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A Geek for Every Season
December 5, 2007 9:24 AM   Subscribe

What variety of Geek are you? You can probably find yourself on The 56 Geeks Poster. Via
posted by bove (90 comments total) 5 users marked this as a favorite

 
I would say that I am a book, TV, & drama geek.
posted by bove at 9:25 AM on December 5, 2007


Can you na-ame, na-ame, name them all today?
posted by Wolfdog at 9:30 AM on December 5, 2007


What, no circus geek?
posted by eddydamascene at 9:31 AM on December 5, 2007


Tron Geek is so PG. I like my Tron Guy with more peen, thanks.
posted by iconomy at 9:38 AM on December 5, 2007


I'm an FPP geek, and, on a scale from one to ten, this was the worst. FPP. Evar.

And now, a rare picture of Sean Connery, signed by Roger Moore.
posted by suckerpunch at 9:38 AM on December 5, 2007


LOL GEEK
posted by ersatz at 9:38 AM on December 5, 2007


Aren't these nerds?
posted by chrismear at 9:41 AM on December 5, 2007


I was paging through looking for a general science geek but eventually got bored (INSTANT GRATIFICATION GEEK). Why does Flickr's interface suck so much?
posted by DU at 9:43 AM on December 5, 2007


There are 10 types of geeks in the world: those who don't get this joke and those who are sick of it.
posted by Plutor at 9:45 AM on December 5, 2007 [10 favorites]


Aren't these nerds?

There might be some dorks in there too. It can be hard to tell from pictures. We need a field guide.

I'm reasonably sure there are no herbs in this post.
posted by never used baby shoes at 9:49 AM on December 5, 2007


3 or 4 of them (that anime geek is fittingly androgenous) are female. That's a real bummer to this film geek.
posted by Ambrosia Voyeur at 9:51 AM on December 5, 2007 [2 favorites]


10? THAT"S ONLY 2 PLUTOR!!! ZOMG WHAT A DOPE!!!!
posted by Mister_A at 9:51 AM on December 5, 2007 [2 favorites]


Why does Flickr's interface suck so much?

To be fair it's more "Why do people persist in trying to use Flickrs interface for things that it's totally not appropriate for"?
posted by Artw at 9:52 AM on December 5, 2007


I'm no geek! Let me take a look at this list.

Oh.

Oh. Yep.

Yep. Me, too.

Yep.

Yeah, I'm four kinds of geek. I guess I knew that.
posted by ColdChef at 9:54 AM on December 5, 2007


NERRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRDS!

I am an omnibus geek.
posted by absalom at 9:55 AM on December 5, 2007


After reading the word 'geek' 50+ times in a row, it doesn't even sound like a word anymore!
posted by splatta at 10:02 AM on December 5, 2007


My nickname in highschool was Geek Magnet. I don't see that on the poster, though.
posted by miss lynnster at 10:03 AM on December 5, 2007


What does the paint-covered "geek geek" signify? Is it meant to be a self portrait?
posted by Iridic at 10:04 AM on December 5, 2007


What does the paint-covered "geek geek" signify? Is it meant to be a self portrait?
I think it is.
Because the artist is geeking out over all the different types of geeks, he's a geek geek.

Which I guess makes me a geek geek geek.

And anyone who favourites this comment a geek geek geek geek.
posted by seanyboy at 10:06 AM on December 5, 2007 [4 favorites]


I'm an FPP geek, and, on a scale from one to ten, this was the worst. FPP. Evar.

I'm so geeky I have my own poster, and you're wrong by about fifteen miles. Keep walkin'. See the mushroom thread looming way over there? A few miles past that is the no-land of ground zero.

Now, as for the poster? What, no girls? The geekiest people I know are girls.
posted by loquacious at 10:06 AM on December 5, 2007


There are at least 3 girls on the poster.
posted by SBMike at 10:10 AM on December 5, 2007


No bike messenger or vegan geeks? Man, I feel left out.
posted by dead_ at 10:11 AM on December 5, 2007


Yeah, I noticed a surprising lack of girls, too. Weird.

