The Bicycle Tutor
June 17, 2008 2:46 PM   Subscribe

The Bicycle Tutor is a site with lots of video tutorials designed with a sole purpose; to teach you how to fix your own bicycle. [via mefi projects]
posted by Effigy2000 (29 comments total) 93 users marked this as a favorite

 
Wow, what a great resource! Thanks!
posted by sveskemus at 2:48 PM on June 17, 2008


Thanks! I was about to use WD-40 on my bike chain.
posted by bonobothegreat at 3:13 PM on June 17, 2008


You'll laugh, but... I recently bought a bicycle and encountered my first ever Presta valve. This would have worked a lot better than my bewilderment and subsequent cursing. Thanks!
posted by selfnoise at 3:20 PM on June 17, 2008


How timely: I've just been wondering about rebuilding my bottom bracket since its starting to creak when I crank hard, but didn't really know exactly how to start.
Thanks for the great post Effigy2000.
posted by isopraxis at 3:27 PM on June 17, 2008


I was about to use WD-40 on my bike chain

Not a bad first step, for de-gunking it.
posted by everichon at 3:36 PM on June 17, 2008


I'd like to see a threadless headset overhaul. He's working on a Kuwahara, which is the same brand of bike I used to race BMX. Mine's currently in my grandmother's attic, and will be overhauled when my toddler is ready for it.
posted by spikeleemajortomdickandharryconnickjrmints at 3:46 PM on June 17, 2008


That is an awesome web site. I've been riding mountain bikes casually for years and I didn't understand shifting one-tenth as well as it explains it.
posted by Joybooth at 4:15 PM on June 17, 2008


Very cool, I found this on del.icio.us and had no idea it originated here.

I'm in the first stages of building my first bicycle, so a lot of these videos are going to be extremely helpful to me. Many thanks to alxram for creating such a resource and for doing a fine job of explaining the methods demonstrated.
posted by invitapriore at 5:20 PM on June 17, 2008


Oh great! Now he tells me how to wrap drop handlebars, well I guess it'll come in handy when my white tape turns brown.

Thanks for reminding me about this site, now if he could only tell me why the screws on my chain gear attaching it to the crank keep coming loose, its 6 bolt, and I don't have the largest chain gear on. Oh wait theres my problem, I think I need washers.
posted by sir_rubixalot at 5:42 PM on June 17, 2008


> Thanks for reminding me about this site, now if he could only tell me why the screws on my chain gear attaching it to the crank keep coming loose, its 6 bolt, and I don't have the largest chain gear on. Oh wait theres my problem, I think I need washers.

It's probably five bolt. And, yes, washers. Or just shorter bolts. Do it now. If the chainring isn't secure on the crank spider it will eventually shatter under load.
posted by ardgedee at 6:01 PM on June 17, 2008


Oh my god.
posted by CitrusFreak12 at 6:11 PM on June 17, 2008


Damn, I wish there was a site like this for... everything.
posted by yath at 6:11 PM on June 17, 2008


Nice. Bookmarked.
posted by recurve at 6:14 PM on June 17, 2008


This totally helped me fix my chain a couple of months ago. I don't know why I didn't post it to the blue then...
posted by [NOT HERMITOSIS-IST] at 6:33 PM on June 17, 2008


I can't believe this thread has made it so far with nary a mention of resident river god of bicycle repair Sheldon Brown, RIP. Tsk and shame on all of you!


It's probably five bolt. And, yes, washers. Or just shorter bolts. Do it now. If the chainring isn't secure on the crank spider it will eventually shatter under load.

Also, grease the threads of the bolts using something like Phil Wood Waterproof Grease and torque them down TIGHT.


(re: WD-40 on a chain) Not a bad first step, for de-gunking it.

Ehhhh, just use some Boeshield T9. It'll extract the gunk while not forcing out the preexisting lubricant as the WD-40 would do. N.B. that if your chain is gunked up enough to require a WD-40 cleaning, and I mean REALLY crapped up, it's probably a better idea just to replace it... $20 well-spent.
posted by The Michael The at 7:06 PM on June 17, 2008


Awesome! (My new Firefox 3.0 just got its first bookmark tags. Aw.)
posted by nosila at 7:24 PM on June 17, 2008


I'm so flabbergasted by the sheer magnitude of awesomeness that I must go lay down.

Than, upon rising, I shall fix my bike, and I shall fix it so hard.
posted by cheeken at 9:24 PM on June 17, 2008


Fixing your own bike is empowering! I bought a used bike during the winter and encountered some things that needed fixing. After replacing the bottom bracket and switching over the derailleurs (and adjusting them) from another bike I had and it actually working I felt like a very smart man. I have almost trued a wheel myself, but I was excited that after maybe 20 or so hours it was, while not round, dished correctly for single-speed use(and true enough to ride on). Bikes are pretty simple and I suggest that everyone at least give it a try. Supporting your LBS (local bike shop) is great, but with the price of bike parts on the internet usually a lot cheaper, and the free knowledge to replace the parts its very hard to stop into a shop anymore. bikeforums is also a great resource.
posted by thylacine at 9:38 PM on June 17, 2008


Wow, that is a terrific resource! I've recently taken up cycling as a new hobby, and I imagine this will come in useful sooner or later.
posted by PhillC at 10:04 PM on June 17, 2008


Great resource -- thanx for posting.
posted by dancestoblue at 11:51 PM on June 17, 2008


This is excellent.
posted by fixedgear at 3:24 AM on June 18, 2008


[This is good]
posted by drezdn at 8:14 AM on June 18, 2008


WD40 will cause you to break your chain. I know. I am happy to end your thread now.
posted by toastchee at 8:21 AM on June 18, 2008


Very cool. Pretty soon local bike shops will be a thing of the past.
posted by wfrgms at 8:59 AM on June 18, 2008


> Pretty soon local bike shops will be a thing of the past.

I hope not. I'm all for home and curbside repairs, and I assembled my last bike from components, rims, spokes and hubs. I still had a shop put in the headset and bottom bracket because the tools for that cost many times the cost of labor. Having somebody experienced do it right the first time means I didn't ruin a brand-new frame while trying to get a jerrybuilt headset press to drive squarely.

There are some things that experienced pros will always do better than earnest amateurs, either through their experience or resources.
posted by ardgedee at 11:21 AM on June 18, 2008


I still had a shop put in the headset and bottom bracket because the tools for that cost many times the cost of labor.

That's probably the most frustrating thing for me about bikes, so many of the parts require special expensive tools to do work on them.
posted by drezdn at 11:28 AM on June 18, 2008


Sweet, thanks for the tips ardgedee and The Michael The.
posted by sir_rubixalot at 5:12 PM on June 18, 2008


Even though I'm richie Rich and I love my Park headset tool, you can install a headset with a length of threaded rod, two hex nuts and two large flat washers or fender washers. Total hardware store cost is well under ten bucks. If you use cartridge bottom brackets, the tool is like seven bucks and you can use an adjustable (aka Crescent) wrench to turn it. You can join your local Bike Church or Bike Kitchen for access to seldom-used tools, or you can stop by my house (bring beer).
posted by fixedgear at 3:59 AM on June 19, 2008


I used this just this morning to figure out how to tighten my spokes enough to get my wheel back towards true and stop squeaking. It is awesome.
posted by whir at 10:04 AM on June 19, 2008


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