Army's new uniform code to include berets.
October 17, 2000 12:30 PM   Subscribe

Army's new uniform code to include berets.
"...this "symbol of excellence" once reserved for members of elite units will be made available to all soldiers as "a signal to the young that we are moving, we are changing."

This really belongs in The Onion.
posted by ratbastard (13 comments total)
 
when I first glanced at that, I thought it said

"army's new uniform to include breasts."

grrl power,
rcb
posted by rebeccablood at 1:32 PM on October 17, 2000


It is interesting to watch the HR and Marketing tactics of the armed forces change....i mean really...is a different hat going to make you feel better about yourself?

[i thought it said breasts also...]
posted by th3ph17 at 1:33 PM on October 17, 2000


> i thought it said breasts also

That would definitely improve my morale.
posted by ratbastard at 1:43 PM on October 17, 2000


Not that I have the greatest fasion sense, but I think the codpiece is an under-rated uniform accessory.
posted by schlomo at 2:12 PM on October 17, 2000


lol definitely belongs in The Onion....
posted by grank at 2:45 PM on October 17, 2000


they are having a fairly major problem retaining junior officers right now... I can't help but think this will be seen as the PR ploy it is, and will serve more to burn the feeling of goodwill toward the beret than it will to lift armed forces morale in general.

-mars
posted by Mars Saxman at 2:45 PM on October 17, 2000


Jeez. I remember back in post-Vietnam when they got rid of the traditional sailor uniform and rolled out officer-type suitcoats to practically everybody. That didn't help much either.

I betcha the "elite units" who are no longer so unique are gonna be mighty pissed.
posted by dhartung at 3:03 PM on October 17, 2000


They can keep the berets. If they want me to join, all they have to do is offer adamantium claws and a bulletproof invisi-shield. And maybe a cool decoder ring, or something. Chicks dig decoder rings.
posted by Optamystic at 5:48 PM on October 17, 2000


Here in Australia the way they encourage people to join the army, is through ads telling you that at the end of it all you will have great qualifications in whatever field you wish to further yourself in, ie. Engeneering, Communications, all of which you will then be able to use in the commercial world if you choose to leave.

Does the US have the same kind of educational deal when you join the army?
posted by Zool at 7:13 PM on October 17, 2000


Yes, Zool....they run a really simplistic marketing campaign that appears to be aimed toward those kids who are really uncertain about their futures. They sort of make it seem like a stint in the Army will clear up all future problems.

Of course, they leave out the part about possibly becoming a bullet-riddled corpse, which, last time I checked, was a BIG problem.
posted by Optamystic at 7:34 PM on October 17, 2000


Well, yes, if you spend a few years (3 I think) in the army, they'll help pay for your college. It's a pretty good deal if you can stand being in the army.
posted by daveadams at 7:20 AM on October 18, 2000


I get a real kick out of the military these days. They're using the same marketing tactics that major companies use. TV ads during prime-time shows, with lots of flashy graphics and smiling faces. Trying to lure people in with unlikely incentives ("Join the Air Force! Fly a jet!" "Join the Navy! Pilot a carrier!"). Oh, and of course the "We'll pay for your college tuition" offer.

I wonder if there's anyone who was baited in by these ads, and had a positively miserable experience because of it. Could they sue for false advertising?

(I'm only half kidding)
posted by CrayDrygu at 8:23 AM on October 18, 2000


I don't know if anyone could really sue for false advertising, but military recruiters have a bad reputation with anyone I've talked to. They lure young directionless kids into their offices and trick them into signing up for something they wouldn't agree to if they knew all the details.

One of my distant cousins went in to sign up for army reserve duty and the recruiter managed to trick him into signing up for the full-fledged US Army, and he had to take a dishonorable discharge to get out of three years of army life. Yuck.
posted by daveadams at 11:28 AM on October 18, 2000


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