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High priced dining
November 16, 2005 11:33 PM   Subscribe

The world's most expensive restaurants, though even these eateries pale in comparison to the $37,000 lunch and the $10,000 Martini on the Rock, poured over a diamond. As a New York Times food critic defends pricey meals, it is clear that times have changed since another famous Times critic drew letters of condemnation from the Vatican for his expensive dinner in 1975, which itself was a pale shadow of the most legendary costly meal ever, that of Antony and Cleopatra.
posted by blahblahblah (38 comments total)

 
The "defends pricey meals" link puts into words perfectly what I've felt for a long time. I really don't need to add anything.

Except that as a server at an upscale restaurant it is a bright spot in my workday when a younger obviously not rich couple splurge on a $200 bottle of wine that they appreciate; much better than the tiresome table of rich assholes who never consider ordering anything less than the most expensive of everything that they then chug and scarf down.
posted by Jesse H Christ at 12:02 AM on November 17, 2005


What, French Laundry and Per Se didn't make the list?
posted by falconred at 12:19 AM on November 17, 2005


Fucking Christ was that last article poorly-written. And by a publisher, no less. You'd think she'd at least have some editor friends who could have looked that over.
posted by Civil_Disobedient at 12:26 AM on November 17, 2005


That is, quite simply, an unforgivable retelling of Roman history. And can someone tell me where she got the spelling Octavion? It doesn't appear in Perseus Project. And who the hell goes around referring to Marc Antony as Marc? Jesus wept.
posted by sbutler at 12:29 AM on November 17, 2005


I find it extremely hard to believe that the most expensive joint in Montreal is $30US as listed in the slideshow from the first link.
posted by item at 12:38 AM on November 17, 2005


Yeah I don't get this list, it doesn't make sense... are those actually the most expensive restaurants in those cities? And why are so many cities missing?
posted by cell divide at 12:42 AM on November 17, 2005


falconred - It's just the international cities in this article. The previous article has the U.S. cities. Still, like any 'top' list, there's always quibble possibilities - Picasso instead of Bradley Ogden for Vegas? Bradley Ogden is, I'm pretty sure, pricier on a chef's menu vs. chef's menu basis. Instead, they're using the Zagat prices, which are individual diner estimates of "the cost of dinner with one drink and tip". Subject to both interpretation and error, especially with "one drink" meaning a share of $500 wine, or a $2 Pepsi Blue (tm).

Still, it's interesting to see the entries from each city (and how many of them are really inspired by a few cities like Paris and San Francisco). Now, to merge these lists with travel schedule and corporate card credit limits....
posted by JoshBerman at 1:29 AM on November 17, 2005


Wow, and I thought dinner for two at Fogo de Chao was expensive at $130-140 ($50/person, plus drinks, plus tip).
posted by mrbill at 1:30 AM on November 17, 2005


I had the pleasure of dining at Daniel's in New York a few years ago. IIRC, our three's company shelled out $500 a head for the prix fixe. Unforgettable evening, (what with Bouloud coming to our table to greet us personally - to the shock and dismay of a room full of upper east siders well adorned in their thanksgiving 'bling bling'), although one must not misstate the obvious. We left dinner that night hungry.
posted by phaedon at 3:33 AM on November 17, 2005


The list is bullsht. First, 1612 yen is about $15 US. Not expensive. Second, there are many restaurants in Tokyo that'll set you back over $500. Forbes, get one factchecker.
posted by dydecker at 4:17 AM on November 17, 2005


mrbill, we ate at Elizabeth on 37th and I think we spent about $250 for the two of us. In freakin' Georgia, of all places. And this was ten years ago.
posted by alumshubby at 5:10 AM on November 17, 2005


That Forbes article was utter crap. Little more than an excuse to showcase Forbes' paying advertisers, or at least that's what they make it look like.
posted by clevershark at 5:12 AM on November 17, 2005


You're right, clevershark... it does look like a not-so-subtle advertising move (a la Food Network's "Best Of" programs). They pick relatively non-distinguished restaurants and make them out to be something more special than they really are (they may be good restaurants, but are not actually "world's best/most expensive/etc").