And are all of these really geeks? Fitness geek? Come on. I remember when geek used to mean something.
posted by lunit at 10:20 AM on December 5, 2007


I was paging through looking for a general science geek but eventually got bored (INSTANT GRATIFICATION GEEK).

Just click on the "all sizes" button on the page for the whole poster. There shall ye find the geek you seek.
posted by Horace Rumpole at 10:24 AM on December 5, 2007


"Geek" has almost lost all meaning. What is a "Travel geek"? Someone who likes to travel? I think the correct term is bodybuilders or jocks -- what the heck is a "fitness geek"? That's either a contradiction in terms, or "geek" has been so watered down that it just means "someone who's interested in something".
posted by jiawen at 10:25 AM on December 5, 2007


And, what lunit said.
posted by jiawen at 10:26 AM on December 5, 2007


Just go to the whole poster image on Flickr, and look at it at maximum zoom.

I'm a geek, but I didn't fit any of the geek profiles...until the last. I'm a geek geek. I'm not into Star Trek, but I know all about Star Trek geekdom, terminology, etc. Same with Star Wars, Linux, gadgets, games, RPGs, transformers, anime, etc. etc. I'm a geek about geeks.

(Well, to be fair, I'm a subculture geek in general, with lots of useless knowledge about musical genres I don't care about, extreme sports I'm not interested in, etc. etc.)
posted by Bugbread at 10:26 AM on December 5, 2007


I'm a film geek and also a geekgeek, a la Miss Lynnster's variety. Where the geeks are, happy am I.
posted by Ambrosia Voyeur at 10:28 AM on December 5, 2007


jiawen writes "I think the correct term is bodybuilders or jocks -- what the heck is a 'fitness geek'? That's either a contradiction in terms, or 'geek' has been so watered down that it just means 'someone who's interested in something'."

You've just never met a fitness geek. I've met a few, not many. They are geeks, through and through. They have the personality, interests, attitude, etc. of people who are into overclocking PCs or dressing up like Final Fantasy. They do what jocks do, but the way they approach it is totally different and geeky. It's a little hard to describe, but you know it the minute you meet them. I think it's the way they get all excited and happy talking about metabolism and muscles and the like. It's not like a jock who likes to talk shop, it's more of a palpable happiness and excitement talking about the field they're in. But, really, it's hard to express. You'll know one when you meet one.
posted by Bugbread at 10:30 AM on December 5, 2007


I am disappointed that not one of these geeks is actually biting the head off a chicken.
posted by BitterOldPunk at 10:50 AM on December 5, 2007 [1 favorite]


It looks like someone hacked definition of the term "Geek".
posted by blue_beetle at 10:55 AM on December 5, 2007


Geek = Superenthusiast is the best definition I can come up with. I think the lack of Female Geeks speaks more to the male single-mindedness that lends itself to geekery than an attempt to exclude females. Women just don't seem to be nearly as geeky about their pursuits as guys. I have a hard time imagining a woman wanting to spend hundreds of hours on say, elaborate model train setups for example.

One exception that leaps out at me is The Relationship. Women tend to have more responsibilities too, once teh kids enter the picture....
posted by Scoo at 11:01 AM on December 5, 2007


bugbread, so a geek is just an enthusiast? Yeah, it's still watering down the language.
posted by oddman at 11:02 AM on December 5, 2007


I know fitness geeks. Seriously.
posted by konolia at 11:03 AM on December 5, 2007


Bugbread, you are spot on. I take spin class from one.
posted by konolia at 11:04 AM on December 5, 2007


um. I know plenty of female geeks who spend hours each day on really nerdy things.

