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Congressman Lynn Westmoreland's passions
June 16, 2006 12:24 PM   Subscribe

You may have known that Congressman Lynn Westmoreland (GA) has been a crusader for many great causes, such as HB 145, HB 180, HB 425, HB 500 and HB 637. However you may not have know that he has a second love. Which shines some light on why he has chosen to use his extensive knowledge and experience to co-sponsor H.Con.Res. 11 and H.Con.Res. 12. After listening to him explain why these two resolutions are so critical, I was almost swayed.
posted by Mr_Zero (96 comments total) 2 users marked this as a favorite

 
Thumbs up for theocracy!
posted by Zozo at 12:28 PM on June 16, 2006


yes that particular piece of Colbert skewering was beyond amusing.

That said i guess 3 out of 10 is not bad for a practicing Christian.
posted by sourbrew at 12:29 PM on June 16, 2006 [1 favorite]


"WHEREAS, "The Passion of the Christ" has been phenomenally successful, grossing over $330 million since its opening in late February 2004"

Yeah, that's a good reason to pass a resolution.
posted by 2sheets at 12:33 PM on June 16, 2006


He just wants the commandments in the building because he can't remember them.
posted by brain_drain at 12:34 PM on June 16, 2006


Unbelievable. Just unbelievable.

The Ten Commandments debate is really not about the content of the Ten Comandments (ar any religious teachings) at all-- it's about the majority asserting its right to ram its preferences up the minority's ass. All about claiming turf, prejudice, sanctimony, and parochialism-- not one iota of religious meaning.

What Would Jesus Not Do? Whatever the Republicans are promoting.
posted by ibmcginty at 12:37 PM on June 16, 2006 [1 favorite]


Youtube link, because that other one isn't cutting it for me.
posted by peeedro at 12:38 PM on June 16, 2006


*conjures up image of Nero fiddling as Rome burned
(yes, I know that never happened)
posted by caddis at 12:38 PM on June 16, 2006


What a tool.

The part where Colbert asks him to name the commandments is outstanding.

I spit milk out my nose when I watched that live the other night.
posted by T.D. Strange at 12:45 PM on June 16, 2006


The longer youtube clip is better. What an ignorant piece of shit this guy is.
posted by interrobang at 12:47 PM on June 16, 2006


"Our Revolution … presented us an album on which we were free to write what we pleased. We had no occasion to search into musty records, to hunt up royal parchments, or to investigate the laws and institutions of a semi-barbarous ancestry. We appealed to those of nature, and found them engraved on our hearts."

-- Thomas Jefferson, June 5, 1824
(who would so beat Lynn Westmoreland's ass.)
posted by grabbingsand at 12:47 PM on June 16, 2006


Very very funny. Thanks.
posted by OmieWise at 12:48 PM on June 16, 2006


It's hard to believe that this guy was too dense to realize that "Church" would've been a good answer to the question about where the commandments should be displayed, but I'm not at all surprised that he couldn't name them.
posted by Ickster at 12:49 PM on June 16, 2006


I wonder if he supports propane and propane accessories.
posted by Captaintripps at 12:50 PM on June 16, 2006


*rewinds Colbert's facial expressions over and over and over and over*

*faints because someone said a youtube link was better*
posted by WolfDaddy at 12:53 PM on June 16, 2006


Weird I blogged about this just this morning.

Should have posted about it.

Seems that the Westmoreland is just playing at being a practicing conservative Christian, and is in fact a rubber stamp for the president.
posted by stilgar at 12:59 PM on June 16, 2006


Dude has a weird gas obsession.
posted by GuyZero at 1:04 PM on June 16, 2006


Which version of "the" Ten Commandments? Somehow I'm thinking it's not the Catholic or Jewish version. Installing a specific version violates the spirit of the Establishment Clause of the Constitution.