It's just plain dumb that they're putting sub-$100 prix-fixe meals on there when there's at least 50 places in the northeast US where you can blow well over $150 a head.
posted by rxrfrx at 6:26 AM on November 17, 2005


phaedon - huh. I went to Daniel's 2 years ago and had one of the worst dining experiences in my life there. Piss poor service and a 12 course meal that was boring, dull, uninspired and pathetic. I personally felt that my gf at the time and I were poorly treated because we were young. I had a totally different experience when I went to Tru in Chicago. Tru was an amazing experience. I wouldn't go back to Daniel's if my life depended on it.
posted by Stynxno at 6:39 AM on November 17, 2005


These places don't impress me. Aren't there golf clubs in the NYC area where the initiation fees are in the six figures? It seems like the clubhouse restaurants there would be even more exclusive then the Eagle club.
posted by afroblanca at 6:39 AM on November 17, 2005


Call me excessively mercenary, but I can't enjoy the food if I'm spending too much on it.

I dunno, maybe if I had an infinitely disposable income or something, but what with me only being in the top 11%, I don't know if I could ever stand to shell out $100 per person for a meal.

I've had very, very delicious food for very cheaply, and spent a lot of a meal that I didn't care for that much.
posted by Deathalicious at 6:40 AM on November 17, 2005


The $10,000 martini is simply a way to surprise your date with a diamond-- a diamond that you preselected. Big deal. A hokey wedding proposel is not an example of "consumers gone wild." A thousand dollar omlette-- now that is extravagant.
posted by Secret Life of Gravy at 6:49 AM on November 17, 2005


Fucking Christ was that last article poorly-written. And by a publisher, no less. You'd think she'd at least have some editor friends who could have looked that over.

What,? I, don't, understand, why, you'd, say, such, things, about, her, article, of which, she used, many commas.

AGGGGGHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!!
posted by KevinSkomsvold at 6:59 AM on November 17, 2005


any meal costing $277 better be served on Alyson Hannigan's ass.
posted by jonmc at 7:18 AM on November 17, 2005


I had the pleasure of dining at Gary Danko (Warning: 885 K Flash site) a couple of years ago when in SF for my parents' 25th.

I had no idea food could taste so good. But at over/about $150.00 per person (with drink/tip - though we were spare with the wine), it had damn well better taste good.
posted by kaseijin at 7:19 AM on November 17, 2005


...though Alan Greenspan was at the table next to us. I suppose that increased the value of the meal some...


Also: I would like to second jonmc. Alyson Hannigan's ass, indeed.
posted by kaseijin at 7:22 AM on November 17, 2005


Fucking Christ was that last article poorly-written.

I had to read it after that, and yes indeed, that was stunningly bad writing...
posted by ob at 7:57 AM on November 17, 2005


Cue David Cross:

"... About halfway through the meal, I had this amazing revelation: "You guys, this isn't worth $500! C'mon! Where's Ashton? Where is he?!""
posted by unixrat at 8:03 AM on November 17, 2005


In retrospect, apologize for the horrible writing of the last link. I was trying to find a good retelling of the relevant story, and it was 2 am, and I didn't read it that closely, and I had just been hit by a low-flying blimp, and...

Well, I just apologize. And at least William Grimes is a good writer.
posted by blahblahblah at 8:06 AM on November 17, 2005


The most I've spent on a single meal is $300 Canadian for two people on a special occasion, at Susur in Toronto. I'm no food critic, but we left stuffed (seven-course vegetarian tasting menu, plus desert, but just water to drink) with some of the best food I've ever eaten. I didn't feel guilty so much as periodically unworthy of the food being placed before me.
posted by The Card Cheat at 8:29 AM on November 17, 2005


Cue David Cross again (regarding an expensive, ostentatious dessert topped with a thin layer of edible gold):

"Tasteless, odorless gold. To eat! And I thought, 'Wow man, if that isn't the ultimate 'F___ YOU!' to poor people, then I don't know what is..."
posted by kurumi at 9:11 AM on November 17, 2005


The thing I miss most about having a real job is spending money on really good meals. Some of the best experiences of my life were at fancy restaurants spending $50-$100 per person (which isn't super expensive, I guess, but it was decadent for us). In some ways, I felt bad for people who ate like that all the time because how can you truly appreicate the experience of having amazing food and wine if you have it all the time?
posted by Kimberly at 9:19 AM on November 17, 2005



BBQ. Cooler of Bass Ale and some wine. Friends.