But I suppose men are more encouraged to pursue geeky things - those activities tend to be advertized/framed as more "masculine."
posted by lunit at 11:06 AM on December 5, 2007


Scoo and others: Geek here is being used as a synonym for Otaku. It's somewhat more obsessive than enthusiast. I, too, know a few "fitness geeks". Funny thing is, they are not necessarily fit. They do know all about how to get fit, it just doesn't always work out.
posted by The Bellman at 11:12 AM on December 5, 2007


A "fitness geek" will drop the words "vo2max", "anaerobic thresehold" and at least three different heart-rate measurements into the conversation within the first minute, if they can sustain a conversation that long without looking at their goddamned heart-rate monitor. That's your basic fitness geek.
posted by Wolfdog at 11:15 AM on December 5, 2007 [3 favorites]


5/56, not including zombie geek. And strangely enough, videogame geek.
posted by slimepuppy at 11:21 AM on December 5, 2007


oddman writes "bugbread, so a geek is just an enthusiast? Yeah, it's still watering down the language."

Really? I've always understood "geek" as meaning "enthusiast". Or, rather, "so enthusiastic that 'normal' people think it makes the enthusiast uncool". That's been my understanding since around the early 80's, so if the language got watered down, it was a few decades ago.
posted by Bugbread at 11:23 AM on December 5, 2007


Ok, I think I'm represented, but you have to put the correct pieces together; take the robot head, the Indy's hat, gadget's backpack, Kiss's tongue, Warhammer's codpiece, collector's air of insouciance, and history's love of skulls, and you have a pretty accurate description of me.

Oh, and Spartan's love for screaming. Can't forget that.
posted by quin at 11:25 AM on December 5, 2007


I think the lack of Female Geeks speaks more to the male single-mindedness that lends itself to geekery than an attempt to exclude females.

Okay, thanks for the anecdotal evidence of your perspective. Now stop perpetuating that stereotype, please.
posted by Ambrosia Voyeur at 11:25 AM on December 5, 2007 [1 favorite]


Ambrosia Voyeur writes "Okay, thanks for the anecdotal evidence of your perspective. Now stop perpetuating that stereotype, please."

Well, there's the problem: without hard figures, anecdotes are all there are to go on. Stereotyping isn't, in itself, a bad thing ("Japanese people are Buddhist" is a stereotype, but almost always correct, and not insulting or harmful). So if you want him to stop perpetuating the stereotype, you should probably either provide some kind of evidence that the stereotype is incorrect, or an argument about why, correct or incorrect, the stereotype is harmful. Without those, "Now stop perpetuating that stereotype, please" is about as useful as "Now, send me five dollars, please".
posted by Bugbread at 11:40 AM on December 5, 2007


No, I think the lack of female geeks speaks to the understanding of male as "default." Of the three women, two of them are in "sexy" costumes, and the other is a scrapbooking geek - generally a female pursuit. All of the other geeks - the ones which represent activities males or females can equally engage in (and which don't involve cleavage) are male. I don't think the artist consciously decided to exclude women, the artist just thinks in terms of male=default.
posted by arcticwoman at 11:43 AM on December 5, 2007


No black people either! *outragegasm*
posted by slimepuppy at 11:46 AM on December 5, 2007


No, there are fitness geeks - and not just neckless bodybuilders. The fitness geeks are the folks that train for triathlons with GPS receivers, PDAs, video/datalogging and even advanced homebrew biometrics. They use complex software to model and plan training schedules, obsess over result comparisons.

There's lots to geek out on, now. High tech clothes, "performance monitors" like the Nike/iPod logger, GPS receives tailored for runners, bikers and climbers, body computers, "fuel" foods and more.

Not to mention things like diet-tweaking or even *gasp* artificial body modifiers like steroids, hormones or aggressive nutrient regimens.


However, I agree that "geek" is now overused and undervalued. In recent subculture terms - in the context it is used here - it used to mean "awkward, tech-adept or obsessive person not quite unhip enough or academic enough to be a true nerd."

But as the term becomes more and more common, I find myself retreating into the "nerd" category.

Because I don't really have anything in common with someone who just happens to have a Buffy slash fanfic habit, but whom is otherwise completely and utterly mundane.

Geeks were "broad-spectrum specialists". While they often had one or a few things they excelled at, they were also competent in nearly everything else - except maybe social grace or "coolness", exuberance and earnesty an easy stumbling block in this world.