And what about Commandments XI-XV?
Moses: The Lord, the Lord Jehovah has given unto you these fifteen...
[drops one of the tablets]
Moses: Oy! Ten! Ten commandments for all to obey!
posted by kirkaracha at 1:10 PM on June 16, 2006


The part where he baits him into offering up social security as a tax cut option is also priceless, and cruel. Rookie indeed.
posted by BrotherCaine at 1:15 PM on June 16, 2006


Think we'll see this clip used unironically by some GOP candidate who hasn't gotten the memo on Colbert yet?
posted by briank at 1:21 PM on June 16, 2006


How much does this asshole get paid? It's too much, whatever it is.
posted by psmealey at 1:24 PM on June 16, 2006


How stupid is the guy who lost to this guy?

YouTube also has a Stephen Colbert Daily Show report on the Ten Commandments.
posted by kirkaracha at 1:24 PM on June 16, 2006


How much does this asshole get paid? It's too much, whatever it is.

Congressional salaries.
posted by blucevalo at 1:28 PM on June 16, 2006


Boy, yeah, his views aside, his affect makes Napoleon Dynamite seem lucidly brilliant by comparison.
posted by docpops at 1:32 PM on June 16, 2006


Not only does he get paid a lot, they just gave themselves a raise.

Personally, I want to see a national resolution commending the works of Uwe Boll.
posted by fungible at 1:34 PM on June 16, 2006


Tax dollars hard at work.
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 1:40 PM on June 16, 2006


I think that everyone who thinks we should publicly display the ten commandments should also but pushing for all ten (rather than the current 2-5, depending on jurisdiction) should be law. Makes sense, right?

I'm guessing, by what Colbert said at the end of the video the interview was conducted on a Sunday ("thanks for taking time out of keeping the sabbath day holy" or something similar). So that would make Westmoreland eligible for either some jail time, or possibly a stoning, since pushing his political agenda is definitely 'work'.

If you're not a terrorist commandment-breaker, you would have nothing to fear from these laws.
posted by pinespree at 1:42 PM on June 16, 2006


He's the do-nothingest!
posted by SisterHavana at 1:48 PM on June 16, 2006


Doesn't everybody realize by now that these resolutions, "laws," etc, apply to everybody except the 435 members of Congress? (And the entire executive and judiciary branches?)
posted by blucevalo at 1:48 PM on June 16, 2006


whoops, I meant 535.
posted by blucevalo at 1:49 PM on June 16, 2006


pinespree: a congressman in his office on sunday? Perish the thought. More than likely he was just mocking the Honerable Reprentative's lack of commandment knowledge.
posted by absalom at 1:50 PM on June 16, 2006


absalom, you're right. I was insane to think he would work on Sunday - they probably take five day weekends.
posted by pinespree at 1:55 PM on June 16, 2006


This is nothing out of the ordinary.

Congressmen make up these impossible-to-pass proposals, make sure the local TV news stations are tipped-off (faxing a press release to newsdesks with big banner headlines such as: "Congressman West Moves to Make Natural Gas More Affordable".)

Next thing you know, your local news anchor (news reader) is on camera saying: "A congressman from our area wants to help you with your high gas bill".

It's basically a PR tactic- as well as a means to air a free political ad.

As a former local news writer, these missives make air all of the time. In NYC, Chuck Schumer and Anthony Weiner have made this std. operating procedure.
posted by wfc123 at 1:56 PM on June 16, 2006


Yeah the guy's a fuckin idiot, and yeah I laughed my ass off at this, however, let me play devil's advocate here. It is his job as a Congressman to represent his constituants. Assuming the majority of his constituants are Christian, and assuming the majority of his constituants wouldn't mind having the 10 commandments publically displayed, isn't this guy just doing his job, despite what he blieves/knows? It doesn't matter what he believes or knows, it matters what his constituants desire, and it is his job to fight for those desires.

