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Incredible hulks and prisons at sea
January 10, 2008 8:24 AM   Subscribe

A visual history of floating prisons shows that using ships at prisons did not end with the infamous prison hulks along the Thames. Today, New York (home to the Prison Ship Martyr's Monument commemorating the most deadly part of the Revolutionary War) uses the impressive Bain, anchored off the Bronx, as a prison barge, while the Australians have the sleek-looking Triton as a mobile prison ship patrolling national waters.
posted by blahblahblah (21 comments total) 10 users marked this as a favorite

 
The Triton looks pretty badass, the US needs a few of those off of Florida...
posted by Spacelegoman at 9:28 AM on January 10, 2008


yes, i have heard that bain is a punitive work environment.
posted by bruce at 9:28 AM on January 10, 2008


It needs a scoop at the front, so it can just ingest the crafts of boat people and then deposit the crew and passengers in it's bowels for-up-to-one-month. Then they need to build a hovercraft version to flog to US border states with more DHS money than sense.
posted by Artw at 10:01 AM on January 10, 2008


Incredible hulks!
posted by Abiezer at 10:19 AM on January 10, 2008


Aw bollocks, missed that joke in you title. Don't mind me. **slinks off shamefaced**
posted by Abiezer at 10:20 AM on January 10, 2008


Abiezer - I just unfavourited you.
posted by Artw at 10:21 AM on January 10, 2008


I noticed, Artw. Harsh, but fair. Kudos belongs to the mighty blahblahblah here.
posted by Abiezer at 10:26 AM on January 10, 2008


This looks like a job for Snake Plisskin's aquatic brother, Popeye Pilsskin.

Cool post.
posted by Astro Zombie at 10:43 AM on January 10, 2008


Now I'm sending the hoverhulk to scoop you up.
posted by Artw at 10:57 AM on January 10, 2008


Pictures of Dutch bajesboten.
posted by jouke at 11:03 AM on January 10, 2008


The Bain is usually referred to as 'the Love Boat,' and it is in no way impressive in the context of the Manhattan skyline. It's pretty expensive, so it only makes sense in the context of New York real estate prices. "Cheaper to send them to Harvard."

"I always say to people that if I was to take you on here blindfolded, you would never know you were on water."

I guess it's pretty stable, for a boat, but you can definitely feel the rocking.
posted by anotherpanacea at 1:13 PM on January 10, 2008


As a descendent of a prison ship martyr, I would like to take this opportunity to shake my fist in the direction of the British.

*shakes fist*
posted by eddydamascene at 1:23 PM on January 10, 2008


anotherpanacea The Bain is usually referred to as 'the Love Boat,'

That link refers, I think, to the Bibby Venture, a much smaller boat that closed in 1992. The Bain was actually custom-built and replaced the Bibby Venture and the Bibby Resolution, which were originally barracks ships in the Falklands.
posted by blahblahblah at 1:37 PM on January 10, 2008


About the Bain...

3 maritime crew on board at all time, including a mate, an engineer and an oiler, which adds $ 650,000 per year to the costs.


Are these guys really paid USD200k + a year (inc on-costs) ?

That's a pretty good wicket, since I expect they ahve very little maritime-y stuff to do.
posted by wilful at 2:07 PM on January 10, 2008


The Triton looks pretty badass, the US needs a few of those off of Florida...

They could join the prison ships we already have at Diego Garcia.
posted by scalefree at 2:08 PM on January 10, 2008


That first link is excellent - a very thoughtful post.
posted by wilful at 2:14 PM on January 10, 2008


That link refers, I think, to the Bibby Venture, a much smaller boat that closed in 1992.

Ah, yes. You're right: that link is from 1989 (I just did a quick google on 'Bronx love boat' and didn't read closely.) However, the VCBC is also callled the 'Love Boat,' or at least it was in 2001-2002 when I visited there.
posted by anotherpanacea at 2:28 PM on January 10, 2008


I guess it's pretty stable, for a boat, but you can definitely feel the rocking.
If this boat's a-rockin', don't come a-knockin.

posted by kirkaracha at 3:04 PM on January 10, 2008


About the Bain...

3 maritime crew on board at all time, including a mate, an engineer and an oiler, which adds $ 650,000 per year to the costs.

Are these guys really paid USD200k + a year (inc on-costs) ?

That's a pretty good wicket, since I expect they ahve very little maritime-y stuff to do.


Probably more like 72k/yr. USD
posted by notreally at 3:13 PM on January 10, 2008


wilful: "Are these guys really paid USD200k + a year (inc on-costs) ?

That's a pretty good wicket, since I expect they ahve very little maritime-y stuff to do.
"

Well, don't forget that the barge needs to be covered 24/7/52 which means multiple crews are hired. Mariners at sea make less because IRL their 52 is more like 26. On the Bain, they probably tweak the 24 and 7 instead.
posted by Opposite George at 3:31 PM on January 10, 2008


And this is by no means a unique situation. A buddy of mine, after graduating from the USMMA at Kings Point, got a gig on a casino barge somewhere on the Mississippi that IIRC never left the dock. Not a bad gig, actually, if you want to have a normal family life.
posted by Opposite George at 3:33 PM on January 10, 2008


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