Join 3,512 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)


online services and tools
October 20, 2008 9:50 PM   Subscribe

200+ Tools for Surviving the Economic Crisis l Free printable Basic Budgeting Worksheet l Building Your First Budget l How To Create a Budget l How to Make a Budget and Stick to It l Frugal Family Recipes.

MetaFilter Wiki: Cooking On a Budget
posted by nickyskye (37 comments total) 89 users marked this as a favorite

 
The dented-can, fell-off-the-loading-dock, about-to-turn-but-not-yet, and the elderly-vegetables sections of the supermarket has always helped me through times of little cash.
posted by not_on_display at 9:57 PM on October 20, 2008


Fast twice a week.
posted by Burhanistan at 9:59 PM on October 20, 2008


Get a girlfriend who doesn't eat much, and finish hers!
posted by turgid dahlia at 10:09 PM on October 20, 2008 [2 favorites]


(No, not finish her.)
posted by turgid dahlia at 10:11 PM on October 20, 2008


Settle down.
posted by Burhanistan at 10:16 PM on October 20, 2008


I'll be just fine. Great-grandpappy is gonna teach me the apple business.
posted by twoleftfeet at 10:16 PM on October 20, 2008 [1 favorite]


Hillbilly Housewife

posted by jason's_planet at 10:32 PM on October 20, 2008


I am surprised "bang stick" did not make the list.
posted by Mr_Zero at 11:07 PM on October 20, 2008


1. Cut up your credit cards.
2. Yes, all of them.
3. AND the store cards.
4. AND all your other cards.
5. Seriously, you have to stop borrowing money now and just live on what you earn.
6. I *know* it sucks.
7. Stop blubbing. There's no crying in a recession.
8. Here, just give them to me for fuck's sake. I'll cut them up.
9. Jesus. Are you OK?
10. Dials 999
posted by chuckdarwin at 1:26 AM on October 21, 2008 [5 favorites]


The backwoods entrepreneur eternal question: meth, moonshine, or maryjane?
posted by codswallop at 1:49 AM on October 21, 2008 [1 favorite]


This thread is useless without a link to the perennial favorite, cruel gruel. "It has a pleasant taste. Drink it."
posted by adipocere at 2:20 AM on October 21, 2008 [2 favorites]


Library card. Home cooking. Landline phone.

Stop laughing!
posted by Smart Dalek at 3:43 AM on October 21, 2008


Smart Dalek: Library card. Home cooking. Landline phone.

Stop laughing!


2nding Library Card: good for not just books, but also CDs, DVDs and the occasional X360 game or CD-ROM in Massachusetts.

Land... line?
posted by not_on_display at 4:37 AM on October 21, 2008


Let's all assume the government won't collapse! Hooray!
posted by Kikkoman at 4:43 AM on October 21, 2008


Cable TV vs. the torrent PVR: $80/mo.
Drive-thru morning coffee you could make at home: $80/mo.
Two crappy table-service meals out per month (with a friend), vs. date-night at home: $80/mo.
Another silly gadget vs. making do with what you have: $80 (or more)/mo.
Half-a-pack a day vs. your health: $80/mo.
Two pints at the pub vs. one pint at the pub: $80/mo.
Lunch with co-workers 5 days a week vs. brown-bagging 2 days a week: $80/mo.
Biweekly ATM withdrawal of $300 vs. $260 (a tiny stretch): $80/mo.

$80 a month is $1000 a year. What could you do with an extra grand? Or two?
It doesn't take much to make a big difference in a year's budget.
posted by seanmpuckett at 5:00 AM on October 21, 2008 [4 favorites]


Library card. Home cooking. Landline phone.

Yes, yes. But what can I do differently. Next you'll be telling me not to replace my pre-Intel computer!
posted by nax at 5:36 AM on October 21, 2008


Biweekly ATM withdrawal of $300 vs. $260 (a tiny stretch): $80/mo.

Wow. You take out $300. biweekly?


I have the sudden feeling these tips are not for me. I've got to go repair some pants.
posted by The Whelk at 6:30 AM on October 21, 2008


Darn socks!

No, really, I hate these darn socks!
posted by Fuzzy Skinner at 6:58 AM on October 21, 2008 [4 favorites]


Save money by only buying the new MacBook, not the MacBook Pro.

Do it for your country.
posted by blue_beetle at 7:02 AM on October 21, 2008


Biweekly ATM withdrawal of $300

I take $20 out of my atm, maybe once every other month or so. What are you buying with $150 a week? I'm assuming this is separate from credit/debit cards.

I have to agree with The Whelk. These tips really aren't for me.
posted by mitzyjalapeno at 7:03 AM on October 21, 2008


fell-off-the-loading-dock,

In college we would go over to the Providence train yards, where if they dropped a box of vegetables while unloading, they'd just leave the busted open box on the tracks. We ate a lot of iceberg lettuce.
posted by StickyCarpet at 7:13 AM on October 21, 2008 [1 favorite]


the meals on a budget includes this unhelpful warning:

"Attention Forum Boards, Bloggers and Webmasters... The recipes on this Web site are protected by copyright laws. . ."

so, um, attention Michelle Jones...since these instructions are iterations of ideas or of facts (as opposed to expressions of original language), recipes are absolutely NOT protected by copyright law, as a matter of federal case law. you have absolutely zero recourse if someone copies these recipes and pastes them somewhere else. you may be interested in the united states copyright office's take on this question . . . since my guess is that they would, um, know . . .

