you make me wanna get up and SCREAM
November 4, 2013 8:08 PM   Subscribe

Newly unearthed footage of the Jimi Hendrix Experience performing Foxy Lady at the 1968 Miami Pop Festival is totally effing awesome.
posted by flapjax at midnite (30 comments total) 20 users marked this as a favorite

 
And no, I have no idea why they spell it "foxey".
posted by flapjax at midnite at 8:08 PM on November 4, 2013 [1 favorite]


So good. I love Hendrix.
posted by The World Famous at 8:22 PM on November 4, 2013


That's how it's spelled on Are You Experienced Isn't it?
posted by wabbittwax at 8:23 PM on November 4, 2013 [3 favorites]


I'm from Toronto and I've seen more animated audiences.
Good recording though.
posted by not_that_epiphanius at 8:23 PM on November 4, 2013 [5 favorites]


That's how it's spelled on Are You Experienced Isn't it?

Nope.
posted by axiom at 8:24 PM on November 4, 2013


People who live where live aren't allowed to watch this video. =(
posted by rmmcclay at 8:27 PM on November 4, 2013


For those who suffer from Wikipediaphobia:

The United States version of Are You Experienced (also released in Canada) listed the song with a spelling mistake as "Foxey Lady" and this is how it is still known among many North American fans and critics today.

Who knew?
posted by not_that_epiphanius at 8:27 PM on November 4, 2013 [1 favorite]


I watched the "Hear My Train a Coming" doc on the weekend and it's pretty good. Not a lot of surprises in there but the Miami Pop footage looks and sounds amazing. I was also struck by a set of photographs of Jimi taken Sep 17, 1970 (his last day on Earth, for those not in the know). Shivers.
posted by wabbittwax at 8:28 PM on November 4, 2013


It's "Foxy" on the original 1967 UK mono pressings of the album -- at least from the digital scans I have of the cover, the one with the band bios, but "Foxey" on the US versions.
posted by Catblack at 9:08 PM on November 4, 2013


I hope someone makes the raw footage available. I want to hear and see Hendrix...not audience shots, still photos, etc. Don't care much for the editing on that preview (and most music videos).

Just show me; I have the attention span and don't need flash edits every 3 seconds like the rest of TV.

PBS doc looks good; looking forward....
posted by CrowGoat at 9:09 PM on November 4, 2013 [4 favorites]


effing awesome

Too awesome to be viewed hereabouts.

[Sigh.]
posted by Mister Bijou at 9:09 PM on November 4, 2013 [2 favorites]


Everytime I watch him play, no matter how many other great guitarists there are in the world, and there are many... Nothing nothing nothing I have seen compares to cybernetic interaction between Jimi and Guitar. They are truly one entity. Smooth, silky, buttery, delicious, beautiful in motion and sound. Fluid and one with the guitar, no second thoughts, no stuttering, no staccatic motion, no spasmodic herky jerky, just pure elegance. Pure sex, pure music, pure soul.
posted by symbioid at 9:11 PM on November 4, 2013 [5 favorites]


Why is everyone in the crowd sitting down. what is wrong with them.
posted by empath at 9:21 PM on November 4, 2013 [1 favorite]


Jimi Hendrix being dead is proof that time travel will never happen.
posted by Catblack at 9:37 PM on November 4, 2013 [4 favorites]


Good recording though.

It sounds fantastic, but it also sounds like some very good engineers and producers have spent a ton of time doing a ton of work to restore it and make it sound that good using every state-of-the-art digital audio tool available.

I'm of two minds about it. On the one hand, I hear the engineering on it and part of me is like "come on, now - that's been worked over so much." On the other hand, Hendrix sounding so amazing - how can I complain?
posted by The World Famous at 9:38 PM on November 4, 2013 [3 favorites]


Jimi Hendrix being dead is proof that time travel will never happen.

By the end of 1973, Jimi Hendrix' extraordinary talent and charisma had led him to become more and more popular. Supported by fellow revolutionary leaders Janis Joplin, Brian Jones, and Duane Allman, Hendrix eventually led a hippie revolution to peacefully overthrow the U.S. government, finally taking over control in 1975 - the year that would prove to be the last of Nixon's administration.

The ousted government officials - aggressive, totalitarian conservatives with a vision for transformation of the U.S. and subjugation of the hippies - formed an underground resistance movement. Their two young resistance leaders were up-and-coming Nixon Administration darlings who had crazy new ideas and who had the benefit of being the only two people in that administration not murdered by fellow conservatives in the free-market shantytowns to which the political right banished itself in a flagrant display of the values it claimed were superior to those of the new youth movement. Their names? Well, the rebels called them "The Double D's" But their real names were Dick and Donald.

For decades, the Double D's worked with the best and brightest of their movement, ultimately kidnapping liberal scientists and waterboarding them until they agreed to develop the technological advancement that would allow the master plan to be realized - the brainchild of the more ruthless of the Double D's - the one we know today as the former Vice President of the United States.

But, as Donald pointed out, there were too many unknown unknowns, and the time travel device would only work once. They couldn't take any chances, so they decided they had to send someone young and strong. No matter how much Dick wanted to be the time-traveling assassin, his heart just wasn't strong enough for the task.

So they set out to find the perfect traveler. In the year 2002, they found their traveler in a young kid from just south of London. They knew he would have to be a great guitar player if he was to infiltrate the inner circle of the leftist music revolutionaries, so they trained him.