Priceless.
posted by fluffycreature at 9:28 AM on November 17, 2005


Alyson Hannigan's ass for $277, Alex.
posted by KevinSkomsvold at 9:31 AM on November 17, 2005


“Tru in Chicago...Tru was an amazing experience. I wouldn't go back to Daniel's if my life depended on it.”
posted by Stynxno
- My stepbrother was a chef there until very recently. I’ll pass that along to him.
Unfortunately from Chicago, I suspect you’d have to go to Texas of KC for a quality steak. Haven’t found one in NY or anywhere in California.

“Well, I just apologize. And at least William Grimes is a good writer.”
posted by blahblahblah
- I am not joe pulitzer and even I recognized this was poorly written. Still, it doesn’t make it a bad post man. And a worthwhile thread. If, for nothing else, Alyson Hannigan's ass. Which I imagine would be more of a dessert item because of it’s peachy, flutie flavor.

- I’m with you fluffycreature. I’ve been to some very top shelf places (always get strange looks when I order George Dickel - which they don’t usually have - so I *settle* for Glenmorangie, Laphroaig if I’m lucky, God help them if they try to give me Glenfiddich) but really there’s nothing like decent home cooking and good company to improve the gastronomical repast.
*burp*
posted by Smedleyman at 10:03 AM on November 17, 2005


In some ways, I felt bad for people who ate like that all the time because how can you truly appreicate the experience of having amazing food and wine if you have it all the time?

Well expensive dosent always equal good and cheap dosen't always equal bad. I've had some of the best meals of my live in dirt cheap greasy spoons.

Sadly, I have yet to dine on Alyson's ass, though. But I hold out hope; "No, garcon, utensils wont be neccessary..."
posted by jonmc at 10:15 AM on November 17, 2005


Where's Washington's Herb Farm restaurant, where meals (experiences?) go for almost $200 a person?
posted by milnak at 10:57 AM on November 17, 2005


I always thought it would be cool to own an expensive resturant where all the food (or at least the vegitables) were grown right in the building.
posted by delmoi at 11:32 AM on November 17, 2005


Speaking as someone who has dined on Alyson Hannigan's ass, I'd just like to point out that it's not all it's cracked up to be, and it cost way more than $277.

It's just a good thing I have other children.
posted by Sparx at 12:39 PM on November 17, 2005


Speaking yet again of that most glorious of asses, I am shocked - shocked, I say - to learn that she is 31...
posted by kaseijin at 1:08 PM on November 17, 2005


Fucking Christ was that last article poorly-written. And by a publisher, no less. You'd think she'd at least have some editor friends who could have looked that over.
posted by Civil_Disobedient at 12:26 AM PST on November 17


Good lord. Check out this shit: "Octavion, the guy I mentioned earlier, had an 'expunge her memory' campaign after her death because there were men all over her conquered territory, former military men, who were still loyal to her and her line, the Ptolemy."

THE GUY I MENTIONED EARLIER
posted by Optimus Chyme at 3:40 PM on November 17, 2005


Not nearly as bad as this parenthetical abomination:

A guy popularly named Pliny the Elder (to distinguish him from his nephew, Pliny the Younger) (known by some as the first historian and naturalist, by others, as the 2nd) (and writing his observations in the 1st century after Christ's death) (about 70 years after Cleopatra's suicide), was the first to publicly describe this banquet.

This reads like a high school paper done the morning of the day it was due.
posted by Civil_Disobedient at 4:23 PM on November 17, 2005


My God, it's garnished!

posted by Smedleyman at 10:36 PM on November 17, 2005


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