Geeks are not otaku or fanatics.

Someone who simply trainspots isn't a geek. Someone who trainspots and build model railroad layouts isn't a geek. Even someone who trainspots, models, knows railroad history and even maybe worked as an engineer isn't really a geek - but getting damn close.

But someone who trainspots, models, knows the history of railroading, can build and repair a steam engine and/or boiler, knows how to forge hardware from scratch, could actually pilot a train and convincingly pass as an engineer to switchyard control - all without ever working in the industry - and while maintaining (often many) other interests with similar fervor - and manages to do so without being entirely academic, socially isolated and/or awkward?

That? That is a geek.
posted by loquacious at 11:48 AM on December 5, 2007 [4 favorites]


THESE CAN'T BE GEEKS THEY AREN'T EATING RATS OR JERKING OFF IN A WHISKEY BOTTLE
posted by Smart Dalek at 11:50 AM on December 5, 2007


[NOT SIDESHOWIST]
posted by Smart Dalek at 11:51 AM on December 5, 2007


Okay, let's look at the poster for the body of this "women are mostly not geeks" stereotype. The female geeks are: Ren Faire geeks, Cos Play geeks (big overlap in motivation, imo) and Scrapbook geeks.

I think it's obviously incorrect that out of a sample of 56 geeks, however we choose to define the term, only 3 are female. As for "evidence," I can for one thing suggest that if Scrapbook counts, so does Beading, Sewing, Gardening, Blogging, Board Games or at least Crafting for non-represented and arguably female-dominated geekeries. For another, I can offer my personal experience with Drama geeks, Food geeks, Book geeks, Film geeks and Fitness geeks as evidence that these are NOT male-dominated geekeries.

on preview, arcticwoman's quite right, with the underlying problem of trying to be accepted as a valid geek (actually I go with "dork") as a girl. We just keep getting shunted off into geek-magnet or geek-hunter (guilty) territory, when there's real geekery to be appreciated in women, and not just in SCRAPBOOKING ugh fuck that noise.
posted by Ambrosia Voyeur at 11:56 AM on December 5, 2007 [10 favorites]


Sad to not see a "Martial Arts" geek. I would attest to the joys of using physics to ponder the optimal noggin knocker.

WWEPUB - Who Would Einstein Punch Up the Bracket?
posted by smbird at 11:58 AM on December 5, 2007


loquacious writes "But someone who trainspots, models, knows the history of railroading, can build and repair a steam engine and/or boiler, knows how to forge hardware from scratch, could actually pilot a train and convincingly pass as an engineer to switchyard control - all without ever working in the industry - and while maintaining (often many) other interests with similar fervor - and manages to do so without being entirely academic, socially isolated and/or awkward?"

That's not a geek. That's a rennaissance man. Dunno why you associate geek with that.
posted by Bugbread at 11:59 AM on December 5, 2007 [3 favorites]


Ambrosia Voyeur: That was very convincing. Thanks.
posted by Bugbread at 12:01 PM on December 5, 2007


Back in the day, you couldn't spell geek without double-E.
posted by hoppytoad at 12:21 PM on December 5, 2007


To clarify my statement of "manages to do so without being entirely academic, socially isolated and/or awkward?" and affirm bugbread's position of "so enthusiastic that 'normal' people think it makes the enthusiast uncool" - the two positions are nearly synonymous.

There's a fine line between "geek" and "nerd" which could be debated for far, far too long. To me, "nerd" means "lost and gone" in whatever endeavour it is they're undertaking. Grad students. Researchers. Mathmaticians who absentmindedly scribble experimental formula on tablecloths. People who are very single-minded about - in particular - academic topics. It could be art or music, too, not just the sciences.
posted by loquacious at 12:36 PM on December 5, 2007


Well for what it's worth, some of these things I don't think of as geekiness but rather of someone with interests. I suppose I'm a travel, art, culture, language, writing, music, animal, food, exercise, design and book geek. But is that really all so geeky? I mean, everyone has interests and probably "geeks out" over SOMETHING. Unless they're incredibly boring.