But, yeah, he's still a douche...
posted by afx114 at 2:05 PM on June 16, 2006


I suspect the Gas thing has something to do with the $23,500 in PAC money (vs only $4,000 from defense interests) from "Energy/Natural Resources" interests.
posted by nomisxid at 2:06 PM on June 16, 2006


Are you folks all sure that segment was real? When I saw it I thought it was too great too be true.
posted by grobstein at 2:06 PM on June 16, 2006


Colbert does conduct fake interviews, after all. He recently did Teddy Roosevelt.
posted by grobstein at 2:07 PM on June 16, 2006


Which version of "the" Ten Commandments?

I don't know. I'm torn between The Five Diamonds and Harvey and the Moonglows.
posted by hydrophonic at 2:16 PM on June 16, 2006


Colbert does conduct fake interviews, after all. He recently did Teddy Roosevelt.

It's a good bet this is real considering Westmoreland is a congressman and that's him in the video. Unless he's in on the gag.
posted by puke & cry at 2:54 PM on June 16, 2006 [1 favorite]


"WHEREAS, "The Passion of the Christ" has been phenomenally successful, grossing over $330 million since its opening in late February 2004"

"Da Vinci Code" Bigger Than "The Passion Of The Christ" Worldwide.
posted by ericb at 2:58 PM on June 16, 2006


afx114:Yeah the guy's a fuckin idiot, and yeah I laughed my ass off at this, however, let me play devil's advocate here. It is his job as a Congressman to represent his constituants. Assuming the majority of his constituants are Christian, and assuming the majority of his constituants wouldn't mind having the 10 commandments publically displayed, isn't this guy just doing his job, despite what he blieves/knows? It doesn't matter what he believes or knows, it matters what his constituants desire, and it is his job to fight for those desires.

His job includes something else, too. Here ya go:

I, Loyal Citizen of the Republic, do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter. So help me God.

He really ought to be considering that bit, too. It's ... kinda important.
posted by kaemaril at 2:59 PM on June 16, 2006


Just last night I was musing on how the fundies are all about the Ten Commandments, but you never hear any of 'em saying diddly-squat about the Sermon on the Mount (a.k.a. the Beatitudes). That just doesn't sound like a Christ you can intimidate anybody with, and these assholes are all about intimidation, control, and power trips.

Just a couple of Sundays ago I was in a Lutheran church for the first time in ages. To my surprise, it was Pentecost -- I'd totally lost track of the church calendar -- but I'll be damned if they didn't go and pick "The Battle Hymn of the Republic" (apologies for the cheesy MIDI music) for the final hymn of the day. On Pentecost Sunday? Y'all have fun with that. I'm sure this guy and this one would be proud.
posted by pax digita at 2:59 PM on June 16, 2006


These Colbert interviews are pretty entertaining, if only to demonstrate how utterly stupid and out of touch many elected representatives are.
posted by fenriq at 3:00 PM on June 16, 2006


Reminds me of Andy Hiller's 1999 television interview with candidate George W. Bush regarding his knowledge -- er, lack thereof -- of the leaders of 4 world hot spots: Chechnya, Taiwan, India and Pakistan. Dubya only got one right.
posted by ericb at 3:01 PM on June 16, 2006


Wow. I just watched the Colbert interview. Are those really Westmoreland's responses to the actual questions? Is anyone really that big of a rube? Is that how you get into Congress?
posted by caddis at 3:18 PM on June 16, 2006


Assuming the majority of his constituants are Christian, and assuming the majority of his constituants wouldn't mind having the 10 commandments publically displayed, isn't this guy just doing his job, despite what he blieves/knows? It doesn't matter what he believes or knows, it matters what his constituants desire, and it is his job to fight for those desires.

Here's a map of his congressional district. The 8th District is mostly suburbs. Whether that means the majority of his constituents are Christian I don't know. Dollars for donuts, it being western Georgia, they probably are.
posted by blucevalo at 3:25 PM on June 16, 2006


how the fundies are all about the Ten Commandments, but you never hear any of 'em saying diddly-squat about the Sermon on the Mount (a.k.a. the Beatitudes).

