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Facial Expression Simulator Lets You Play with Emotions
April 1, 2008 2:03 PM   Subscribe

Facial Expression Simulator Apparently it's useful for helping autistics learn facial expressions, among other things. Related.
posted by shivohum (33 comments total) 9 users marked this as a favorite

 
FYI that website belongs to Computer Scientist (And Oscar Winner!) Ken Perlin.
posted by PenDevil at 2:06 PM on April 1, 2008


Is it wrong that I immediately made a zombie face?
posted by riane at 2:10 PM on April 1, 2008


I browsed through this yesterday. Get out of my head.
posted by boo_radley at 2:14 PM on April 1, 2008


those of you interested in real world uses (for normal folks) of this kinds of information should check out paul eckman's work.
posted by mano at 2:31 PM on April 1, 2008


Ah yes, the "real world" of us neurotypicals. Not like that fake world of Aspies and Autistics.
posted by symbioid at 2:40 PM on April 1, 2008 [2 favorites]


Just a Browser Crash Actuator for me :(
posted by regicide is good for you at 2:57 PM on April 1, 2008


VERY cool...

By the way, it is considered inappropriate to label children with autism as "autistics".
posted by blastrid at 3:01 PM on April 1, 2008


I browsed through this yesterday. Get out of my head.

I started writing an AS3 version of this on Friday. Get out of my head, indeed. Improv is another bit that makes that specific demo /really/ cool. iirc ,the face demo was the inspiration for Half-Life 2's incredible face animation engine. Really, really cool stuff.
posted by ryoshu at 3:06 PM on April 1, 2008


Autistlings?
posted by stubby phillips at 3:41 PM on April 1, 2008


blastrid: "By the way, it is considered inappropriate to label children with autism as "autistics"."

What's the proper term?
posted by symbioid at 3:54 PM on April 1, 2008 [1 favorite]


"Children with autism" is the proper term.

As my wifed described to me once (who works directly with children with developmental disabilities), "autistic" is not "person-first language". That is, it puts the disability before the person, whereas these kids have giant hurdles already to overcome that the public has assigned them. People have misunderstood and mislabeled autism for so long, I guess it's a sensitive title.
posted by blastrid at 4:15 PM on April 1, 2008 [1 favorite]


My nephew was diagnosed with HFA. I'm still learning things. That said, I never heard "autistics" as being considered offensive before. I get your perspective.

I will admit, however, to being a bit put off by all the PC-ness of everything.

What about autistics.org which is run by people with autism? Is that like a black person calling another person a N****?

Are neurotypicals not allowed to use the term "autistics" but people who have autism allowed to do so? I never saw the term "autistics" as negative in connotation... I had always taken it as a term to denote a specific description of a person who happens to have a specific type of developmental disorder.

I'm conflicted, ultimately. If someone I consider to be on my side called me a "fat" or one of the "fats" (not fatty, that has a negative connotation, IMO -- I'm trying to think of a term that could be similar for me), I honestly don't feel I would be offended. I'm not a big fan of "differently abled", and it seems to me, that watering down specific descriptions into some lump-all category defeats the point of having these descriptions in the first place.

I'm not saying you're wrong, I'm just trying to wrap my head around it, and I think it's a complex issue. But thanks for mentioning it, because I never would have known that it was considered offensive by people. So I'll keep it in mind, and ponder this and research.
posted by symbioid at 4:48 PM on April 1, 2008


"Children with autism" is the proper term.

I was about to say the same thing. It's pretty bad at this point in psychology/psychiatry (especially; perhaps medicine in general is becoming the same?) to define people by their disease. I work in a schizophrenia lab, and I have a labmate who will stop someonone mid sentence if one calls a patient "a schizophrenic".
posted by supercres at 4:50 PM on April 1, 2008


OK, putting it as "defining people by their disease" makes sense.

However, when it's put in a given context, I don't see a problem with that. In this case, we're talking about a specific manifestation (lack of ability to read emotional expression), and I think it's entirely appropriate.

Wait, I think I may be reacting here on a defensive level... Shutting up now.

Why wasn't I called out for using the term "Aspie"?
posted by symbioid at 4:59 PM on April 1, 2008


Why wasn't I called out for using the term "Aspie"?

Because Aspies don't talk to people.

(See, I can say that, because it runs in my family; fortunately I only got a mild dose.)
posted by supercres at 5:03 PM on April 1, 2008 [2 favorites]


So I could be a person with alcoholic abuse tendencies? A person with commitment avoidance? That's a LOT better than being a lazy drunk.
posted by yhbc at 6:29 PM on April 1, 2008 [4 favorites]


Some folks on the autistic spectrum actually prefer to be "autistics" because they believe their autism is an inherent part of who they are. From that perspective calling it "defining people by their disease" is in itself offensive -- they do not see it as a disease.
posted by litlnemo at 6:29 PM on April 1, 2008


Quadriplegics? I wonder if they prefer to be referred to as "people who don't have any movement in their arms and legs" in everyday conversation.

