Join 3,432 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)


Live from Tahrir Square
July 3, 2013 11:19 AM   Subscribe

Live from Tahrir Square courtesy BitTorrent Live

With all the news about the gathering at Tahrir square, here's a live feed not provided by a news organization.

Although there are other live streams available, what is cool is that it is using a peer-to-peer live streaming technology that makes low latency HD, live feeds available to anybody. More details here.

**********​**********​**********​**********​**********​**********​**********​**********​**********​**********​*
**********​**********​**********​**********​**********​**********​**********​**********​**********​**********​*
**********​**********​**********​**********​**********​**********​**********​**********​**********​**********​*
This is a repost of an earlier deleted post by user ding-dong, someone I have never met, communicated with, or was even aware of before about fifteen minutes ago. ding-dong works for the originator of this technology; I do not.
posted by item (63 comments total) 8 users marked this as a favorite

 
Is RT not a news organisation? Isn't that a bit harsh?
posted by svenni at 11:30 AM on July 3, 2013


This is why I love living in the Future. The news isn't just a thing that happened yesterday.
posted by grubi at 11:30 AM on July 3, 2013 [2 favorites]


svenni Perhaps, my few interactions with RT via google translate led me to believe that its more like a tabloid, though state controlled than a news organization. I could be completely off on this though.

Perhaps the mods would be kind enough to fix that.
posted by ding-dong at 11:35 AM on July 3, 2013


That's what people in the streets looks like.
posted by Benny Andajetz at 11:36 AM on July 3, 2013


Perhaps the mods would be kind enough to fix that.

Yeah, that's okay with me as well.
posted by item at 11:38 AM on July 3, 2013


Is RT not a news organisation? Isn't that a bit harsh?

It's a news organization in the same way that the hypothetical bastard child of Weekly World News and the Central Commitee of the CPSU would be a news organization.
posted by Behemoth at 11:38 AM on July 3, 2013 [9 favorites]


RT is a news organization in any usual if not ideal sense of the term. Or to put it another way, if Fox News is a news organization, then RT is.

Is this software signed by any recognized party? I might spin up a VM to try it in but it'd be nice to know it's been screened.
posted by George_Spiggott at 11:43 AM on July 3, 2013 [3 favorites]


Is the BitTorrent client safe? Does it continue to use bandwidth when not watching streaming video? Does it do anything else "interesting"?
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 11:44 AM on July 3, 2013


This is an obvious fake. None of these people are shuffling about with one hand pronated at eye level.
posted by dr_dank at 11:46 AM on July 3, 2013


Hey, now they're celebrating July 4th!
posted by planetesimal at 11:47 AM on July 3, 2013


I'd say the RT is a news organization in the same way that Fox News, the Guardian, or Al Jazeera is (unabashedly showing their political leanings in their coverage of various subjects). That doesn't make them good or bad, just somewhat transparent in their perspective.

Regardless, the weekly world news could show a live stream of an event without commentary, and I wouldn't judge the source, and I'd just be happy that the feed was available.
posted by el io at 11:48 AM on July 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


Blazecock Pileon This is not quite BitTorrent, ie the protocol is a peer-to-peer based protocol but it is a whole different beast.

As far as I know you do need to be viewing the feed to upload to others, so if you stop it even thought the program might be running it will drop out of the swarm.

"Interesting"??
posted by ding-dong at 11:52 AM on July 3, 2013


I found it buggy (chrome, mac, Ireland), and it bounced me off my wi-fi several times. Uninstalling pronto.
posted by stonepharisee at 11:54 AM on July 3, 2013


George_Spiggot Not that I know of.
posted by ding-dong at 11:55 AM on July 3, 2013


RT is owned by the Kremlin and is blatantly pro-Putin. When it comes to Middle East coverage (among many, many other things), that matters.
posted by Sys Rq at 11:56 AM on July 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


It's a news organization in the same way that the hypothetical bastard child of Weekly World News and the Central Commitee of the CPSU would be a news organization.

If it only were that way. "Bat Boy leads Komsomol volunteers to exceed grain quota in Kazakhstan." "Hitler being kept alive by CIA sorcerers in Argentina."

Instead, IMO, they offer coverage which is critical of much of the Western neoliberal consensus, and I will take that where I can get it.
posted by banal evil at 12:00 PM on July 3, 2013 [3 favorites]


they offer coverage which is critical of much of the Western neoliberal consensus, and I will take that where I can get it.