In a nutshell, here is what most fundies know of Scripture:
posted by psmealey at 3:28 PM on June 16, 2006 [7 favorites]


Not only does he get paid a lot, they just gave themselves a raise.

Maybe if they paid Congresspeople more, they wouldn't do silly shit like push for 10 Commandment laws in order to secure reelection every two years. Or they wouldn't pander to corporations/special interests in order to secure jobs after they leave office.

It'd be great if we would elect people that want to serve in Congres simply to do their duty for the country, but we don't. If we could pay each Congressperson $1 million/year while in office with generous guaranteed pensions in exchange for integrity and honesty, it'd be worth it. It'd be a shame to have to pay for it, but it'd be worth it.
posted by mullacc at 3:32 PM on June 16, 2006


Without Colbert and Stewart, I'd have moved to Botswana long ago.
posted by bardic at 3:45 PM on June 16, 2006


He should fire his aide(s) for not anticipating the "name the ten commandments" question/dagger of truthiness coming from miles away.
posted by jca at 3:46 PM on June 16, 2006


Maybe if they paid Congresspeople more, they wouldn't do silly shit

Um no, they most definitely would. Greed is quite limitless, and too much money is never enough for these people.

What might solve the problem however is publicly funded campaigns - there's no paying back your campaign donors for their "generosity." Unfortunately, the only people who could enact such a thing are the very ones rolling around in money right now.
posted by fungible at 3:50 PM on June 16, 2006


How does someone like that get elected to Congress? Its amazing.
posted by chunking express at 3:53 PM on June 16, 2006


How does someone like that get elected to Congress? Its amazing.

You really think so?
posted by Jimbob at 4:02 PM on June 16, 2006


How does someone like that get elected to Congress? Its amazing.

Well, the right wing fundies have such a lock on the electorate in some areas of the south, all you have to do is be endorsed by them and they do the rest: phoning, promoting your position, etc. They could get a dirty dish rag elected just by telling everyone they support crap like this guy spouts.

Sad little perversion of democracy; kinda like politics in Iraq.
posted by Mental Wimp at 4:14 PM on June 16, 2006


*faints because someone said a youtube link was better*

I'll take a YT (rather, a flash video) link that you know is going to work vs the hit and miss nature of so many other video formats. I don't care if the quality isn't the best, but to each his own.
posted by jikel_morten at 4:16 PM on June 16, 2006


blucevalo, what's interesting is that his is by far the most agressively gerrymandered district in the state. I guess there's a rule that congressional districts have to be contiguous, but they stretched that one to the breaking point. I guess someone had a pretty precise idea of what demographic they wanted.
posted by George_Spiggott at 4:18 PM on June 16, 2006


You really think so?

Maybe, "it's sad," would be a better thing to say about it. I guess i'm not actually amazed.
posted by chunking express at 4:18 PM on June 16, 2006


George Spiggott, thanks -- I didn't know that. It's sure as hell got the shape of a gerrymander, that's for sure.
posted by blucevalo at 4:21 PM on June 16, 2006


Wasn't there an NPR interview with Colbert about 2 years ago where he revealed that he's a fairly adherent and practicing catholic, in church every sunday, etc... hence all the god material? Or was that one of the other Daily Show correspondants?
posted by Fupped Duck at 4:32 PM on June 16, 2006


I can't believe nobody's mentioned the "Are you a Georgia peach?" part of the interview.
posted by pruner at 4:41 PM on June 16, 2006


Ickster wrote:

It's hard to believe that this guy was too dense to realize that "Church" would've been a good answer to the question about where the commandments should be displayed,

Is it? Isn't this the exact type of candidate that Gingrich and Delay have been putting together for the last 10 years? A bunch of guys who look good in a suit yet have nary a brain cell in their head. They picked guys who are easy to control and will do exactly what they say without question. It's the Stepford Congress. It's worked so well that the corporate execs who run the cable networks have done the same.
posted by any major dude at 4:42 PM on June 16, 2006


What a peach!

