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Stonehenge Revealed!
July 22, 2005 5:21 AM   Subscribe

A former carpenter/construction worker has figured out the secret to Stonehenge and The Pyramids. Discovery Channel Canada has more (WMV, sorry). [via MoFi]
posted by ObscureReferenceMan (42 comments total)

 
Wow. I went to a brewer's guild meeting, and they were showing the movie that this guy made on a projector. I'm not sure what it had to do with brewing, but it was really interesting...
(Not sure if I'd call it THE secret to Stonehenge...)
posted by klangklangston at 5:28 AM on July 22, 2005




Slack-

Now that is freaky. The stonehenge thing, meh; the recurrence as an FPP after exactly a year, very wierd.
posted by OmieWise at 5:46 AM on July 22, 2005


Dang! I did a search, but didn't find.

I throw myself on the mercy of mathowie. Feel free to remove this FPP, and place me in the penalty box for as long as you see fit.


*slinks away under rock*
posted by ObscureReferenceMan at 5:50 AM on July 22, 2005


I don't think the Old Gods would be pleased by the removal of this FPP. The year gap is a message and mathowie would do well to heed it.

Also, it's pretty damn cool. Good post, ORM!
posted by nixerman at 5:54 AM on July 22, 2005


orm, I was just joking around. I think it's a cool post, and I missed it when I was lurking a year ago.
posted by OmieWise at 6:01 AM on July 22, 2005


I remember this from a year ago. There is new material on the website and I'm glad to see it.
posted by Enron Hubbard at 6:06 AM on July 22, 2005


Seems interesting, pity I can't read a damn thing on that site because of the crappy lay out. Anyone care to explain it to me in layman's terms? It's something with a heavy weight, two things underneath it and a thing on top of it, judging from the drawings.
posted by NekulturnY at 6:08 AM on July 22, 2005


Some forgotten technology, like the marquee tag and the animated GIF, is better left that way.
posted by sriracha at 6:12 AM on July 22, 2005


I'm not sure what it had to do with brewing

Moving barrels around, maybe?
posted by beagle at 6:29 AM on July 22, 2005


I think maybe he's moving a heavy thing by digging a hole under the heavy thing and then tilting the heavy thing into the hole. No?
posted by bingo at 6:29 AM on July 22, 2005


I lived with my octogenarian, retired engineer grandfather the summer after I finished college. One evening after I returned from a long day at work, he told me that he needed my help with a project.

Years before, he had removed an entire patio in one slab to build a septic tank underneath. The large concrete slab he had removed (I assumed with heavy equipment) and moved to another remote place on his farm where it sat until he was ready for it. Now that he had another set of hands, he wanted to move it back. I was thinking the last thing I wanted to do after working hard all day was manhandle a several ton slab of concrete the mile or so back to the house.

My grandfather grabbed a small pvc pipe leaned against the door and said, "come on." Out back the slab was already nearly in place, all he needed me for was for me to tilt the slab up so that he could get some ropes out from under it. I asked him how he'd done it all by himself. Not being a man of many words his one word reply was, "leverage."

I still have no idea how he did it, though I do know it involved a small pvc pipe, some ropes and his riding mower.
posted by Pollomacho at 6:30 AM on July 22, 2005


That guy's website reads like Time Cube.
posted by Mid at 6:32 AM on July 22, 2005


Blue-collar geniuses make my punkrock bosom swell with joy.

Glad for the repost. Obscure Reference Man, trying to live up to your name with the 1 year to the date to the hour thing?
posted by es_de_bah at 6:32 AM on July 22, 2005


That website design needs to be taken out back and shot.
posted by signal at 6:37 AM on July 22, 2005


I did a search, but didn't find
For future reference, try Google "Search Site":
Result number three
posted by beagle at 6:40 AM on July 22, 2005


Secret? What about the ramps/burial theory?
posted by nthdegx at 6:40 AM on July 22, 2005


what about the coat hanger electrocution theory?
posted by Satapher at 6:49 AM on July 22, 2005


i cant believe that guy doesnt hire some emo kid to make a site for him so you all can browse in the same sterile pastels.
posted by Satapher at 6:52 AM on July 22, 2005


It's something with a heavy weight, two things underneath it and a thing on top of it, judging from the drawings.

That looks to be one of the several techniques he's using. If you take a heavy thing, get it resting on two pivot points, then put something else heavy on one of the top edges of the larger thing, you can balance it on one of the two pivots. Then, you can rotate it, and set it back down on the other pivot and repeat the process.

This way you walk it from place to place.

One of the other techniques he seems to be using in concert with the above is the Square Wheel concept. This comes in very handy with the above walking technique because it allows you to move your counterweight from one side of the block to the other just as easily as rolling a marble.

The sled technique shown here is a particularly clever one for a reason he doesn't seem to mention (or maybe I missed it). Once you pull that block up, you can put a stop behind it, then reverse the process and pull a block nearly twice as large up the other side using the weight of your body in addition to the smaller block. You could repeat this as many times as you wanted, lifting heavier and heavier blocks in sequence.

I'd be interested in seeing his video. I'd be willing to pay 15$ for it, too, as long as it wasn't as crappy as the website. Has anyone seen it, and could recommend whether it's worth the cash?
posted by odinsdream at 6:56 AM on July 22, 2005


i cant believe that guy doesn't hire some emo kid to make a site for him so you all can browse in the same sterile pastels.