Useful idiot.
posted by Sys Rq at 12:04 PM on July 3, 2013


The revolution is not only televised, it is also streamed live on the Internet.
posted by Authorized User at 12:05 PM on July 3, 2013 [4 favorites]


I don't think I will be streaming that. Don't want a black mark on my electronic permanent record.
posted by Samizdata at 12:08 PM on July 3, 2013


I don't think I will be streaming that. Don't want a black mark on my electronic permanent record.

posted by Samizdata

Eponysterical?
posted by phong3d at 12:11 PM on July 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


[ding-dong, it's narrowly okay for someone else to have re-made a post about this stuff but you really need to not use it as a proxy post to talk about your involvement with the tech for this to not feel like sort of blatantly skirting the principle that got your post deleted in the first place. We're already in "you're only not banned because of a presumption of good faith cluelessness" place after that, you pretty much need to give this thread a pass.]
posted by cortex at 12:11 PM on July 3, 2013


Metafilter seems a very Pepsi shade of blue today.
posted by jaduncan at 12:16 PM on July 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


Here's a Youtube stream of ONtv's coverage of Tahrir Square.

ONtv is an independent station launched by Egyptian liberal Naguib Sawiris.
posted by BobbyVan at 12:18 PM on July 3, 2013


Useful idiot.

I read the FT, and Economist for their news coverage as well; I enjoy reading sites which are critical of the consensus in the reporting in these publications, as I enjoy the criticism of Mr. Putin's government in the FT and the Economist. Simply because RT is Russian propaganda, doesn't mean that its reporting is devoid of value, or that someone who reads the site is a shill for the Russian government.
posted by banal evil at 12:21 PM on July 3, 2013 [3 favorites]


Tanks rolling in now, no idea how this will go, I can't even figure out who the bad guys are.
posted by Cosine at 12:23 PM on July 3, 2013


its a military coup
posted by MisantropicPainforest at 12:24 PM on July 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


these people are so upset you'd think someone had offered them free healthcare
posted by George_Spiggott at 12:37 PM on July 3, 2013 [23 favorites]


Morsy out in Egypt coup
posted by 445supermag at 12:37 PM on July 3, 2013 [2 favorites]


Military coups are always bad, but this dude was pretty Antidemocratic but he was elected but the Muslim brotherhood fixed the race but that's what the US Govt wants you to think but the people wanted him out but only some of the people but maybe more of them and probably the louder ones. Did I get it right?
posted by Potomac Avenue at 12:43 PM on July 3, 2013 [7 favorites]


I'm watching the livestream on MSNBC, and they are pretty positive and thrilled about this whole thing. It seems most Egyptians are, too.
posted by roomthreeseventeen at 12:44 PM on July 3, 2013


Morsy out in Egypt coup

Reeling around the fountain?
posted by Cosine at 12:49 PM on July 3, 2013 [5 favorites]


The bad guys are the ones who have millions of people demonstrating against them in the name of justice. This is a continuation of the 2011 revolution. I have a friend who left Houston Friday to demonstrate with his family in Cairo. He, along with many others feel like Morsi hijacked their revolution. His dissatisfaction with Morsi has been building for months.
posted by IanMorr at 12:56 PM on July 3, 2013


Cross-posted:

For me Morsi sacrificed a lot of his legitimacy when he didn't bother to listen to any other party when drafting the constitution then passed a law declaring himself and his cabinet above all judicial review.

I think if the army came out or did not, it still wasn't going to be a pluralistic democracy by the end of the Morsi term. The constitution killed that possibility, because it's essentially Shariah and very weak protections for minorities, religious minorities and women. There's a good case to say that this is the least worst option (and, to my surprise, I agree with that) - I'd hope that next time SCAF step down the civilian government might actually make an attempt at a pluralistic constitution with respect for all citizens.
posted by jaduncan at 1:00 PM on July 3, 2013


I think if the army came out or did not, it still wasn't going to be a pluralistic democracy by the end of the Morsi term.

Yes, sometimes all your options are bad. Still for "military coup" to end up as "least bad option" will take a lot of things going right over the next few weeks. If the military are smart they'll fix a date for new elections early and set up a credible constitutional convention of some kind and then actually follow through. It wouldn't be unprecedented, but I can't say I'm sanguine.
posted by yoink at 1:20 PM on July 3, 2013 [3 favorites]


By the way, on the topic of this particular thread: setting aside the somewhat dubious app this is quite a good example of the limitations of the whole "we're living in the future and who needs 'journalists' any more" idea. It's cool enough to look at a webcam of a bunch of people in a square; but when it really comes down to it, that doesn't actually tell you all that much about what's going on in Egypt and who's in the driver's seat. In the end, we need the good old fashioned journalists and their good old fashioned "reporting" to actually get a coherent context in which to understand the actions we see via the webcams.
posted by yoink at 1:24 PM on July 3, 2013 [8 favorites]


Everything I need to know about Russia Today I learned from watching their "documentary" on life inside North Korea. It's like reading Walter Duranty on life in the USSR in the 1930s.
posted by dhens at 1:35 PM on July 3, 2013 [6 favorites]


It's cool enough to look at a webcam of a bunch of people in a square; but when it really comes down to it, that doesn't actually tell you all that much about what's going on in Egypt and who's in the driver's seat. In the end, we need the good old fashioned journalists and their good old fashioned "reporting" to actually get a coherent context in which to understand the actions we see via the webcams.

