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HistoryShots—information-related history graphics
July 26, 2008 10:41 AM   Subscribe

Looking for the graphic "The Genealogy of Pop/Rock Music" I remembered from Tufte, I found HistoryShots. [previous mention]
posted by cgc373 (16 comments total) 11 users marked this as a favorite

 
thanks!
posted by not sure this is a good idea at 11:53 AM on July 26, 2008


Very pretty! However, I would like (in a totally nondefecatory way) to point out that it should not be taken as an actual guide to the history of rock. It fails particularly at the beginning and end.

In the beginning: It starts with Bill Doggett, Pat Boone, Bill Haley, Carl Perkins/Elvis/Gene Vincent. Fine individuals all, but white as my part-Irish ass. And then later we get all the colored folks segregated into their little "R&B" niche. I furthermore object to the lack of historical sense embodied in starting in 1955 when that music was a direct offshoot of Ike Turner and his band (who, if anyone, "invented" rock and roll, the most notable record being "Rocket 88" from 1951) -- and that was a direct offshoot of the kind of heavily rhythmic jazz exemplified by "honkin'" Illinois Jacquet (notably at Jazz at the Philharmonic in 1944) -- and that was prefigured by Jacquet's own "Flying Home" from the year before. Not that all the prehistory should be in the chart, but it should somehow be indicated that the music didn't spring direct from the brow of a bunch of goofy white dudes in 1955.

In the end: It omits the MC5 and the Modern Lovers and Blondie and Patti Smith and the New York Dolls and Television and the Ramones, just off the top of my head.
posted by languagehat at 12:27 PM on July 26, 2008 [3 favorites]


....that music was a direct offshoot of Ike Turner and his band (who, if anyone, "invented" rock and roll, the most notable record being "Rocket 88

Languagehat is, as usual very wise. And 100% correct vis a vis Ike Turner's Rocket 88, though some have said Little Richard (which would be on the right trail, but a bit after the fact). I can get with the Illinoise Jacquet lineage, but not without the mention of Louis Jordan, who came only a little later, and must be factored in -- in any decent historical account. We've seen the stories when Charlie Parker walked into a club, and didn't know Jordan or his band, who was playing and said somerthing like "well, that's it for jazz". That may be an aprocraphal tale , but worth noting. (Not that I would agree with it at all).
posted by Seekerofsplendor at 1:38 PM on July 26, 2008


Damn, how could I forget Louis Jordan? Indeed, no account of the origins of r&r can omit him. (Why can't I find a YouTube video of "Is You Is Or Is You Ain't My Baby"?)
posted by languagehat at 2:41 PM on July 26, 2008


Languagehat: Bill Doggett was black. Just a minor correction from a Bill Doggett fan.
posted by pablocham at 3:38 PM on July 26, 2008


Cf. Pete Frame's Rock Family Trees.
posted by Knappster at 3:43 PM on July 26, 2008


Those genealogies are great, Knappster. They're kind of hard to read on the web, same as the Garofalo graphic is. WANT POSTER.
posted by cgc373 at 4:08 PM on July 26, 2008


It's interesting that History of the Political Parties II makes a point of labeling "Terrorist Attack on America," and a couple years later, "Iraq War," with no mention of that other war in between--Remember that other war?
posted by Sys Rq at 4:11 PM on July 26, 2008


Languagehat: Bill Doggett was black. Just a minor correction from a Bill Doggett fan.

Yikes! And I should have known that, seeing as how (now that I look him up) he played with Louis Jordan and "is also reputed to have written one of Jordan's biggest hits, 'Saturday Night Fish Fry.'" Thanks for the correction.

Cf. Pete Frame's Rock Family Trees.

That book is one of my most cherished possessions. I am in awe of the level of dedication it took to put together all that information (and write so small, yet legibly).
posted by languagehat at 5:32 PM on July 26, 2008


Silly geneology.

Everyone knows The Ramones invented rock'n'roll in 1975.
posted by BitterOldPunk at 7:59 PM on July 26, 2008


There is probably one person who can said to have single-handedly invented a sub-genre of pop/rock music, and that is Gram Parsons for Country-rock.

The fact that his name does not appear on this thing at all is a serious serious mistake and undermines the credibility of the whole enterprise. That said, it's kind of cool and I kind of want it.
posted by drjimmy11 at 8:32 PM on July 26, 2008


Dewey Finn's History of Rock. Contains healthy doses of punk and metal.
posted by stargell at 9:16 PM on July 26, 2008


Alas, History of Political Parties is also not without its biases. The Tories as a tiny offbranch of the Whig mainstream? Pfft. Not in 1775.

Also: the music chart has a "Glitter" branch and doesn't list T-Rex? Where am I?
posted by nasreddin at 12:30 AM on July 27, 2008


Dewey Finn's History of Rock. Contains healthy doses of punk and metal.

While misspelling all of it. PS: "'80s" is not a genre, dipshit. Also: "rap" and "hip hop" are not different except in the minds of white people scared of "rap culture."
posted by nasreddin at 12:33 AM on July 27, 2008


While misspelling all of it. PS: "'80s" is not a genre, dipshit. Also: "rap" and "hip hop" are not different except in the minds of white people scared of "rap culture."

This is somebody's transcription of the chalkboard in School of Rock, which—mistakenly, it now appears—I found amusing. Guess I'll go retreat back to my race bunker now.

Jeez.
posted by stargell at 8:16 PM on July 28, 2008


...sorry. I get easily irritated sometimes.
posted by nasreddin at 8:25 PM on July 28, 2008


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