Most construction workers I know wouldn't know what an emo kid was, much less where to hire one to do his web design. Most of the ones I know wouldn't realize that the pansy with the earring that hangs around his daughter trying to get into her pants, is really his best hope for reaching the masses in the ether-world.
posted by Pollomacho at 6:58 AM on July 22, 2005


I actually only stumbled upon the original MeFi post because I was looking for a different Stonehenge tidbit. I was wondering if anybody had posted about the recent discovery of what is believed to be the quarry that the Stonehenge stones were cut from.
posted by Slack-a-gogo at 7:04 AM on July 22, 2005


i saw one of those stonehenge blocks in a hotel once
posted by Satapher at 7:31 AM on July 22, 2005


That's interesting... I had to skip ahead though as I was worried I'd go through the long-winded introduction and find his magic "Ring of Isis" is what moved the blocks.
posted by rolypolyman at 8:08 AM on July 22, 2005


I'm more curious how they transported the stones 240 miles from Wales.
posted by stbalbach at 8:11 AM on July 22, 2005


240 miles? The extraterrestrials did that part.
posted by voltairemodern at 8:39 AM on July 22, 2005


Who was it... Tesla maybe?... who said, you can move anything, even the earth, if you use a long enough lever.
posted by banished at 8:58 AM on July 22, 2005


That was Archimedes, banished.
posted by MrMoonPie at 9:25 AM on July 22, 2005


Satapher: “i cant believe that guy doesnt hire some emo kid to make a site for him so you all can browse in the same sterile pastels.

Wow, so many stereotypes, so little time.
posted by signal at 9:36 AM on July 22, 2005


*dusts off hands*

Well, that takes care of that, huh? Thank goodness such complex engineering feats can be solved by one guy. It's kinda like all those crop circles made by two old men with some rope and a wooden plank.

Gullability goes both ways.

I'm more curious how they transported the stones 240 miles from Wales.

And I'm even more curious why they transported the stones 240 miles from Wales.
posted by zardoz at 9:59 AM on July 22, 2005


"And I'm even more curious why they transported the stones 240 miles from Wales."
Same reason currency is fixed to something or the meter had an agreed upon length until recently, etc. You can't always just use the king's foot.
...well, you can, but it's stupid.

Probably was an agreed upon chunk of turf where you could send some guys to find out about when you need to plant or get ready for whatever change the stars said were coming up.
/star change in the astronomical not astrological sense.
posted by Smedleyman at 10:18 AM on July 22, 2005


How could they go 240 miles? The probability of that happening is nil. This is the real engineering feat.
posted by uni verse at 10:21 AM on July 22, 2005


The probability may be nil... except that, uh, it happened?
posted by dirtynumbangelboy at 10:48 AM on July 22, 2005


How could they go 240 miles? The probability of that happening is nil.

That's certainly an odd thing to say. Do you understand what probability actually means?

It's fairly easy to understand how they went 240 miles. If you can move the stone forward horizontally by flipping it around and around, then you just do that over, and over, and over.

Yes, it would take a long time. It did take a long time - that's why it's impressive - that's why we know the people who built it were extremely dedicated. It has nothing to do with probability, because we're not talking about the chances that one block will vanish from one site and reappear in another site, we're talking about the feasibility of moving it by force.
posted by odinsdream at 10:59 AM on July 22, 2005


Do you understand what probability actually means ?
Woah ... I was just exaggerating a bit. Anyway, I dug a bit and found most agree the bluestones were dragged and floated down the river. Whats funny is the "Millenium bluestone project" in 2001 failed to succeed in replicating their efforts, even with a 'light' stone of 3 tons. An article reads:


The bluestone was the centre of a controversial project to replicate the 4,000-year-old journey of the giant stones from the Preseli mountains in Pembrokeshire, which make up the inner circle of Stonehenge on Salisbury Plain.
But modern man was unable to achieve what his Neolithic ancestors did. Although the stone was successfully dragged 17 miles from the Preseli Hills to the Cleddau River, a series of mishaps, culmin-CERI JONES ating in a watery grave, meant that it never left Pembrokeshire.

For the past two years it has been gathering barnacles on the quayside at Milford Docks as the Heritage Lottery Fund, which bankrolled the project to the tune of £100,000 and Pembrokeshire County Council decided what to do with it.

posted by uni verse at 11:10 AM on July 22, 2005


"culminating in a water grave" sorry.
posted by uni verse at 11:19 AM on July 22, 2005


Spinal Tap had no problem transporting their bit of Stonehenge.
posted by kurumi at 11:58 AM on July 22, 2005


How could they go 240 miles? The probability of that happening is nil. This is the real engineering feat.

"I found that I, working alone, could easily move a 2400 lb. block 300 ft. per hour with little effort, and a 10,000 lb. block at 70 ft. per hour."
posted by kirkaracha at 12:43 PM on July 22, 2005


my brain hurts.
posted by centrs at 1:40 AM on July 23, 2005


Interesting post, thanks.
posted by sic at 5:15 PM on July 23, 2005


Kirkaracha: Any links or is that some obscure reference?
posted by uni verse at 10:13 AM on July 24, 2005


uni: it's from page 2 of the first link.
posted by obloquy at 11:08 AM on July 24, 2005


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