That Colbert report video is fantastic.
posted by loquacious at 4:43 PM on June 16, 2006


fungible writes "Um no, they most definitely would. Greed is quite limitless, and too much money is never enough for these people."

Why do you have to start with "Um no"? It's so condescending. Anyway--I'm not necessarily advocating that we make Congresspeople flush with cash, but I think an examination of financial incentives in the system is worthwhile--and it would have to include the possibility of paying them more, in one way or another. In any case, as you point out, any change to the system is bound to fail with the rotten crew currently in place.
posted by mullacc at 4:45 PM on June 16, 2006


yes, Colbert is a devout Catholic. But, being a good Christian and being a right wing fundie have nothing in common.
posted by badstone at 4:59 PM on June 16, 2006


One might almost go so far as to say that being a good Christian and being a right wing fundie are mutually exclusive.
posted by leftcoastbob at 5:08 PM on June 16, 2006


Agreed, Bob. Agreed.
posted by Hildegarde at 5:09 PM on June 16, 2006


Catholics are very liberal. Except on abortion. It's a fucking wonder they don't have their own party (like they do in many countries), but if they did, you can bet that they'd side with the liberal side of the isle much more than they would with the conservative side (liberal and conservative here are used in the context of modern U.S. politics).
posted by zpousman at 5:45 PM on June 16, 2006


Politicians Living on the Brink.
posted by ericb at 6:00 PM on June 16, 2006


mullacc writes "It'd be great if we would elect people that want to serve in Congres simply to do their duty for the country, but we don't. If we could pay each Congressperson $1 million/year while in office with generous guaranteed pensions in exchange for integrity and honesty, it'd be worth it. It'd be a shame to have to pay for it, but it'd be worth it."

What about paying them $1/yr, and completely unable to receive any sort of monetary recompense while in office? Or indeed, after? Treat the job like jury duty (leaving aside the fact that juries are foten made up of peopel too stupid to get out of JD--there are soem who serve who do it because it's a civic responsibility. Those are the people any country wants in office).
posted by dirtynumbangelboy at 6:00 PM on June 16, 2006


afx, those are some mighty big assumptions you're making there. you sure the majority of his constituents want the ten commandments put in front of a courthouse?

here's a better question: you sure they asked for it before he brought it up?

another better question: what's he doing to provide them with the jobs, job security, better education, safer streets they no doubt also want? if they'd been asked about the commandments, having been told that working on that would take away from, say, getting them better jobs or better education, do you think they'd still want it?

honestly, I can't tell if you just put forth what you said as a hypothetical or not. so seriously, do you really think this guy is doing this because he thinks that's what his constituents really want?
posted by shmegegge at 6:03 PM on June 16, 2006


also, every time I hear about this ten commandments nonsense, I always think that it would be wonderful for a rabbi of some importance to make a pilgrimage to this guy's hometown or district and give a grand speech in favor of the act, saying "I cannot tell you what it means to the jewish people to see such passion and understanding from you on behalf of our religion and the tremendously important jewish figure of Moses. On behalf of jews everywhere, I thank you."

Then see what the approval ratings on shit like this looks like.
posted by shmegegge at 6:06 PM on June 16, 2006 [1 favorite]


What about paying them $1/yr, and completely unable to receive any sort of monetary recompense while in office?

Well then we're back to square one... only people with independent means would be able to hack that for such a long term.
posted by rolypolyman at 6:11 PM on June 16, 2006


Is this serious ???

if so Ameri..uh The World is fucked up
posted by zouhair at 6:16 PM on June 16, 2006


What about paying them $1/yr, and completely unable to receive any sort of monetary recompense while in office?

