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"smoke can add an element of interest to the shot."
July 3, 2013 8:01 AM   Subscribe

To get you ready for Independence Day, National Geographic has provided some useful tips for photographing fireworks, complete with a pretty gallery.
posted by quin (17 comments total) 12 users marked this as a favorite

 
My summary: Long exposure + tripod + something interesting in the scene that isn't fireworks.
posted by smackfu at 8:06 AM on July 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


I really liked this one: http://photography.nationalgeographic.com/photography/photo-tips/photographing-fireworks#/fireworks-gulf-coast_37114_600x450.jpg

That being said, making a non-cheesy photo of fireworks is nearly impossible.
posted by sp160n at 8:07 AM on July 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


My summary: Unless you have some unique perspective (standing on top of the Statue of Liberty, filming in slo-mo) leave your camera at home. Or at least don't photograph fireworks.
posted by DU at 8:14 AM on July 3, 2013 [3 favorites]


Murdoch block FTW. Also, unless you're a professional, put your iphone away, chilax and enjoy the show.
posted by jsavimbi at 8:29 AM on July 3, 2013


After six years of living four blocks from where the rivers come together in Pittsburgh, I am so sick of Fireworks. I swear we have them every weekend during the summer.
posted by octothorpe at 8:30 AM on July 3, 2013


What, your camera doesn't come with a "Fireworks" setting?

Tips on taking fireworks photos with your smart phone.
posted by filthy light thief at 8:32 AM on July 3, 2013


Also, unless you're a professional, put your iphone away, chilax and enjoy the show.

Or just shoot a couple of photos and *then* put the camera away. Nobody needs dozens of photos of fireworks, they're really not that interesting. If fact, nobody needs dozens of photos of any single subject.
posted by lawrencium at 8:34 AM on July 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


How do you take the perfect family photo without taking dozens of photos from relatively the same pose? Dad doesn't really smile that well, or when he does smile, his eyes are closed, and then your sister doesn't really like the way she's facing the camera except for that one shot where her arm looks wonky. You mean your family holiday cards aren't the product of at least 5 photos and an hour of photo editing? What are you, a magician?
posted by filthy light thief at 8:40 AM on July 3, 2013


Be sure to use the flash, so everyone around you knows what a serious photographer you are.
posted by Nelson at 8:40 AM on July 3, 2013 [2 favorites]


Be sure to use the flash, so everyone around you knows what a serious photographer you are.


Nah it's cool we're usually drunk at that point anyway
posted by Think_Long at 8:45 AM on July 3, 2013


You mean your family holiday cards aren't the product of at least 5 photos and an hour of photo editing?

Multiply the # of photos by at least 100 and you can get rid of the hour of editing. Shoot HD video, split into frames, select the best.
posted by DU at 8:54 AM on July 3, 2013


if I can photograph everything I will NEVER DIE
posted by threeants at 10:00 AM on July 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


Here are some tips from the New York Institute of Photography:posted by cribcage at 10:23 AM on July 3, 2013


I want to try this technique, just for the sheer fun of it.
posted by Greg_Ace at 10:54 AM on July 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


Just had to chime and say I couldn't agree more with that pull quote.
posted by smoke at 11:32 AM on July 4, 2013 [1 favorite]


Also, unless you're a professional, put your iphone away, chilax and enjoy the show.
...
Or just shoot a couple of photos and *then* put the camera away. Nobody needs dozens of photos of fireworks, they're really not that interesting. If fact, nobody needs dozens of photos of any single subject.

Photography is as legitimate a hobby as anything else. Striving for a result and achieving it, or even just learning from failures, is pleasurable and grows you as a person. You can hang out with your friends and watch the fireworks, or you can crouch over your camera. From the scenarios alone it is impossible to predict which of the two participants is having more fun or living a more meaningful and fulfilling existence.
posted by samworm at 2:29 PM on July 4, 2013 [2 favorites]


Photography is as legitimate a hobby as anything else.

I wasn't questioning the legitimacy of photography rather stating something i know having spent a lot of time behind a camera: less is more, better shots and greater involvement in the moment. Whilst the relatively recent proliferation of photography is fantastic, increasingly i find myself surrounded by people who are abstracted from the event. Watching the moment by proxy.

I'll never forget one of the best photos i didn't take, because there was no film in my camera; so i could sit there and watch the moment for the 30 seconds or so it went on for. It was wonderful.
posted by lawrencium at 1:52 PM on July 7, 2013


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