20 Worst Figures in American History
August 13, 2003 11:53 AM   Subscribe

The 20 Worst Figures in American History, as selected by 39 right-wing bloggers selected by Right Wing News. For balance, they also asked 36 left-wing bloggers for their list.
[via Mark A. R. Kleiman, who has some interesting commentary; more inside]
posted by kirkaracha (82 comments total)
 
The Right List

Honorable Mentions: Ted Bundy (5), Jane Fonda (5), John Wayne Gacy (5), John Walker Lindh (5), Joe McCarthy (5), Michael Moore (5), Boss Tweed (5)

17) Franklin Delano Roosevelt (6)
17) John Walker (6)
17) Lee Harvey Oswald (6)
17) Robert Byrd (6)
16) Aldrich Ames (7)
14) Richard Nixon (8)
14) Aaron Burr (8)
12) Al Sharpton (9)
12) Charles Manson (9)
8) Timothy McVeigh (10)
8) Lyndon Johnson (10)
8) Hillary Clinton (10)
8) John Wilkes Booth (10)
7) Alger Hiss (12)
6) Noam Chomsky (13)
4) Jesse Jackson (14)
4) Jimmy Carter (14)
3) Bill Clinton (15)
2) Benedict Arnold (19)
1) The Rosenbergs (15) & Julius Rosenberg (5) (20 total votes)

The Left List

Honorable Mentions: Boss Tweed (5), Roger Taney (5), James Earl Ray (5), Charles Manson (5), Rush Limbaugh (5), Jerry Falwell (5), Roy Cohn (5), Dick Cheney (5), John C. Calhoun (5)

20) The Rosenbergs (3) + Julius Rosenberg (3) (6 total votes)
20) Pat Robertson (6)
20) Oliver North (6)
20) William Randolph Hearst (6)
20) Aaron Burr (6)
20) Aldrich Ames (6)
18) George Lincoln Rockwell (7)
18) Robert McNamara (7)
14) Richard Mellon Scaife (8)
14) Lee Harvey Oswald (8)
14) Charles Coughlin (8)
14) Strom Thurmond (8)
13) Ronald Reagan (9)
12) George Wallace (10)
11) Andrew Jackson (12)
9) Jefferson Davis (13)
9) George W. Bush (13)
6) Benedict Arnold (14)
6) Henry Kissinger (14)
6) John Wilkes Booth (14)
3) Timothy McVeigh (16)
3) Nathan Bedford Forrest (16)
3) J. Edgar Hoover (16)
2) Richard Nixon (25)
1) Joseph McCarthy (26)
posted by kirkaracha at 11:55 AM on August 13, 2003


"Forgive your enemies, but never forget their faces" -JFK
posted by nofundy at 12:00 PM on August 13, 2003


Thomas Jefferson and FDR made America great. To think otherwise is dangerous.
posted by the fire you left me at 12:00 PM on August 13, 2003


fire: I agree with the first half of your statement. the second half is a bit scary.


I'm also disturbed that Corey Haim didn't make either list.
posted by jonmc at 12:04 PM on August 13, 2003


This is embarassingly bad. The right-wing bloggers are being ridiculous when they put Bill and Hillary Clinton and Noam Chomsky on the list, and frighteningly out of touch with reality by not including Joseph McCarthy. The left-wing bloggers include Strom Thurmond, which is ridiculous, considering that for as racist as he was, he was also pretty ineffectual at stopping the civil rights movement.