Like someone else said, I think this kind of categorization is lame. Seems so much better to think of Leonardo da Vinci as a Renaissance man and genius instead of just writing him off as a long-dead engineering and art geek.
posted by miss lynnster at 12:39 PM on December 5, 2007


miss lynnster writes "I mean, everyone has interests and probably 'geeks out' over SOMETHING. Unless they're incredibly boring."

I dunno. I think the difference really comes down to the effects of the person in question on "regular" folks.

That is: a nerd just plain alienates all the time. They have no purchase with regular folks.
The geek gets along fine (sometimes well, with "cool geeks", sometimes poorly but still scraping by), until the topic of their interest comes up, at which point they scare the regular folks away.
Regular folks get along fine all the time. They may have a strong interest in something, but they sense the line where they stop talking about their pet subject because the person they're talking to isn't as interested.

The other thing I think is really the "lighting up" part. I know people who are really passionate about music, really enjoy discussing music, but don't come off as music geeks. I also know folks who I'd consider music geeks. The difference, I feel, is that the music geeks really light up when the topic turns to music. They get all smiley, start talking fast, throwing out facts and details left and right. The music afficionado gets impassioned talking about music, the geek gets excited.

Interestingly, that's why, even though MeFi probably has a buttload of geeks, nobody comes across as a geek to me. I think it's because you can't hear a rise in pitch or see a smile in text, and few MeFites bust out the exclamation marks when talking about their pet topics.
posted by Bugbread at 12:50 PM on December 5, 2007 [1 favorite]


miss lynnster writes "Like someone else said, I think this kind of categorization is lame. Seems so much better to think of Leonardo da Vinci as a Renaissance man and genius instead of just writing him off as a long-dead engineering and art geek."

I think treating "calling a person a geek" as "writing them off" is lame. There's nothing write-offy about calling someone a geek.
posted by Bugbread at 12:51 PM on December 5, 2007


Geek = Superenthusiast is the best definition I can come up with.

Exactly. Which is why you can have fitness geeks (still not a sizable number in any gym, but you can spot them -- er, no pun intended).

It's not the subject. It's the attitude, approach, and single-mindedness. Nothing in the field of interest is trivial.
Trivia in the field of interest isn't trivial.

They get all smiley, start talking fast, throwing out facts and details left and right. The music afficionado gets impassioned talking about music, the geek gets excited.

. I think this is the first MeFi comment ever to actually somehow make me feel embarassed.
posted by dreamsign at 12:51 PM on December 5, 2007


I can for one thing suggest that if Scrapbook counts, so does Beading, Sewing, Gardening, Blogging, Board Games or at least Crafting

Not boardgaming. BoardGameGeek.com is quite the boyzone. Not exclusively, mind you, but females are a definite minority. Also, board game geeks should be included on the poster.

To be fair it's more "Why do people persist in trying to use Flickrs interface for things that it's totally not appropriate for"?

When the thing that it's totally inappropriate for happens to be one of the main functions of the site, you have problems. "This screwdriver is totally inappropriate for writing a novel" is not a legitimate complaint. "This screwdriver is totally inappropriate for turning screws" is.

Also: Geek, Dweeb, or Spazz.
posted by DevilsAdvocate at 12:53 PM on December 5, 2007


The artist is a decent cartoonist, but the overall execution was pretty dull and unimaginative. I also noticed that horror geeks got no representation. Now, send me five dollars, please.
posted by Faint of Butt at 12:55 PM on December 5, 2007


I'm sorry, but the exclusion of Tolkien geeks in their own right (while including Trek Geeks, Tron Geeks and Warhammer Geeks) renders this list invalid.

Don't get me started on that daft Liv Tyler as Arwen, or how Elrond wouldn't (and DIDN'T) send his only daughter down to the Ford of Bruinen to face seven Nazgul on her own! I mean, COME ON.

Okay, I feel better.
posted by chihiro at 12:56 PM on December 5, 2007


until the topic of their interest comes up, at which point they scare the regular folks away.