I would posit that very few people on the blue disagree with this sentiment. The issue is that it's unacceptably challenging to find a news outlet reporting on this that would provide the "coherent context" in a useful way. Not to derail, but the other day CNN had a panel on discussing the question "which is more offensive? 'Cracker' or the N-word." Apparently it's still a debate when one word is so offensive they can't even say it or show it on their air. I'm guessing they're talking about how Twitter is responding to what's happening in Egypt.

When that level of discussion is one of the least obviously politically skewed options, a bare feed starts to look appealing.
posted by dry white toast at 1:41 PM on July 3, 2013 [2 favorites]


Reuters: Egypt army topples president, announces transition
posted by ishrinkmajeans at 2:02 PM on July 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


Well some guy named I_REAP_CATS on reddit says his family is from Egypt and they are happy about the Coup, so sounds like it's all good to me.
posted by Ad hominem at 2:23 PM on July 3, 2013 [3 favorites]


Al Jazeera English live blog

It includes the "Army Road Map"

The Egyptian Armed Forces just announced their roadmap. It includes the following:

-"Suspending the constitution provisionally;

-The Chief Justice of the Constitutional Court will declare early presidential elections;

-Interim period until president elected. Chief Justice will have presidential powers;

-A technocrat, capable national government will be formed;

-The committee will offer all its expertise to review the new constitution;

-The Supreme Constitutional Law will address the draft law and prepare for parliamentary elections;

-Securing and guaranteeing freedom of expression, freedom of media;

-All necessary measures will be taken to empower youth so they can take part in decision-making processes;

-The EAF appeal to the Egyptian people with all its spectrum to steer away from violence and remain peaceful. The Armed Forces warn it will stand up firmly and strictly to any act deviating from peacefulness based on its patriotic and historic responsibility."



(note that later in the blog pro-Mursi media reported to be shut down, and their staff arrested, so that point not 100%).

Also, from Robert Fisk:

Army is built from both sides of Egypt's divide -- yet now must keep them apart
posted by chapps at 2:29 PM on July 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


Makes me think of England after the Civil War - a mess of religion, politics, the army, military rule...
posted by alasdair at 2:46 PM on July 3, 2013


BitTorrent aside the feed is pretty choppy for me.
posted by dhartung at 3:01 PM on July 3, 2013


What is the rationale for the coup? Was Morsi somehow behaving unconstitutionally?
posted by KokuRyu at 3:13 PM on July 3, 2013


He wasn't acting unconstitutionally. The Muslim brotherhood was trying to force through theocratic changes to the constitution/laws and were pretty much incompetent in making sure civil services ran efficiently. The secular religious divide is very stark with pretty much no middle ground.
posted by ishrinkmajeans at 3:19 PM on July 3, 2013


What is the rationale for the coup? Was Morsi somehow behaving unconstitutionally?

There are a variety of answers to your questions. For instance, you might check out Marwan Bishara, the senior political analyst at Al Jazeera (published on 2 July 2013).
posted by Mister Bijou at 3:28 PM on July 3, 2013


The secular religious divide is very stark with pretty much no middle ground.

I really wonder if it is as cut and dried as all that. Someone upthread mentioned that events like this point out the need for "traditional" reporters and journalists, but after reading the misinformation that the West regularly writes about Japan, and I'm not at all convinced this is the case.

What does it mean to have a "stark divide" with "no middle ground"? Is really half the country secular, and the other half theocratic?

I will read the Marwan Bishara piece. While I've learned that all journalists, pundits and commentators are writing from one point of view, at the very least the people who actually speak the language (as opposed to foreign journos airdropped in) are worth paying attention to.
posted by KokuRyu at 3:45 PM on July 3, 2013


phong3d: "I don't think I will be streaming that. Don't want a black mark on my electronic permanent record.

posted by Samizdata

Eponysterical?
"

Woot! Finally! I didn't intend it, but it only took me 10+ years to get my first eponysterical post!
posted by Samizdata at 4:49 PM on July 3, 2013 [1 favorite]


15 Photos From the Tahrir Square Protests You’ll Never See In Legacy Media.
posted by KokuRyu at 5:11 PM on July 3, 2013


By the way, on the topic of this particular thread: setting aside the somewhat dubious app this is quite a good example of the limitations of the whole "we're living in the future and who needs 'journalists' any more" idea. It's cool enough to look at a webcam of a bunch of people in a square; but when it really comes down to it, that doesn't actually tell you all that much about what's going on in Egypt and who's in the driver's seat. In the end, we need the good old fashioned journalists and their good old fashioned "reporting" to actually get a coherent context in which to understand the actions we see via the webcams.