. . . that is all . . .
posted by deejay jaydee at 7:18 AM on October 21, 2008 [3 favorites]


Biweekly ATM withdrawal of $300...I'm assuming this is separate from credit/debit cards.


No, this is advocating cash budgeting with little or no use of credit or debit charges. I used to do something similar to avoid bank fees. As a student, I had no monthly fee accounts for my monthly budgeting, but these had few free transactions and high per transaction fees, thus the use of cash. You budget based on what's left in your wallet for the week.
posted by bonehead at 7:37 AM on October 21, 2008


Ah okay, that makes a little more sense. I use a debit card mostly (no credit for me!), but there are no fees for purchases.
posted by The Whelk at 7:45 AM on October 21, 2008


That first link is awesome. Thanks for posting; I would have never seen it otherwise.

I really think we need some collection of MeFi financial advice; there's been quite a few good posts lately (not to mention answers in AskMe).
posted by desjardins at 8:34 AM on October 21, 2008


Learn to solder, learn to sew.
posted by eclectist at 10:00 AM on October 21, 2008 [2 favorites]


The $300? It's cash budgeting. All groceries, meals out and sundries are purchased with cash.
Sorry if that wasn't clear.
posted by seanmpuckett at 3:36 PM on October 21, 2008


Can you tell me why anyone would copy those gag-inducing recipes in the first place? Gah. Just go buy Hamburger Helper in all it's salt laden, vomit looking variations and you could replace about two thirds or her so-called recipes.

Now if any of them started with, you take your road-kill and clean it, or maybe, skin your rat, I might take her seriously.

Inexpensive cooking does not have to involve ketchup or cream of whatever soup. How about black beans and rice made with an inexpensive cut of pork. Or lentils? The French make a wonderful and super cheap stew. The Indians make dal. In general processed foods cost more for dietary value. People say fresh fruit and veg are too expensive. Buy frozen, almost the same nutritional value, much more affordable, and the won't rot in the fridge.
posted by Belle O'Cosity at 4:43 PM on October 21, 2008 [1 favorite]


Get your rabbits here! Pets or meat.
posted by Belle O'Cosity at 4:45 PM on October 21, 2008 [2 favorites]


There's no shame in learning the rules of Double Coupon day.
posted by drezdn at 6:23 PM on October 21, 2008


wow, adipocere, that was pretty amazing:

I am simply suggesting you process all your food in inexpensive, energy-saving ways and eat better than you ever have for less than $10.00 per week.

I hate to imagine what this guy was eating before he discovered his unique form of cookery.
posted by snofoam at 6:43 PM on October 21, 2008


I didn't know there was a Mefi wiki (!)
posted by swift at 8:31 PM on October 21, 2008


I hate to imagine what this guy was eating before he discovered his unique form of cookery.

Care for some gopher?

No, thank you, Delmar. A third of a gopher'd only arouse my appetite without beddin' her back down.

Oh, you can have the whole thing. Me and Pete already had one. We ran across a whole... gopher... village.

## O brothers, let's go down #
posted by chuckdarwin at 1:43 AM on October 22, 2008 [1 favorite]


Buy nothing except to replace something you need (not just want):All the rest -- all the worksheets and so on -- is pointless if you can't control yourself.
posted by pracowity at 4:29 AM on October 22, 2008


pracowity, I can check off everything on your list except #2. Sometimes my time is more valuable than the few dollars I can save on food by cooking it at home. We try to avoid sit-down restaurants, though.
posted by desjardins at 8:58 AM on October 22, 2008


One thing we've started doing (more because we're down to one income, than anything related to the economy) is getting the ads for the local grocery stores and then planning our menus for the next week based off of the sales items.

There's nothing quite as satisfying as paying $20 for $35 worth of groceries.
posted by drezdn at 10:57 AM on October 22, 2008


Sometimes my time is more valuable than the few dollars I can save on food by cooking it at home.

I know exactly what you mean.

Still, it is possible to cook real meals a lot of days if you cook enough for more than one meal at a time. Sometimes it takes just as long to make a little of something as it does to make a lot of it. And don't waste a lot of time on fussy stuff.

For instance, you can boil a great big cauldron of potatoes (don't peel them, just soak them and then give them a scrub with a brush) really easily and make them work in various ways -- whole, diced in a salad, thrown into a soup, fried with eggs, mashed, with a gravy or other sauce, etc. You can keep them in the fridge for days and you can toss them into tupperware for heating at work.

You can make giant things of soup or stew, too, and make it last for days. The main thing is to get yourself nice big covered pots and pans for cooking and the right tupperware-style containers for storing and transporting and nuking it.

And nothing beats a sandwich for fast, cheap food. You can slap one or two together in a couple of minutes in the morning or the night before and take them to work for lunch.
posted by pracowity at 12:30 PM on October 22, 2008


« Older "The Vital Triangle: China, the United States, and...  |  Vote for Hope... Newer »


This thread has been archived and is closed to new comments