This was pretty much a useless project, so it shouldn't be surprising that it resulted in a useless list. Nothing good could possibly have come out of this blatant party-line trolling. I'm disappointed in the bloggers that participated.
posted by Hildago at 12:05 PM on August 13, 2003


those are interesting lists, kirkaracha. where have i seen them before?
posted by quonsar at 12:05 PM on August 13, 2003


I do not agree with you on FDR, and I do not see Jefferson on either list.
posted by thirteen at 12:06 PM on August 13, 2003


"The 20 Worst Figures in American History"

Twiggy should be on there, she had no figure at all.
posted by mr_crash_davis at 12:06 PM on August 13, 2003


Good post kirkaracha. I'd like to say that, despite their human flaws, Reagan, Kissinger and to some extent McCarthy would be on my list of american heroes.
posted by 111 at 12:06 PM on August 13, 2003


I once did a list like this for a college history class that covered the civil war to the present. Like these lists, the class list was skewed towards recent luminaries, making it largely petty and personal (half the class thought the worst president ever was Bush I, the other thought Clinton was the worst ever).
posted by mathowie at 12:08 PM on August 13, 2003


Thread moved fast. My reply was to fire.
posted by thirteen at 12:08 PM on August 13, 2003


must...not...feed...the...troll....
[tears self way from computer]
posted by notsnot at 12:09 PM on August 13, 2003


At least right and left agree that killing presidents and blowing up buildings is bad. Otherwise we have the range of the expected to the damn silly.

On preview: I see we have the same in the comments already too.
posted by orange swan at 12:12 PM on August 13, 2003


The heavy reliance on recent history tends to show the lack of real thought and research into the choices made, and more on pop culture/personal biases.

I see a lack of pre-20th century figures. I'm surprised Al Capone didn't make anyone's list, if you're going to stick to 20th century people, as well.
posted by rich at 12:15 PM on August 13, 2003


Saw this last week and thought WTF, lame. No true hearted politician should be named. Concluded, they did a public service, not what everone liked yet elected through democracy and their job is politcs, look it up in the dictionary, you already know what they will do, like it or not.
posted by thomcatspike at 12:17 PM on August 13, 2003


Why does the right like Timothy McVeigh so much? Is it a second amendment thing?
posted by herc at 12:18 PM on August 13, 2003


Runner up: Ted Bundy

I would think that Ted's crimes would be somewhat mitigated by his fine work for the Washington state Republican party.
posted by 2sheets at 12:22 PM on August 13, 2003


those are interesting lists, kirkaracha. where have i seen them before?

Ummm...on the two pages I linked to?
posted by kirkaracha at 12:24 PM on August 13, 2003


Why do you think "the right" likes Tim McVeigh? And what does blowing people up have to do with the 2nd Amendment?
posted by Snyder at 12:24 PM on August 13, 2003


I think it's interesting that the positions of Joe McCarthy and the Rosenbergs are essentially switched on the two lists. Enter that piece of data into the Oversimplificoextrapolatron, and the punch cards tell you where the two sides stand on the freedom vs. security issue.
posted by MonkeyMeat at 12:26 PM on August 13, 2003


Both lists served primarily from the same problem almost every top (whatever) list suffers from -- a lack of perspective... which is why I don't think the Clintons or Reagan belong on a "worst American" list.
posted by dagnyscott at 12:29 PM on August 13, 2003


Why don't Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson make either list while Benedict Arnold makes both? I don't understand this. All three were military traitors to the United States, and I think there is a very convincing argument that Lee and Jackson were worse, since they came much closer to destroying the Union than Arnold did.

Not to mention that between them, they were responsible for the deaths of more American soldiers than any foreign enemy the US has ever faced.
posted by thewittyname at 12:31 PM on August 13, 2003


Why does the right like Timothy McVeigh so much? Is it a second amendment thing?

I wouldn't say that the right "likes" McVeigh at all. Geez, he came in as the eighth worst figure in American History -- tied with Hillary Clinton and just ahead of Charles Manson. In my opinion, that's pretty bad.
posted by Durwood at 12:31 PM on August 13, 2003


Yeah, both lists seem to have a problem with short memory. After all, I would have thought that Eugene Debbs would have made the Cons list at the very least as a figurehead of the labour and trust-busting reforms of the early 20th century. What the heck are political commentators such as Moore and Limbaugh doing on both lists. A suprising point of light is Andrew Jackson's mention but if you are going to throw up Jackson, why not Kit Carson?
posted by KirkJobSluder at 12:32 PM on August 13, 2003


Carrot Top should have been number one on both those lists. On all "worst" lists involving people, Carrot Top should be there.
posted by Salmonberry at 12:33 PM on August 13, 2003


I would think that Ted's crimes would be somewhat mitigated by his fine work for the Washington state Republican party.