Nah, Twitter has that covered.
posted by Drinky Die at 5:34 PM on July 3, 2013


Am I skipping over a post about this or is it simply not getting a lot of discussion?
posted by snofoam at 6:01 PM on July 3, 2013


According to CBC radio news, Morsi has been detained, and 300 members of the Muslim Brotherhood are being hunted down.
posted by KokuRyu at 6:02 PM on July 3, 2013


Am I skipping over a post about this or is it simply not getting a lot of discussion?

Big American holiday tomorrow, and kind of a story people already followed during the first revolution. Sort of feels like a rerun.
posted by Drinky Die at 6:35 PM on July 3, 2013


Because it doesn't focus around one American person or a few of them, a la Paula Deen, Zimmerman and Martin, and Edward Snowden? Or it doesn't involve issues that everyone thinks they know something about? It's a complicated situation and has been poorly covered, at least in the U.S., pathetically covered really.
posted by raysmj at 6:46 PM on July 3, 2013 [2 favorites]


When I first heard Morsi was no longer president and the constitution was "suspended," my heart sank a bit. It seems like the military is going overboard shutting down Al Jazeera and other news outlets. Morsi was able to stand up against the military and the old establishment. With him gone, who will be able to? Maybe the military will relinquish power more easily this time.
posted by Golden Eternity at 7:47 PM on July 3, 2013


FP - Exclusive: Egyptian Ambassador to U.S.: Morsy Ouster 'Not a Coup' but 'a Popular Uprising'
posted by Golden Eternity at 8:00 PM on July 3, 2013


Obama’s Statement on Egypt

The United States is monitoring the very fluid situation in Egypt, and we believe that ultimately the future of Egypt can only be determined by the Egyptian people. Nevertheless, we are deeply concerned by the decision of the Egyptian Armed Forces to remove President Morsy and suspend the Egyptian constitution.
posted by KokuRyu at 8:10 PM on July 3, 2013


@jfdulac: Egypt's Al-Tahrir newspaper has a front-page message (in English) for President Obama today. Via @Newseum. http://t.co/3BzYgVQyKZ
posted by These Premises Are Alarmed at 4:32 AM on July 4, 2013 [1 favorite]


That's quite the headline

On CBC radio today interview with a Dr Jones from university of Ottawa saying that if US called it a coup their aid to Egyptian military would have to end.
posted by chapps at 7:51 AM on July 4, 2013 [1 favorite]


It's a complicated situation and has been poorly covered, at least in the U.S., pathetically covered really.

There are ways around this: Al Jazeera English live stream.
posted by seemoreglass at 8:31 AM on July 4, 2013


I've been following #EgyptianRevolutionNotMilitaryCoup
posted by Golden Eternity at 10:04 AM on July 4, 2013


INSIGHT - Downfall of Egypt's Brotherhood game-changer in Middle East
Analyst Sofian Bin Farhat said: "This is the fall of political Islam in Arab Spring countries after a catastrophic failure."
posted by Golden Eternity at 11:11 AM on July 4, 2013


Pro-Morsi protestors marching from Nasr City to Tahrir Square, where the anti-Morsi protestors are. This could get interesting.
posted by seemoreglass at 9:33 AM on July 5, 2013


Special Report: Mursi's downfall
(Reuters) - For Egypt's military chiefs, the final spur to rebellion came on June 26. That day top generals met Mohamed Mursi, the country's first democratically elected president, and spoke bluntly, telling the Islamist leader what he should say in a major speech he planned as protests against him intensified around the country.

"We told him it has to be short, respond to opposition demands to form a coalition government, amend the constitution and set a timeframe for the two actions," an officer present in the room told Reuters. "Yet he came out with a very long speech that said nothing. That is when we knew he had no intention of fixing the situation, and we had to prepare for Plan B."

The officer added: "We had prepared for all scenarios, from street violence to mass clashes, and had troops ready to handle both situations."
posted by Golden Eternity at 11:33 AM on July 5, 2013


« Older Madiha Tahir, a journalist and PhD candidate, pres...  |  Reports abound that Douglas En... Newer »


This thread has been archived and is closed to new comments