretching experience in sight, and space, and sex."
posted by The Whelk at 11:34 PM on December 15, 2012 [2 favorites]


Let's just all do soft 60/70s social commentary style sci-fi with David Bowie as the lead I would be totally down with that.
posted by The Whelk at 11:37 PM on December 15, 2012 [1 favorite]


acknowledging that the best 70s style soft sci-fi fantasia movie in recent memory with almost David Bowie is Velvet Goldmine cause that is totally a sci-fi movie don't lie to me.
posted by The Whelk at 11:39 PM on December 15, 2012 [5 favorites]


Spoilers: All the universes are made in Walter's Easy-Bake oven.
posted by Dr. Zira at 11:40 PM on December 15, 2012 [4 favorites]


they all retreat to the cartoon universe and have fun with roger rabbit.

Um, Jessica ?
posted by y2karl at 11:43 PM on December 15, 2012


the ending is that the whole series was Walter's LSD trip in the first episode and really it's just boring police and research work and he's sent back to St. Clarie's after a week.
posted by The Whelk at 11:43 PM on December 15, 2012 [2 favorites]


Wear the eye patch, Whelk.
posted by Dr. Zira at 11:46 PM on December 15, 2012


The Man Who Fell To Earth Reviewed As A Medley Of Bowie Songs

Boooowie's in SPAAAACE.
posted by The Whelk at 11:48 PM on December 15, 2012 [1 favorite]


acknowledging that the best 70s style soft sci-fi fantasia movie in recent memory with almost David Bowie is Velvet Goldmine yt cause that is totally a sci-fi movie don't lie to me.

It so totally is. But good luck explaining what that movie is even about to someone who hasn't seen it...I bet Walter could do it.
posted by biscotti at 5:35 AM on December 16, 2012


not_that_epiphanius: "Both shows are filmed in the Vancouver area - there is something about both the light and the vegetation up here. Likely some of the crew are shared too."

It was a little more subtle than that.

Apart from the obvious parallel of Walter's hot blonde hallucination telling him plans for world-domination, I could have sworn I heard a few BSG-esque musical riffs in the episode. I swore the morse code transmission was going to gradually morph into the cylon theme every time they played it...
posted by schmod at 7:36 AM on December 16, 2012 [2 favorites]


"Both shows are filmed in the Vancouver area - there is something about both the light and the vegetation up here. Likely some of the crew are shared too."

Also, the opera house!

Interestingly, Fringe was actually filmed in NY early on, before production moved.
posted by Pryde at 12:56 PM on December 16, 2012


Dr. Zira: "Spoilers: All the universes are made in Walter's Easy-Bake oven."

To be fair, he was just trying to follow Carl Sagan's apple pie recipe.
posted by schmod at 6:39 PM on December 16, 2012 [1 favorite]


One of my favorite things about the show, on a broad level, is that it seems to interact with its fandom on an almost textual level. Are you shipping Oliva and Lincoln instead of Olivia and Peter? There's a universe for that!

Thanks so much for reassuring me that my decision not to watch this show was the right one (for me).
posted by waxbanks at 7:43 PM on December 16, 2012


Oh for the love of Pete! They're Twizzlers not Red Vines. I pity the fool who can't tell the difference.
posted by Gungho at 5:58 AM on December 17, 2012


One sneaky pop culture reference: I ran into a marathon of this on cable this past Thanksgiving weekend, sorta half-watching on and off while I was doodling around the house, and I caught a little throwaway line where someone was telling someone like the first two officers on the scene were "Coscarelli and Scrimm". Forget the specific episode, but it was in the first season, and said scene was the site of something pretty comically horrific/gory, and I said O YES NICE ONE and now will watch every episode of this program.
posted by Ennis Tennyone at 8:49 AM on December 17, 2012 [1 favorite]


Ennis Tennyone, that's In Which We Meet Mr. Jones, apparently.
posted by vsync at 7:37 AM on December 18, 2012


Definatlt a high point.
posted by Artw at 8:12 AM on December 18, 2012



Yes, this is the last season. It's weird as hell, too. I've seen every episode of the show and I'm not sure I have any idea what is going on...

In 2069, while deprived of all pigmentation during an ongoing labor dispute, the cast members of the Blue Man Group in all its incarnations invade the past and conquer humanity.
posted by y2karl at 11:16 AM on December 18, 2012 [3 favorites]


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