Yeah, that kinda "citizen legislature" bit doesn't work out so well, as only the very rich, or the very corrupt can afford to sit as legislators.

There are four simple steps to repairing American democracy: Do those things, and we'll be dandy.
posted by stenseng at 6:26 PM on June 16, 2006 [2 favorites]


yes, Colbert is a devout Catholic. But, being a good Christian and being a right wing fundie have nothing in common.
posted by badstone An hour ago


Good point. I guess I would fall into the rather devout (but not Catholic) category. Despite this, I think the fundies have completely co-opted the message and are using it to justify selfish and evil agendas. God will not be pleased. The fundies problem is they can't stop the hate. Hate is wrong. Period. No matter what your religion or belief, hate is wrong. They fundies hate everyone. They are doomed to Hell. Sorry, but it's true. Stop the hate.
posted by caddis at 6:35 PM on June 16, 2006


LOOOL I really thought first ti was some kind of "montage" but no, this guy is really stupid
posted by zouhair at 6:35 PM on June 16, 2006


Oh stupid and guess what, he's a FUCKING CONGRESSMAN
posted by zouhair at 6:36 PM on June 16, 2006


Get out of here! No!
posted by sonofsamiam at 6:38 PM on June 16, 2006


Ahahahah, he was stumped after three -- classick! I love how Colbert put his hands up to count them off.

As a former local news writer, these missives make air all of the time. In NYC, Chuck Schumer and Anthony Weiner have made this std. operating procedure.

Schumer is by far worse than Weiner. He makes spammers look like slackers. And he's the kind of asshole who shows up 45 minutes late to the press conferences he calls to hawk these bullshit bills. But newspaper editors are just as much to blame as Schumer because they know they can rely on him for a quick and lazy way to fill newshole.
posted by Alexandros at 6:42 PM on June 16, 2006


Why do you have to start with "Um no"? It's so condescending.

Sorry, I'm rather jaded. By internet standards, I thought I was being pleasant. My bad.

Also, while it sounds like a good idea to give incentives to Congresspeople for being ethical, I get the feeling that it would just turn into incentives for not getting caught.
posted by fungible at 6:51 PM on June 16, 2006


Public campaign financing

The fundamental bitch: You must overturn the ruling that says money is free speech. Without that, public financing doesn't help unless you spend many billions funding candidates -- so much that personal wealth becomes irrelevant.
posted by eriko at 7:02 PM on June 16, 2006


The fundamental bitch: You must overturn the ruling that says money is free speech.

Well, to get the rest of the reforms, you pretty much need a constitutional amendment, so you might as well throw that in, too.
posted by monju_bosatsu at 7:06 PM on June 16, 2006


It's amazing how the Daily Show guys (and girl) are able to keep a straight face throughout their bits, but it's not surprising that the interviewees don't catch on. They probably do hundreds of interviews, talking to all sorts of semi-literate talking heads and freaky reporters-- in that contextI can see myself not being prepared for a gag interview. And like everyone else said, this guy is obviously an empty suit.

But at the same time, even if he caught on, I'm not sure what would be a better response that just playing along and being pleasant. I always cringe, expecting somebody to flip out and get mad, but they never do.
posted by jimmy76 at 8:39 PM on June 16, 2006


I enjoy Colbert's interviews, and I have seen a fair amount of them. But they are always shots of one person or the other. We don't see their faces together. I think that this is done to allow for greater freedom in editing. I think that the interviews are cut up to make Colbert look funnier and the guest look more stupid. In this interview, we see the funny Colbert faces and gestures, but I am guessing that they may have been added after the interview. Many times I have watched one of these interviews and felt that the guest would not be responding in such a manner if he was looking at those expressions. Also, I think that they change the questions after the interview to get the response to sound funnier. No proof, just suspicion.
posted by flarbuse at 8:59 PM on June 16, 2006