This is so true, but thinking about this, I would suggest that geeks also enjoy a considerable cross-field curiosity. You know, when it's not a subject you've already studied every last detail about, but you sense the potential of very interesting things or have questions unanswered. There are lots of subjects where, if a person were to tell me they had experience, we'd be in our own little world for the rest of the evening. I spent a good hour and a half recently with the spouse of a friend discussing the finer points of his work in construction, because there were so many questions. SO MANY QUESTIONS.
posted by dreamsign at 1:01 PM on December 5, 2007


Dreamsign: I think you're right, but I don't think that's a defining characteristic, just something that's common.

It also leads me to notice that regular folks often have really hardcore interests, but don't understand other folks' interests. They love drumming and drummers and buy Drum Magazine and know Neil Peart's kids' names, but don't get why someone could be so interested in something like Star Trek. Geeks, more often, get other interests, even if they don't like them. They might know the type of fuel used in episode 7 of Star Trek, The Next Generation, while not liking drumming, but can understand how a drummer would be totally into the different types of clips used to attach cow bells to their drum stands.

But, again, I don't think that's part of the definition of geek, just something that seems kinda common.
posted by Bugbread at 1:08 PM on December 5, 2007


No P.G. Wodehouse geek? I say.
posted by everichon at 1:10 PM on December 5, 2007 [3 favorites]


There's a fine line between "geek" and "nerd" which could be debated for far, far too long. To me, "nerd" means "lost and gone" in whatever endeavour it is they're undertaking.

This is my understanding: a geek, unlike a nerd, actually has some sort of (saleable/comprehensible) skills as a result of his geekery.
posted by kittyprecious at 1:12 PM on December 5, 2007


Some of you are, like, geeks for "trying to pin down definitions of words which are so ambiguous and used with such widely varying meanings and connotations that virtually every single person has his or her own 'definition' of them". Is there a little poster guy symbolizing that?
posted by Wolfdog at 1:16 PM on December 5, 2007 [1 favorite]


Okay, so the phrase "writing off" was kinda misinterpreted from how I meant it. I meant writing off as in finding a category to put someone into and placing them there.

The other thing I think is really the "lighting up" part. I know people who are really passionate about music, really enjoy discussing music, but don't come off as music geeks. I also know folks who I'd consider music geeks. The difference, I feel, is that the music geeks really light up when the topic turns to music. They get all smiley, start talking fast, throwing out facts and details left and right. The music afficionado gets impassioned talking about music, the geek gets excited.

Well, if being "normal" means you don't light up about stuff and get excited, that seems kinda sad. And if by lighting up and getting excited it's implied that you are also going to alienate others, that's kinda sad too.

I kinda think a great life is one where someone never loses the child-like ability to express a bit of heartfelt passion about things in life, even the small or silly things. And half of the joy of life is discovering what those things are for yourself, and sharing that joy with others. I am related to a few people who don't ever display passion over a damn thing in life and I'm thrilled that I don't relate to that. I don't ever want to. They're depressing and boring people to be around and their lives aren't much damn fun.
posted by miss lynnster at 1:29 PM on December 5, 2007


If you don't like the term "geek," don't use it. I like it fine. It's not ambiguous or problematic to me at all.

I'm a coffee geek and damn proud of it.
posted by ethnomethodologist at 1:33 PM on December 5, 2007


Wheels within wheels, everichon.
posted by chihiro at 1:46 PM on December 5, 2007 [1 favorite]


miss lynnster writes "Well, if being 'normal' means you don't light up about stuff and get excited, that seems kinda sad. And if by lighting up and getting excited it's implied that you are also going to alienate others, that's kinda sad too. "

I'm not expressing myself well. I didn't mean that only geeks "light up". I meant they light up about really specific topics. Everybody lights up. They light up talking about the vacation they're taking, or a promotion, or some awesome guy/gal they met, or their favorite musician coming to town. I meant that geeks light up about a field. You start talking about Gundam, and they get all hyped. And by "lighting up and alienating", I just mean "lighting up and going off on a subject, whether or not the people you're talking to are interested". It's not the lighting that alienates, it's the "oh, shit, bugbread started talking about fingerprint security systems again, this is going to take a while" that alienates.

miss lynnster writes "I kinda think a great life is one where someone never loses the child-like ability to express a bit of heartfelt passion about things in life, even the small or silly things."