Funny, I thought the same thing about the Rosenbergs (#20 at the left-wing list) and their unabashed work for soviet communism.
posted by 111 at 12:38 PM on August 13, 2003


Salmonberry is correct.

Gallagher should be on there, too.
posted by Sidhedevil at 12:38 PM on August 13, 2003


Frightening that the lists are basically filled with political opposites of those that made the lists to begin with. If I made a list of the twenty worst figures in American history, terrorists, serial killers and others of that ilk would make up the bulk of the list. To suggest that Bill Clinton is worse than Timoth McVeigh or that Ronald Reagan is worse than Charles Manson is absolutely insane.
posted by bargle at 12:38 PM on August 13, 2003


Take away my lefty card, I didn't know the name Nathan Bedford Forrest, and he's right up there.
posted by rainbaby at 12:39 PM on August 13, 2003


Robert E Lee was an honorable man, even if he was on the 'wrong side'. He didn't start the war, and he wasn't a murderous evil man. If anything, he kept the war 'civil' for lack of a better word.

Arnold is more of a question.. serving his own personal goals above that of the cause he signed up for voluntarily.

I mean, you could hang the Rockerfellers, Carnegies and their ilk up. I see Hearst made the list, though lower down..

Billy the Kid, maybe? Or the cattle ranchers? Architects of Manifest Destiny?
posted by rich at 12:50 PM on August 13, 2003


I don't know if it qualifies as more righty or lefty, but I know one thing, I sure do hate Tom Green.
posted by dhoyt at 12:54 PM on August 13, 2003


I sure do hate Tom Green.

He's Canadian.

I would like to see this question asked of a sampling of right and left wing historians. Much more interesting.
posted by PinkStainlessTail at 12:56 PM on August 13, 2003


...to some extent McCarthy would be on my list of american heroes

Whhhhhhhhhhhaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa?

/ jon stewart
posted by Stynxno at 12:59 PM on August 13, 2003


God, this is fantastically stupid.

I saw people posting about this a week or two ago when it was e-mailed to those certain bloggers, and that's just why these lists are pointless and irrelevant.

To start, the selection is so small as to discredit any statistical percentage- 35 people ranking 20 items? In which the pool of potentials numbers the hundreds of millions, the fact that there were that many duplicate votes is peculiar enough.

Second, there's not even a shred of specialization or authority here. The criteria for making a decision on the character of a person is set at... having a weblog? Did the people sending out the list here actually think the left-wingers wouldn't pick right-wingers and vice-versa? The fact that these bloggers were selected and e-mailed the questionaire obviously indicates the creator's desire to spark partisan rankings.

The very nature of the lists define the desire to indicate that the views of someone contrary to yours makes them un-American: regardless of your opinion of them, Michael Moore and Ronald Reagan both did what they did(do) because of their LOVE for this country... outside of any illegal actions, the only reason you would consider them "horrible Americans" would be because you disagree with their respective desires to make their country better. Are the settlers that shaped this nation good Americans for doing so? Are they bad for all the natives they slaughtered? The soldiers in the Mexican war- good or bad? The scientists at Alamgordo? The original patriots- the men that chose to CREATE America- OWNED PEOPLE. Well?

There is a difference between horrible people and horrible Americans, and all these lists do is exploit that idea that the latter isn't as blatant in being completely based on personal opinion. Jesus tap-dancing Christ- Jimmy Carter is the fourth worst American who should rot in hell for... what? All the fucking HOMES he's built?
posted by XQUZYPHYR at 1:00 PM on August 13, 2003


Why don't Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson.
Think the war paid them their dues. Mr Lee's house Arlington cemetery, home of the first dead Union soldier. Stonewall, uh his men shot him. Both were respected men by both sides. It's all about respect whom you hate or like.