"Hey honey, I've got to go volunteer down at the Society For People Who Don't Have Any Movement In Their Arms And Legs this weekend! They're having a picnic down at the park."
posted by Jimbob at 6:46 PM on April 1, 2008 [3 favorites]


It reminds me of "Alone in the Dark". Especially the "frightened" expression.
posted by smackfu at 7:47 PM on April 1, 2008


Are neurotypicals not allowed to use the term "autistics" but people who have autism allowed to do so?
There's are two levels of irony to that idea, in this context: the rules surrounding who is, and is not, allowed to use words are baffling enough to neurotypicals, let alone to autistics; secondly, autistics are among the least likely groups of people to take such a usage as a slight.

So I could be a person with alcoholic abuse tendencies? A person with commitment avoidance? That's a LOT better than being a lazy drunk.
There seems to be a strong correlation between length of phrase, formality, and perceived respect.
posted by aeschenkarnos at 7:50 PM on April 1, 2008


There seems to be a strong correlation between length of phrase, formality, and perceived respect.

As a physically disabled person, I can chime in here somewhat...it's really a bouillabaisse of age, political orientation, personal reference, and many other things, the language issue...I've seen it can vary substantially from one disability to another. I'm used to "putting the condition first": disabled person, autistic person...all my friends used that formulation with never a note of malice intended, and even today, I find it difficult to use the other way round without really thinking ahead.
posted by StrikeTheViol at 8:13 PM on April 1, 2008


"Differently abled" on the other hand, sounds like a slur to me, and I tell any particularly overcorrecting folks to use different words in my presence.
posted by StrikeTheViol at 8:18 PM on April 1, 2008


Hey, I understand the backlash, and I'm kind of annoyed by the PC-ness of it as well.
And I think supercres explained it better than I did...
posted by blastrid at 8:53 PM on April 1, 2008


Is it wrong that I immediately made a zombie face?
posted by riane at 2:10 PM on April 1


Of course, as soon as I read this, I had to go try it. It turns out to be surprisingly easy. And awesome.
posted by medialyte at 9:44 PM on April 1, 2008


What about Kids Who Can't Read Good And Wanna Learn To Do Other Stuff Good To? I hear they have an awesome centre.
posted by tiny crocodile at 12:26 AM on April 2, 2008


Too. Apparently I can't read good either. Serves me right.
posted by tiny crocodile at 12:27 AM on April 2, 2008


Speaking of facial simulation: this may just freak you the hell out.
posted by stavrosthewonderchicken at 12:40 AM on April 2, 2008


The guy who did this, Ken Perlin, worked on the movie Tron at a company called MAGI. He also invented 3d noise-based texture mapping, a cornerstone of modern CG, for which he won an Oscar.
posted by jfrancis at 1:33 AM on April 2, 2008


blastrid writes "'Children with autism' is the proper term."

What do we call them when they turn 18? For god's sake, if I ever lose my ability to walk, just call me a cripple or a gimp. Don't sugarcoat it with euphemism and politically correct cant.
posted by orthogonality at 5:01 AM on April 2, 2008


Fwiw my cousin (who's 28) has always been referred to as an "autistic person" not "an autistic". Seems okay to me.
posted by tiny crocodile at 7:22 AM on April 2, 2008


He also invented 3d noise-based texture mapping, a cornerstone of modern CG, for which he won an Oscar.

I mis-read that as "nose-based texture mapping" and was like "he won an Oscar for mapping noses??".
posted by EndsOfInvention at 7:38 AM on April 2, 2008


tiny croc, I can live with that. Perhaps my upset-ness was due to the unwieldy nature of "person with disabilty x"

Also, I'm seconding that "differently abled" dislike. My girlfriend is on disability. I jokingly call her my "gimpy girlfriend". No, I wouldn't dare do this to anyone else.

But, we're all "differently abled", I don't call someone "differently colored". I call someone black, white, asian, whatever. Or, if I'm not dealing with such specificities, "a person".
posted by symbioid at 8:41 AM on April 2, 2008


Wow, the left/right only buttons allow you to make some truly bizarre expressions - I set the eyes pointing in rather dramatically different directions, and immediately creeped the hell out of myself! I don't know what it is about eyes not focusing together that sets off some sort of uncanny-valley "this thing is injured/broken/NOT RIGHT" reaction, surprisingly strongly.
posted by FatherDagon at 12:53 PM on April 2, 2008


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