It's amazing how the Daily Show guys (and girl) are able to keep a straight face throughout their bits, but it's not surprising that the interviewees don't catch on. They probably do hundreds of interviews, talking to all sorts of semi-literate talking heads and freaky reporters

A lot of people do know, and it makes the daily show correspondents job a lot harder. But really they just edit those videos down a lot.
posted by delmoi at 10:31 PM on June 16, 2006


flarbuse, I think I first heard about the techniques you're describing in conjunction with 60 Minutes.
posted by pax digita at 10:35 PM on June 16, 2006


psmeasly: My father is a fundamentalist Christian who reads the Bible every single day, and yet... those are the only points of scripture that he really gets excited about.

I guess reading it and absorbing it are two different things.
posted by grapefruitmoon at 10:38 PM on June 16, 2006


honestly, I can't tell if you just put forth what you said as a hypothetical or not. so seriously, do you really think this guy is doing this because he thinks that's what his constituents really want?

Read my post again. Devils advocate = rhetorical/hypothetical. No, I don't think he's doing what his constituents want, just putting forth an possible explanation for his batshitinsaneness.
posted by afx114 at 10:46 PM on June 16, 2006


flarbuse writes "In this interview, we see the funny Colbert faces and gestures, but I am guessing that they may have been added after the interview."

Many short segment news interviews are done that way, with a few reaction shots done apart from the interview spliced into the dialogue.
posted by krinklyfig at 10:46 PM on June 16, 2006


afx, I figured, just wasn't sure if that was one of those loosely tossed off "i'm playing devil's advocate, but seriously this is what I think" things. thanks for clarifying for me.
posted by shmegegge at 11:03 PM on June 16, 2006


Catholics are very liberal. Except on abortion.

Please. Some Catholics are liberal. There used to be a large liberal Catholic movement, back in the 60s. But the ones who have stayed attached to that train wreck of a church in the US are mostly either a) stupid or b) as wacked out fundie as any Assemblies of God lunatic. The only things the church itself is liberal about are the death penalty (though they don't really put their money where their mouths are) and man-boy love, where their clergy most certainly put their mouths where the money is.

I know of at least two Catholic churches where John Kerry was denounced from the pulpit on the Sunday before the 2004 election day as a baby-killing sodomite-loving monster. By priests. That is a total violation of the law.

There is only one solution, if the majority of Americans, who are hedonistic, secular, and never go to church despite believing in "Gawd" when asked directly, would only finally get their shit on the ball: TAX THE CHURCHES.
posted by fourcheesemac at 12:22 AM on June 17, 2006


People, please. You are firing shotguns at the cart, when the problem is the horse.

Ban political ads on TV.
posted by dglynn at 3:07 AM on June 17, 2006


Not to take anything away from the performance, but what clicked with me was the timing. Whoever edited this piece did a great job.
posted by SteveInMaine at 5:53 AM on June 17, 2006


No, keep political ads on TV. Just make them free to put on (we do own the airwaves, right?) limit them fairly and distribute them evenly. No squishing on free speech, and we might actually get to hear from people who wouldn't ordinarily be able to afford a spot.
posted by DenOfSizer at 2:10 PM on June 17, 2006


So he's a shill for natural gas, propane, and meaningless evangelical Christan posturing, and he has a girl's name? Sign me up for the campaign!
posted by kyleg at 3:13 PM on June 17, 2006


what's interesting is that his is by far the most agressively gerrymandered district in the state

the girl i was watching it with laughed as soon as they put the district up on the screen. it's shaped like some kind of amoeba from a gary larson strip.
posted by spiderwire at 2:37 AM on June 18, 2006


What really infuriates me about HR1998 is that I'm a Georgia resident, and I had to have my tax dollars spent of this. How much did this cost me? Could that money have gone to something else (like, oh, say, education)?
posted by triolus at 11:43 AM on June 20, 2006


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