Funny, I thought the same thing about the Rosenbergs (#20 at the left-wing list) and their unabashed work for soviet communism.
Be careful the jury is still out on this one, we are now seeing the actual documents.
posted by thomcatspike at 1:03 PM on August 13, 2003


McCarthy would be on my list of american heroes.

I agree...anyone who could tolerate Edgar Bergen's hand up his off-ramp for forty years is a hero to us all.

Oh. Never mind.
posted by LinusMines at 1:05 PM on August 13, 2003


Thank you, XQUZYPHYR... you said exactly what I was trying to figure out how to say without dissolving into a string of obscenities...
posted by COBRA! at 1:09 PM on August 13, 2003


Good post kirkaracha. I'd like to say that, despite their human flaws, Reagan, Kissinger and to some extent McCarthy would be on my list of american heroes.

But, seriously folks....

Try the veal.
posted by dhoyt at 1:16 PM on August 13, 2003


McCarthy would be on my list of american heroes.

How long has Ann Coulter been posting on MeFi?
posted by monkey.pie.baker at 1:23 PM on August 13, 2003


US right wing media have spent the last 10 years attacking Bill Clinton -- it's almost surprising that he didn't end up being #1. On a list not made by "pundits" but by average people, he probably would. Then again, Ann Coulter probably contributed to the inclusion of FDR, and to the top ranking of the Rosenbergs. Never mind that the only person who may actually have helped the Soviets somewhat, David Greenglass, was just sentenced to 10 years for turning his family in (he later admitted perjury). But hey, revisionist history is a-okay if it's for your own country!
posted by Eloquence at 1:24 PM on August 13, 2003


Well yeah. There are just so many people left off of this list. What about Nathan Bedford Forrest, the founder of America's homespun terrorist movement the KKK? Capone probably should be up there. If we are going to nominate contemporary scum, I would put Matthew Hale of the World Church of the Creator on the list. And what about terrorist apologist and National Security Advisor Elliot Abrams?
posted by KirkJobSluder at 1:26 PM on August 13, 2003


"pundits"

Hah!
posted by zekinskia at 1:40 PM on August 13, 2003


Never mind that the only person who may actually have helped the Soviets somewhat, David Greenglass,

The only person!!! It was a shameful spy ring!!! Talk about eloquent revisionism!

ps: didn't Greenglass get 15 years?
posted by 111 at 1:46 PM on August 13, 2003


to some extent McCarthy would be on my list of american heroes.

You and the liquor companies.
posted by Mayor Curley at 1:50 PM on August 13, 2003


Well without FDR the UK would have been crushed under the nazi jackboot, he was a true friend to us when there was a vociferous campaign to ensure that the US maintained its version of splendid isolation. Not bad for a commie (sorry democrat).
posted by johnnyboy at 1:52 PM on August 13, 2003


This just in -- political discourse on the Internet is characterized by unflinching partisanship and shortsightedness. We'll have more on this shocking story as it develops...
posted by monkey.pie.baker at 1:54 PM on August 13, 2003


Johnnyboy- not to mention all the starving people that he hopped in to help when his predecessor just wanted them to melt away in some sort of experiment in Social Darwinism.

See, that's FDR's crime. If he had just let those people starve, their family lines would have stopped and we wouldn't have poor people anymore! Also, he let darkies into the Navy.
posted by Mayor Curley at 1:59 PM on August 13, 2003


Kissinger

Yeah, nobody makes good old fashioned American heroes better than war criminals.
posted by Ufez Jones at 2:08 PM on August 13, 2003


FDR's crime was to provoke a war. Bush has not yet gotten around to messing with the Constitution as much as that old Judas.