Yeah, me too. I like geeks, and I like being one.
posted by Bugbread at 1:57 PM on December 5, 2007


omg let's not forget design/typography geeks.
posted by Ambrosia Voyeur at 2:17 PM on December 5, 2007


Why are they all fat? Not all geeks are American you know.
posted by mr. strange at 2:18 PM on December 5, 2007


Ambrosia Voyeur writes "omg let's not forget design/typography geeks."

Yeah, this chart would be insane with a drawing of every geek type. The internet has just absolutely exploded the geek genre. Or, at least, increased exposure. Pre-internet, you'd probably only meet a typography geek if you worked in the publishing industry. Otherwise, you'd never know they existed. Thanks to the net, you not only know they exist, but they get a hard-on/wet-thighs about kerning.
posted by Bugbread at 2:39 PM on December 5, 2007


I'm not much of a geek myself. Maybe a little bit nerdy around the edges... But I am totally an art fag.

I don't think there are very many people out there who are truly "normal." You scratch the surface and everyone's got a little bit of geek in them.
posted by grapefruitmoon at 3:00 PM on December 5, 2007


Holy crap. I mean, I knew I'd be on there somewhere, but that is uncanny. Curse you, geek geek!

Uncanniness aside, 56 doodles by a single cartoonist just doesn't cut it anymore. This is the post-apelad era. The stereotypes is us/ing us.
posted by ulotrichous at 3:09 PM on December 5, 2007


oh ... dear.

I got 12 :/

... and they left out a lot of stuff ... like baking (NOT the same as being a foodie, thanks) ... and knitting (especially lace, lace is awesome) ... and number theory ... and coffee ...

oh dear.

Well, it's not doing any harm to my self-image. I've known i was a geek-of-many-trades for a while, now.

Oh ...

I'm a girl, too.
posted by ysabet at 3:22 PM on December 5, 2007


These are not geeks. These are just quite-satisfied middle-class hobbyists. There needs to be some tension, man. Where is your nervous energy? You should be burning so much calories with your obsession that you don't have that spare tire. When you forget to eat, you really have an interest.
posted by Free word order! at 4:48 PM on December 5, 2007


Several people basically had it right, "geek" is originally a sideshow term, meaning a person who does a "wildman" act. The "glomming geek" was the wildman who would bite the head off of chickens or snakes.

Being that biting the heads off of live chickens is now frowned upon, sideshow performers these days substitute by eating bugs.

I used to work with The Enigma, who did a modern glomming geek act.
posted by Tube at 6:52 PM on December 5, 2007 [1 favorite]


iconomy: Tron Geek is so PG. I like my Tron Guy with more peen, thanks.

The Tron Geek is the Tron Guy. And he bought the original artwork.

And Iridic: What does the paint-covered "geek geek" signify? Is it meant to be a self portrait?

Yes.
posted by robcorr at 9:31 PM on December 5, 2007


Rock geek and band geek, but no classical music or electronic music geek? Guess I'm off the hook then.
posted by speicus at 2:47 AM on December 6, 2007


Women just don't seem to be nearly as geeky about their pursuits as guys. I have a hard time imagining a woman wanting to spend hundreds of hours on say, elaborate model train setups for example.

You haven't met myself or my friends, have you, Scoo.

*alternative education/social activism/youth geek* You mention something about school next to me, and off I go! There's a reason mdonley referred me to this question (to my friend, ironically).