For three years, the traveler was trained, until his skill with a Gibson SG, a 335, or a Fender Stratocaster nearly matched that of Hendrix (he could only play a Tele if it had a Strat neck, oddly enough). He didn't have Hendrix' instinct - he was a little too precise, not quite soulful enough. But he had just what it would take to get in close with Hendrix' inner circle and distract the young revolutionaries, who would mistake his guitar skill with some sort of divine origin.

On October 1, 2005, the traveler entered the time travel apparatus. The dials were set, and he was sent back to October 1, 1963. The Double D's had done their research, and they knew the traveler had one chance to kill an up and coming guitar player in London just before an audition and take his place, entering the inner circle of 1960s rock and roll by the method with the highest statistical probability of leading to rock and roll immortality: Playing lead guitar for John Mayall and the Bluesbreakers.

The traveler found his mark, murdered him, and showed up at the audition, introducing himself as "Eric Clapton." From there, he put the plan in motion. He didn't need to kill the Beatles; breaking them up was all it took to derail their part in the revolution (well, you know). Brian Jones: Dead. Hendrix: Dead. Jopin: Dead. Duane Allman was the hardest one - "Clapton" got too close. He couldn't bring himself to kill Duane directly with a drug overdose like he did to the others. Instead, he sabotaged Duane's bike and waited. Berry Oakley was an accident, of course. By then, "Clapton" the traveler had been driven mad by time travel and murder. His mission completed, he nevertheless continued to kill. Moon, Bonham, Bolan, Ronson, Bonn Scott, Ian Curtis, and the list goes on.

Jimi Hendrix being dead is proof that time travel will never happen? Oh, no, my friend. Hendrix' death - and Clapton's life - are proof that time travel is real. The question is - who's next?
posted by The World Famous at 10:38 PM on November 4, 2013 [35 favorites]


Did he tune to Eb? I think so.
posted by thelonius at 1:50 AM on November 5, 2013


Those unable to view the video should try this version on youtube. If that doesn't work, try the audio-only version.
posted by Rhomboid at 2:46 AM on November 5, 2013


Watching the video again i want to echo what was said above about Jimi being perfectly in sync with his instrument but also another thing: On any other human that's ever lived the clothes Hendrix wore would look ridiculous. But somehow he always looks badass.
posted by wabbittwax at 4:27 AM on November 5, 2013 [2 favorites]


Why is everyone in the crowd sitting down. what is wrong with them.

That's how concerts were back then. You'd go to the show, with some blankets, find a spot, pitch your camp with some friends, and lay back and let the music happen to you. It was pretty nice, actually.
posted by Thorzdad at 5:24 AM on November 5, 2013 [4 favorites]


After a plethora of also-found footage where he looks tired and shagged out after a long squawk, pre-post-gypsies, it's great to see him absolutely on like here. Damned inspiring too. And Olympic White was his Strat (albeit with maple fretboard - no worries!). I wonder if that ends up being the one he gave Frank Zappa. (On review, no that one looks to be sunburst)

Reminds me of Clapton's quote Re: Jimi, something to the effect that the musical stage in England then was set for that guitarist to break out, and that "It could have been anyone, but it had to be him."
posted by petebest at 5:26 AM on November 5, 2013


Well, I still can't hear this without thinking of this.
posted by koeselitz at 6:02 AM on November 5, 2013 [4 favorites]


> On any other human that's ever lived the clothes Hendrix wore would look ridiculous. But somehow he always looks badass.

My favorite performance outfit from those days was a pair of Tony Lamas, red velvet corduroy bell-bottoms, a black and silver satin snakeskin shirt, blue aviator sunglasses and a rumpled black kid's cowboy hat with chin-strap. It got me exactly the kind of attention I was after back then.

Of course, looking at photos from those days, now I think I looked like a bozo. Jimi, however, will look badass forever.
posted by Enron Hubbard at 7:26 AM on November 5, 2013 [1 favorite]


I love how in this interview/demo, the guy asks Adrian Belew to discuss some specific elements of Hendrix's guitar style and vocabulary, and Belew just tells him "no". Like, if someone wants to copy Hendrix, let them at least go do the copying work themselves.
posted by thelonius at 7:31 AM on November 5, 2013


Wonderful stuff. (And a big thank you to Rhomboid for the YouTube links.) But here's a belated pro tip to the camera person: When filming Hendrix, always keep his guitar IN the frame kthxbi
posted by soundofsuburbia at 8:05 AM on November 5, 2013


The reminiscences of a 16-year-old at that 1968 gig... posted in 2006.
posted by swlabr at 8:25 AM on November 5, 2013


This performance of Fox(e)y Lady is part of the film Hear My Train A Comin that premiers tonight on PBS. The linked article says 9pm, but it's 8pm in Austin, so check your local listings if you want to catch it.
posted by Daddy-O at 8:47 AM on November 5, 2013


From swlabr's link,

The woman who owns the footage (her late husband promoted the festival) also has four track tapes of the show. Eddie Kramer engineered Hendrix's set.

Ahhh. That might account for some of the great sound.
posted by petebest at 2:14 PM on November 5, 2013


This performance of Fox(e)y Lady is part of the film Hear My Train A Comin that premiers tonight on PBS.

And this is why they invented remote DVR access. Thanks!
posted by TwoWordReview at 3:31 PM on November 5, 2013


Anyone watching PBS? It's great but there is too much talking.
posted by maggieb at 6:39 PM on November 5, 2013


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