Anybody miss Harry Hopkins Hat? I did not think so.
posted by thirteen at 2:12 PM on August 13, 2003


Binary politics is soooo 20th century.
posted by spazzm at 2:12 PM on August 13, 2003


FDR's crime was to provoke a war.

Shit, you know, I was fooled into believing that that whole suprise attack on Pear Harbor provoked the war.

Why I bet Franklin himself dropped the bomb on the Arizona.
posted by thewittyname at 2:17 PM on August 13, 2003



Shit, you know, I was fooled into believing that that whole suprise attack on Pear Harbor provoked the war.


I think you were. If Pearl Harbor provoked the war, what provoked the attack on Pearl Harbor?
posted by thirteen at 2:19 PM on August 13, 2003


Why, it was Franklin Roosevelt! How silly of everyone with half a brain to think differently!
posted by Hildago at 2:23 PM on August 13, 2003


I thought it was weird that the Rosenbergs appeared on both lists.
posted by kavasa at 2:25 PM on August 13, 2003


FDR's crime was to provoke a war.

What the hell are you talking about? Did he poke Japan with a sharp stick? Save your paranoid "knew about and ignored Pearl Harbor threat" conspiracy theory for the doctor. Go and hand out leaflets about Vince Foster's murder or something.

what provoked the attack on Pearl Harbor?

According to the Japanese, a strong suspicion that the US would enter the war and a desire to cripple our Pacific presence before we did. And they were right, too, because we weren't going to let Germany take over Europe, and we weren't going to let a cruel, expansionist empire take over the Pacific.
posted by Mayor Curley at 2:26 PM on August 13, 2003


Why, it was Franklin Roosevelt! How silly of everyone with half a brain to think differently!
Try using the whole brain then. Did the Japanese people historicly hate Hawaii in your imagination? What was the benefit to Japan in bringing the states into the war? There is documentation of FDR's involvment in Japanese affairs that are not in line with the way a neutral country would behave. Pearl harbor was the Japanese responce to FDR's actions in the South Pacific. I am not justifying the attack, I am saying it would not have happened if FDR had not done what he did.
posted by thirteen at 2:28 PM on August 13, 2003


XQUZYPHYR -

Despite the title kirkaracha gave this page, the actual titles of the linked pages are "Bloggers Select The 20 Worst Figures In American History." This isn't commentary on America, it's commentary on political bloggers.

Anyhoo, back to the evil of Roosevelt...
posted by badstone at 2:28 PM on August 13, 2003


what provoked the attack on Pearl Harbor?

For the Republicans let me share. FDR’s Republican running mate for Presidency was his choice as Secretary of the Defense (or Navy), because he knew he would beef up the US Navy. Will add, his appointment was not popular by the people whom backed FDR as President too.
At the time understanding Japan with its Emperor/religion you would have seen the writing on the wall too. Japan felt any country occupying South Pacific land was a threat on their God; why do you think they were so barbaric to their neighbors? Remember FDR married the niece of Teddy Roosevelt, whom also grew up in his household.
posted by thomcatspike at 3:01 PM on August 13, 2003


Remember FDR married Teddy Roosevelt's niece whom also grew up in his household.
posted by thomcatspike at 3:04 PM on August 13, 2003


Almost good for a laugh, but fell short somehow. Maybe it was the shitty page design.
posted by scarabic at 3:14 PM on August 13, 2003


Thirteen, I don't know if there were chapters missing from your history book or something, but World War II was actually going on before Pearl Harbor.

Most people think it started when Hitler invaded Czechoslovakia. If you have some theory of how Roosevelt "provoked" that, I'm sure we'll all be fascinated to hear about it.
posted by Sidhedevil at 3:16 PM on August 13, 2003


We're arguing about Franklin Roosevelt?

Oh my God, Francis E. Dec has risen from the grave.