And did I just miss it, or was the Internet geek missing? You'd think there'd be a representation of me the person who has an account in every Web 2.0++ site available, uses del.icio.us instead of bookmarks, has 30294 blogs and counting, can't understand why people don't know what "wallpaper" or "upload" mean...
posted by divabat at 2:50 AM on December 6, 2007


And oh come on, the Travel Geek is nowhere near what that picture represents. They know not to dress up like a tourist. Flowerprint bermudas are a NO NO.
posted by divabat at 2:54 AM on December 6, 2007 [1 favorite]


You know what this looks like to me? The Geek is the Lord of the internet. It seems to me this guy is trying to find a way for all the Special Little Snowflakes out there to have acess to the cachet of geekery. All the people who picked on the geeky kids in high school are now seeking the social benefits of being a geek, and try and claim that geekery transcends the traditional bounds of maths, science and IT and can then regain their standing in the online, pro-geek world. FFS, these stereotypes have been around for ages - couch potato or vidiot, sports nut, card sharp, jock - whacking the word "geek" in there doesn't suddenly make you internet-cool.

And I could rant for a while about the lack of women. Does that make me a "rant geek"?

Also, I too would like my five bucks back.
posted by Jilder at 3:11 AM on December 6, 2007


webcomic geek, gadget geek, conspiracy geek, book geek

I never go anywhere without listening to a subversive audiobook (about the man) on my mp3 player, while carrying my pda, cellphone, laptop, 8 pound keychain covered in thingies, 8 pencils, 2 sharpies, 3 pens, 4 lighters, and my laptop, on which I will immediately open my 200 webcomics whenever I get where I am going.
posted by tehloki at 3:26 AM on December 6, 2007


No, I don't have 2 laptops, that must be a read error on your side.
posted by tehloki at 3:27 AM on December 6, 2007


uses del.icio.us instead of bookmarks

i.e. has Firefox and wishes to format?
posted by ersatz at 4:22 AM on December 6, 2007


Jilder: "try and claim that geekery transcends the traditional bounds of maths, science and IT"

Since when are those the traditional bounds? When I was a kid in the 1980's, the traditional bounds of geekery were Star Trek and comic books. You mention "IT", which is a relatively current term, so you're talking about a tradition which started in the 1990s?
posted by Bugbread at 5:29 AM on December 6, 2007


Bugbear: My apologies, those three examples were typed out in a sort of malignant pink after-work haze. Comics and Trek are most definitely geeky pleasures. My point was more that just about anyone can fit into those categories given, even when they lack that magical spark that everyone seems to be fruitlessly trying to define further upthread. Those three sprung to mind because that's what I studied, and that's what I got hassled for - my geeky, geeky pursuits. Now that the geek is king (on the tubes at least), it ticks me off to see the people who used to throw fruit at me in high school chortling on about how geeky they are because they carry an ipod.
posted by Jilder at 4:56 AM on December 7, 2007


Ah, got it. No problem. I browse MeFi on night-shifts, so I'm totally understanding of slips-of-the-tongue.

(Er, but it's bugbread, not bugbear. Again, no problem, just so's ya know.)

I don't think it's so much a matter of popular folks pretending to be geeks, but the net bringing geeks together, and a lot of places being primarily geeky. If you lived your whole pre-internet life surrounded by a small number of geeks and a large number of norms, and then see on the net that everyone is calling themselves a geek, you might think "the geek/norm ratio is too high. Must be that norms are saying they're geeks, driving the geek numbers up". Personally, I look at my wife's net habits (she's definitely a norm), and realize that norms don't comment all over the place or join big forums as much as us geeks do, so I just think "the geek/norm ratio is too high. That probably means that either the norms aren't as netty as us geeks, or they are, but just tend to be lurkers, while us geeks are commenters". Like slashdot: the geek/norm ratio is incredibly high, but that's not because norms are calling themselves geeks for installing linux, but because the site just plain attracts more geeks than norms.
posted by Bugbread at 11:41 AM on December 7, 2007


I'm at least 5 kinds of geek - Apple, Photo, Gadget, Linux, and Code. Why isn't there just plain Music geek, which I would fit into.
posted by mike3k at 1:33 PM on December 7, 2007


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