Go on. Someone needs to start talking about "the polio paralyzed legless drug addict idiotic suicidal Tsarina fag..."
posted by Katemonkey at 3:21 PM on August 13, 2003


In regards to the seemingly undifferentiated mix of harmless "talkers" and insane killers on both lists; that's what you get when you ask a diverse group of people to come up with a combined ranking list. Some of the bloggers obviously hate anyone who has opinions that differ from their own (extremists in other words - people who honestly feel the world would be a better place if they were king) - hence the pathetic inclustion of Michael Moore / Strom Thurmon. Other bloggers were obviously far more intelligent, thoughtful and honest in their selection of truly nasty pieces of work like Lee Harvey Oswald / Joseph McCarthy. Big suprise; the blogosphere is filled with both dimwitted extremist reactionaries and multifaceted thinkers.
posted by Jimbob at 3:28 PM on August 13, 2003


I thought it was weird that the Rosenbergs appeared on both lists.

It appears as if the bloggers were given a list of names, and asked to rank them. Otherwise there would be a greater diversity of names on the lists.
posted by frykitty at 4:47 PM on August 13, 2003


Why does everyone hate communism? I mean, I hate totalitarianism as much as the next guy, but just because someone believes in communism doesn't mean that he's the devil.
posted by bshort at 4:49 PM on August 13, 2003


Take away my lefty card, I didn't know the name Nathan Bedford Forrest, and he's right up there.

Founded the KKK, dude.

Why does everyone hate communism? I mean, I hate totalitarianism as much as the next guy, but just because someone believes in communism doesn't mean that he's the devil.

My theory is that the Cold War and all the spin around that taught people to believe that communism was the opposite of Freedom, Democracy, and All That Is Good And Ordained By God.

Communism is the opposite of CAPITALISM, no more, no less.* It's Fascism and Totalitarianism that's the opposite of Freedom etc.

*-That's probably not a perfect opposite. I don't pretend to know everything, so if you have facts that disprove that, just pretend I didn't post. Or correct me. But don't be snarky.

to some extent McCarthy would be on my list of american heroes.

You know, it's not 111's posting this that bothers me so much as the fact that, in the last two years, the political discourse has shifted to such a right/authoritarian degree that, in relatively normal circumstances, this can, in any way whatsoever, be considered a normal opinion.

Jesus... I remember when saying something like this was akin to saying "Hitler did have some good ideas."

posted by nath at 4:59 PM on August 13, 2003


Sidhedevil: While I enjoy your snarky tone, I think you will also find that the United States was not an official combatant until Pearl Harbor occurred. I said Roosevelt provoked a war, I did not say he started WWII.

I could go on, but I do not think I need to explain my position to anyone here but you in regard to the semantics of my posts.

thomcatspike: I think you are arguing the other side of the issue, and if so I am glad.
posted by thirteen at 5:15 PM on August 13, 2003


My problem with Communism is that as a governing body, it does not leave any room for you not to be a Communist. As things are, people are free to form their communities as they choose, and can set up a working commune without affecting those who have no interest in that sort of thing. Once you nationalize everything your choices kind of dwindle.
posted by thirteen at 5:20 PM on August 13, 2003


Well, gee. I consider myself a pretty hardcore left-winger and I can see why FDR is disliked. He expanded and abused presidential privilege more than any other American president. Conservatives dislike his part in legitimizing the concept of a public safety net through anti-poverty programs such as the CCC and social security. He had problematic relationships with both congress and the supreme court, and attempted to twist the rules to get around both of them.

In regards to WWII. It seems rather obvious that the U.S. was engaged in a cold war with the Axis on the side of England and France in the mid 30s up to Peal Harbor. The U.S. was funneling large amounts of supplies and weaponry to the British, French and Chinese. American airmen were secretly assisting China well before Pearl Harbor. The U.S. used the return of the Japanese ambassador's ashes as an opportunity to photograph Japanese Naval installation. The U.S. was busy fortifying bases at Guam, Pearl Harbor and in the Philippines (and as a side note, my grandfather was transferred to Alaska as part of a preemptive fortification of Alaskan ports). Although Japan and the U.S. were in negotiations, neither were acting in good faith. The U.S. knew that its demands would be seen not only as politically impossible in Japan, but downright insulting. Japan used its diplomats to stall the Americans while preparing a sneak naval attack.

Basically, war was inevitable with Japan no matter what. Perhaps FDR misjudged in regards to Perl Harbor (I don't think anyone could have fingered Perl Harbor as the site), but even my grandfather spending a cold winter in Alaska knew that it was going to happen sooner or later.
posted by KirkJobSluder at 5:25 PM on August 13, 2003


nath: My theory is that the Cold War and all the spin around that taught people to believe that communism was the opposite of Freedom, Democracy, and All That Is Good And Ordained By God.

It goes back further than that to concerns about the labour movement and the labour riots at the start of the 20th century. The Soviet revolution set off a massive red scare that rivaled that of the 1950s. (Of course if anyone had it coming it was the Romanovs.) Which is why I don't see Eugene Debbs on the Conservative hate list.
posted by KirkJobSluder at 5:30 PM on August 13, 2003


ALL ASSEMBLED: No matter what your politics, don't you think that, with a little thought, you could come up with a really comprehensive list? To be fair, start from the Am Revolution forward chronologically or something (just to balance out the "moderns"), instead of rating by "awfulness". Nominate your favorite villains.

Maybe we can have voting later.

Some of my "nominees" include: Simon Girty, the Harpe Brothers, William "Bloody Bill" Anderson, Henry Wirz, and H.H. Holmes
posted by kablam at 5:52 PM on August 13, 2003


I tried to come with a list of my own, but traitors and murderers have pretty small effects compared to the big problems: slavery, poverty, war, discrimination. And no one person is responsible for any of them.
posted by goethean at 6:26 PM on August 13, 2003


In American history? How the hell did Mike Moore have such an impact on American life? How bout Charlton Heston? Why wasn't he on the left side? There have been some pretty awful people in American history...rapists, murderers, child molesters...And yet poor Hillary Clinton who has had no real affect made it onto the list. Oh my, what have we come to.
posted by Raichle at 6:27 PM on August 13, 2003


Why does everyone hate communism?

Those damned communists killed Balin and Boromir and laid siege to Helm's Deep. They are a menace to the free peoples of Middle Earth.

Oh wait, those were Orcs. Never mind.
posted by homunculus at 7:22 PM on August 13, 2003


As things are, people are free to form their communities as they choose, and can set up a working commune without affecting those who have no interest in that sort of thing

*cough* Waco *cough*
posted by inpHilltr8r at 7:43 PM on August 13, 2003



*cough* Waco *cough*


Point sadly taken.
posted by thirteen at 8:23 PM on August 13, 2003


L. Ron Hubbard
posted by moonbiter at 8:47 PM on August 13, 2003


My team's better than your team.
posted by timeistight at 9:56 PM on August 13, 2003


Cool, Kirk. I didn't know that. It's always good to learn a little history when you can.
posted by nath at 2:05 AM on August 14, 2003


MonkeyMeat- Where can I buy an Oversimplificoextrapolatron?
posted by Pericles at 4:48 AM on August 14, 2003


Apparently, right wing bloggers hate Richard Nixon more than do left wing bloggers.

111 - I too have admiration for Henry Kissinger's notion of RealPolitic; except, that is when it led him to do things like send B-52's to bomb hundreds of thousands of peasant farmers (in Southeast Asian countries which the US was not actually at war with). A bad, bad man, that Henry K.
posted by troutfishing at 5:23 AM on August 14, 2003


Maybe I'm too much of a conspiracy theorist, but I have a hard time including Lee Harvey Oswald on a list of anything but scapegoats.
posted by alumshubby at 10:57 AM on August 14, 2003


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